Search Results

Author: Mott, Frank L.
Resulting in 135 citations.
1. Abma, Joyce C.
Mott, Frank L.
Determinants of Pregnancy Wantedness: Profiling the Population from an Interventionist Perspective
Review of Policy Research 13,1/2 (March 1994): 39-62.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1541-1338.1994.tb00578.x/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Policy Studies Organization
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Family Background and Culture; Fertility; Locus of Control (see Rotter Scale); Marital Status; Racial Differences; Religious Influences; Self-Esteem; Wantedness

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Although the incidence of unwanted pregnancies has declined since the early 1970s (Pratt and Horn, 1985; Anderson, 1981; Westoff, 1981), large proportions of women continue to experience unwanted pregnancies (Forrest,1987; Pratt, 1985). Of particular concern to researchers is the well-being of mothers and children from pregnancies that are unwanted or unplanned. In 1982, among women who were ever married, 10 percent of all births were unwanted, and 28 percent mistimed. Among never-married women, fully 25 percent of all births were unwanted, and about half the remaining births were mistimed (Pratt and Horn, 1985). The focus of this research is the exploration of determinants of wantedness among women whose first pregnancies result in live births. Our analyses reflect interest in whether and how pregnancy wantedness is affected by family background characteristics, early formed attitudes, value systems, and socioeconomic aspirations, as well as maternal socio-demographic status at the time of the pregnancy. Policy implications emerge from the findings, particularly concerning differences and similarities in the process determining unwanted first births for blacks and whites. Reprinted by permission of the publisher. Sociological Abstracts
Bibliography Citation
Abma, Joyce C. and Frank L. Mott. "Determinants of Pregnancy Wantedness: Profiling the Population from an Interventionist Perspective." Review of Policy Research 13,1/2 (March 1994): 39-62.
2. Abma, Joyce C.
Mott, Frank L.
Is There a 'Bad Mother' Syndrome? Evidence of Overlapping High Risk Behavior During Pregnancy Among a National Cross-section of Young Mothers
Presented: Toronto, Canada, Population Association of America Meetings, May 1990
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Alcohol Use; Birthweight; Child Health; Cigarette Use (see Smoking); Deviance; Drug Use; Fathers, Absence; First Birth; Household Composition; Mothers; Mothers, Behavior; Pre/post Natal Behavior; Pre/post Natal Health Care; Pregnancy and Pregnancy Outcomes; Unemployment

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Growing evidence documents that significant proportions of mothers engage in behaviors considered detrimental to fetal development and infant health. These risk factors include neglect of prenatal care, excessive alcohol use, and the use of nicotine or other substances. This study explores the extent to which mothers who combine two or more of the behaviors during pregnancy, constitute a subset potentially distinct from those who engage in only one or none. The authors investigate the background factors and behaviors which differentiate these groups of mothers. The 1979 through 1986 waves of the NLSY are used for analysis of first births for about 2000 younger mothers. The study points to the limitations of population statistics on prenatal behavior patterns that present each behavior separately, and investigates the potentially compounding effect multiple risk factors can have on infants.
Bibliography Citation
Abma, Joyce C. and Frank L. Mott. "Is There a 'Bad Mother' Syndrome? Evidence of Overlapping High Risk Behavior During Pregnancy Among a National Cross-section of Young Mothers." Presented: Toronto, Canada, Population Association of America Meetings, May 1990.
3. Abma, Joyce C.
Mott, Frank L.
Pregnancy Wantedness and Pregnancy Resolution: Profiling the Population from an Interventionist Perspective
Presented: Pittsburgh, PA, International Symposium on Public Policies Toward Unwanted Pregnancies, 1990
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Author
Keyword(s): Attitudes; Childbearing; Family Background and Culture; Fertility; First Birth; Household Composition; Mothers; Mothers, Behavior; Pre/post Natal Behavior; Pre/post Natal Health Care; Pregnancy and Pregnancy Outcomes; Racial Differences; Self-Esteem; Wantedness

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Issues related to the well-being of mothers and children from pregnancies that the mother deems unwanted are of continuing concern to researchers and policy makers. Using data on a cohort of young mothers from the NLSY, this paper investigates the determinants of wantedness among women whose first pregnancies resulted in live births. A nontrivial proportion of women reported that they did not want their pregnancy at that time--34 percent. Multivariate analysis tested for the independent effects of demographic factors as well as the mother's family background characteristics, other attributes and behaviors at the time of the pregnancy, and maternal attitudes and aspirations, including fertility and education/work expectations. The analyses showed that family background characteristics were not independently related to pregnancy wantedness, but being black, young and never married retained their importance for a lower likelihood of pregnancy wantedness. It appears that motivation to limit or postpone childbearing exists for white women, but for black women, orientations toward work are less incompatible with childbearing. Regardless of motivations for childbearing, large numbers of white and especially black women continue to have unwanted pregnancies, a phenomena which deserves continued research and policy attention.
Bibliography Citation
Abma, Joyce C. and Frank L. Mott. "Pregnancy Wantedness and Pregnancy Resolution: Profiling the Population from an Interventionist Perspective." Presented: Pittsburgh, PA, International Symposium on Public Policies Toward Unwanted Pregnancies, 1990.
4. Abma, Joyce C.
Mott, Frank L.
Substance Use and Prenatal Care During Pregnancy Among Young Women
Family Planning Perspectives 23,3 (May-June 1991): 117-122.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2135823
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Alan Guttmacher Institute
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Alcohol Use; Cigarette Use (see Smoking); Deviance; Drug Use; Hispanics; Household Composition; Mothers; Mothers, Behavior; Pre-natal Care/Exposure; Pre/post Natal Health Care; Pregnancy and Pregnancy Outcomes; Racial Differences; Substance Use; Wantedness

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Data on a cohort of young mothers from the NLSY were examined for use of alcohol, cigarettes, and marijuana during pregnancies leading to first births. A substantial proportion of women (45 percent) were found to have used at least one of these substances. White women were more likely to use a substance during pregnancy than were Hispanic or black women; women with a prospective father present in the household were less likely than other women to use a substance. Compared with well-educated and older women, less-educated and younger women were more likely to smoke cigarettes or marijuana during pregnancy, but were less likely to drink alcohol. Only about 13 percent of women used more than one substance. Nineteen percent of the women received no prenatal care in the first trimester of pregnancy. Less-educated and younger women were least likely to receive early prenatal care. Multivariate analysis found no association between neglect of prenatal care and substance use. Ra ther, the analysis revealed that the two behaviors shared likely antecedents, such as whether the prospective father was in the home prior to the pregnancy. Copyright: 1991 Alan Guttmacher Institute
Bibliography Citation
Abma, Joyce C. and Frank L. Mott. "Substance Use and Prenatal Care During Pregnancy Among Young Women." Family Planning Perspectives 23,3 (May-June 1991): 117-122.
5. Abma, Joyce C.
Mott, Frank L.
Substance Use and Prenatal Care During Pregnancy Among Younger Mothers: Linkages and Antecedents
Working Paper, Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, Columbus OH, February 1991
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Cigarette Use (see Smoking); Deviance; Drug Use; Fathers, Absence; Hispanics; Household Composition; Mothers; Pre-natal Care/Exposure; Pregnancy and Pregnancy Outcomes; Racial Differences; Substance Use

Data on a cohort of young mothers from the NLSY were examined for use of alcohol, cigarettes, and marijuana during pregnancies leading to first births. A substantial proportion of women (45 percent) were found to have used at least one of these substances. White women were more likely to use a substance during pregnancy than were Hispanic or black women; women with a prospective father present in the household were less likely than other women to use a substance. Compared with well-educated and older women, less-educated and younger women were more likely to smoke cigarettes or marijuana during pregnancy, but were less likely to drink alcohol. Only about 13 percent of women used more than one substance. Nineteen percent of the women received no prenatal care in the first trimester of pregnancy. Less-educated and younger women were least likely to receive early prenatal care. Multivariate analysis found no association between neglect of prenatal care and substance use. Rather, the analysis revealed that the two behaviors shared likely antecedents, such as whether the prospective father was in the home prior to the pregnancy.
Bibliography Citation
Abma, Joyce C. and Frank L. Mott. "Substance Use and Prenatal Care During Pregnancy Among Younger Mothers: Linkages and Antecedents." Working Paper, Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, Columbus OH, February 1991.
6. Baker, Paula C.
Keck, Canada K.
Mott, Frank L.
Quinlan, Stephen V.
NLSY Child Handbook - Revised Edition: A Guide to the 1986-1990 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth Child Data
Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, October 1993
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): Birthweight; Child Care; Children; Data Quality/Consistency; Fertility; General Assessment; Methods/Methodology; Mothers; Overview, Child Assessment Data; Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness

This handbook is a revised edition of NLSY Child Handbook 1989. It is designed to assist users of the 1986 Merged Child-Mother Data File, briefly describes both the longitudinal data on mothers and children collected since 1979 and discusses in greater detail the 1986 cross-sectional child assessment data.
Bibliography Citation
Baker, Paula C., Canada K. Keck, Frank L. Mott and Stephen V. Quinlan. NLSY Child Handbook - Revised Edition: A Guide to the 1986-1990 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth Child Data. Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, October 1993.
7. Baker, Paula C.
Mott, Frank L.
Following Children Over Time: Child Development and Its Linkages with Family Social and Economic Transitions
Presented: Ottawa, ON, Statistics Canada Symposium on Design and Analysis of Longitudinal Surveys, 1992.
Also: http://www.nlsinfo.org/usersvc/Child-Young-Adult/BakerMott1992ChildrenOverTime.pdf
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Statistics Canada
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Children, Behavioral Development; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Maternal Employment; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading)

Using data from the NLSY Child surveys, this paper explores how family poverty and maternal employment are linked to changes in childrens' cognitive and behavioral outcomes. The analyses employ a change score approach to first assess short-term changes in child outcomes between two successive data points (1986 to 1988 or 1988 to 1990) and levels family conditions in that interval, controlling for prior individual and family attributes. Results are then provided for a longer period over three survey points from 1986-1990 which suggest that cognitive and socioemotional change for children can vary, depending on the duration of time between base and end point as well as other factors such the child's race and maturational level.
Bibliography Citation
Baker, Paula C. and Frank L. Mott. "Following Children Over Time: Child Development and Its Linkages with Family Social and Economic Transitions." Presented: Ottawa, ON, Statistics Canada Symposium on Design and Analysis of Longitudinal Surveys, 1992.
8. Baker, Paula C.
Mott, Frank L.
Improving Data Quality through CAPI: Evidence from the 1994 NLSY Child and Young Adult Data
Presented: San Francisco, CA, Population Association of America Meetings, April 1995
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Computer Assisted Personal Interviewing (CAPI); Data Quality/Consistency; Methods/Methodology; Nonresponse; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Verbal Memory (McCarthy Scale)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The 1994 fielding of the NLS Youth marked the initiation of two new survey components, a comprehensive CAPI interview with the older children of the NLSY mothers and a conversion to CAPI much of the NLSY Child data collection. Launched on the heels of a full scale CAPI fielding of the NLSY in 1993, the 1994 NLSY Young Adult and Child CAPI surveys generally showed improvements in data quality. CAPI interviews were completed with by a Young Adult sample of 980 and a Child sample of 6040. This paper highlights some of the ways in which the introduction of CAPI affected survey completion rates, item nonresponse, and data preparation in the 1994 round of the NLSY Child and Young Adult. We address issues associated with the collection and processing of the child assessment data as well as the in-depth interviews completed with the older children of the female NLSY females.
Bibliography Citation
Baker, Paula C. and Frank L. Mott. "Improving Data Quality through CAPI: Evidence from the 1994 NLSY Child and Young Adult Data." Presented: San Francisco, CA, Population Association of America Meetings, April 1995.
9. Baker, Paula C.
Mott, Frank L.
NLSY Child Handbook 1989: A Guide and Resource Document for the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1986 Child Data
Report, Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1989
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLS General, NLSY79
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): Attrition; Child Care; Children; Fertility; General Assessment; Longitudinal Data Sets; Maternal Employment; Mothers; NLS Description; Overview, Child Assessment Data

This handbook, designed to assist users of the 1986 Merged Child-Mother Data File, briefly describes both the longitudinal data on mothers and children collected since 1979 and discusses in greater detail the 1986 cross-sectional child assessment data. It places the NLSY child data collection efforts in the context of the NLSY surveys and explains the link between data found on the child tape and variables found either in the main cohort data set or in other special NLSY tapes. The child handbook describes each of the child assessments administered during the 1986 survey round and the criteria used in their selection. It outlines field procedures used in administering the assessments, interviewer training required, and types of field conditions encountered. Information is included on how the assessments were scored and what types of summary scores appear on the merged tape. Descriptive materials about the assessments are discussed including tabular information relating the distribution of various outcome scores to a number of child and maternal characteristics, correlations between the various assessments, selected reliability coefficients, and a discussion of potential biases due to attrition. Data users are informed of certain nuances of the various assessments and limitations of these data and provided with specific instructions on how to properly access and use the child variables. Of particular importance to users is a section discussing the nature of the mother and child samples. A number of descriptive tables, details on the child data tapes, and related documentation are provided.
Bibliography Citation
Baker, Paula C. and Frank L. Mott. "NLSY Child Handbook 1989: A Guide and Resource Document for the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1986 Child Data." Report, Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1989.
10. Borus, Michael E.
Mott, Frank L.
Nestel, Gilbert
Counting Youth: A Comparison of Youth Labor Force Statistics in the Current Population Survey and the National Longitudinal Surveys
Report, Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1978
Cohort(s): Young Men, Young Women
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): Current Population Survey (CPS) / CPS-Fertility Supplement; Part-Time Work; Research Methodology; Unemployment; Unemployment, Youth

This report focuses on the accuracy of employment- related measures in the (CPS) Current Population Survey by comparing those estimates with NLS estimates. The results indicate that NLS data report: (1) considerably higher labor force participation among young men and women, especially those who attend school; (2) significantly higher unemployment rates for young women and approximately the same rates for young men; (3) more unemployed seeking part-time employment; (4) higher levels of unemployment; and (5) youth who are employed were more likely to work either part time or overtime depending on their age.
Bibliography Citation
Borus, Michael E., Frank L. Mott and Gilbert Nestel. "Counting Youth: A Comparison of Youth Labor Force Statistics in the Current Population Survey and the National Longitudinal Surveys." Report, Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1978.
11. Burchett-Patel, Diane
Gryn, Thomas A.
Mott, Frank L.
Families of Men: Exploring Relationship Dynamics with the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth
Presented: New York, NY, Population Association of America Meetings, March 1999
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Fathers, Involvement; Fertility; Male Sample

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

In this paper, we will explore the limits of paternal responsibility in a longitudinal context. Using data from the 1987 to 1996 waves of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, we examine the upper limits of paternal responsibility for the period and compare this with a more traditional cross-sectional perspective examining single-year paternal responsibility. We will contrast single-year (1996) reports for both biological and nonbiological children, in and out of the man's household, with the cumulative reports, as reported at any survey point over the 1987 to 1996 period. In addition to an overall examination of these patterns and ratios, we will contrast evidenced patterns for men who have followed different relationship profiles over the period. This includes a comparison of men who have been in a stable marriage arrangement with men who have been primarily in partnership arrangements and men who have followed less stable relationship patterns.
Bibliography Citation
Burchett-Patel, Diane, Thomas A. Gryn and Frank L. Mott. "Families of Men: Exploring Relationship Dynamics with the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth." Presented: New York, NY, Population Association of America Meetings, March 1999.
12. Chase-Lansdale, P. Lindsay
Mott, Frank L.
Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne
Phillips, Deborah A.
Children of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY): A Unique Research Opportunity
Developmental Psychology 27,6 (November 1991): 918-931.
Also: http://psycnet.apa.org/journals/dev/27/6/918/
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLS General, NLSY79
Publisher: American Psychological Association (APA)
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Child Care; Children; General Assessment; Household Composition; Life Course; Maternal Employment; Mothers; NLS Description; Overview, Child Assessment Data; Research Methodology

The data set known as Children of the NLSY offers unusual opportunities for research on questions not easily pursued by developmental psychologists. This article provides a history of children of the NLSY, describes the data set with special focus on the child outcome measures and a subset of maternal life history measures, highlights several of the research and policy relevant issues that may be addressed, and shows how the intersection of children's and mother's lives may be studied in less static, more life-course oriented ways. Exemplars are given in the topics of maternal employment and child care, adolescent pregnancy and child rearing, divorce, poverty, and multigenerational parenting. Implications of research using children of the NLSY for the field of developmental psychology and interdisciplinary collaboration are discussed. [PsycINFO]
Bibliography Citation
Chase-Lansdale, P. Lindsay, Frank L. Mott, Jeanne Brooks-Gunn and Deborah A. Phillips. "Children of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY): A Unique Research Opportunity." Developmental Psychology 27,6 (November 1991): 918-931.
13. Cooksey, Elizabeth C.
Mott, Frank L.
Gender Differences in Sexual Activity: What Role do Parents Play in Shaping Behaviors?
Presented: New Orleans, LA, Population Association of America (PAA) 2008 Annual Meeting, April 17-19, 2008
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Adolescent Sexual Activity; Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS); Parent-Child Interaction

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The social context in which adolescent sexual activity occurs has changed considerably in the recent past. Our prior research suggests that the effects of maternal sexual experience have differential impact on male and female teens. In this paper, we will attempt to unpack potentially different messages about sex given by mothers who experienced early sexual initiation themselves by using current data on mother child interactions relevant to sexual activity. We use data from the 1979-2004 waves of the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79) and their associated child files from 1986 onwards, plus the 1996-2006 NLSY79 Young Adult data. Our sample includes youth from two different cohorts: those who are 14-16 in 1996 and those who are 14-16 in 2006. Results from this project will be an important step forward to better understanding the familial dynamics of a key dimension of the transition to adulthood.
Bibliography Citation
Cooksey, Elizabeth C. and Frank L. Mott. "Gender Differences in Sexual Activity: What Role do Parents Play in Shaping Behaviors?" Presented: New Orleans, LA, Population Association of America (PAA) 2008 Annual Meeting, April 17-19, 2008.
14. Cooksey, Elizabeth C.
Mott, Frank L.
Hango, Darcy William
Why Do Some Adolescents Have Risky Sex? The Role of Family Background, Childhood Behaviors and Adolescent Relationships
Presented: Atlanta, GA, Population Association of America Annual Meetings, May 2002
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Contraception; Life Course; Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT); Sexual Activity; Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs); Substance Use

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

More than half of American youth have had sexual intercourse by the time they turn 18. Despite recent increases in condom use among adolescents, many teens fail to engage in "safe" sexual practices and hence put themselves at risk of both unwanted pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases. Using a life course perspective and data from the NLSY from 1979 through 2000, we explore the question of why some youth engage in risky sex whereas others either abstain from intercourse altogether, or engage in safe sexual practices at various ages between 15 and 20. Drawing on our own previous research findings, as well as the findings of others concerning the importance of romantic relationships to the likelihood of sexual intercourse, we pay particular attention to how relationship profiles in early adolescence might relate to later patterns of sexual behavior, and to potentially important differences in relationship trajectories and sexual practices by race and gender.
Bibliography Citation
Cooksey, Elizabeth C., Frank L. Mott and Darcy William Hango. "Why Do Some Adolescents Have Risky Sex? The Role of Family Background, Childhood Behaviors and Adolescent Relationships." Presented: Atlanta, GA, Population Association of America Annual Meetings, May 2002.
15. Cooksey, Elizabeth C.
Mott, Frank L.
Neubauer, Stefanie A.
Friendships and Early Relationships: Links to Sexual Invitation among American Adolescents Born to Young Mothers
Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health 34, 3 (2002): 118-126.
Also: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12137125
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Alan Guttmacher Institute
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Age at First Birth; Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS); Dating; Gender Differences; Racial Differences; Sexual Activity; Sexual Behavior

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

CONTEXT: Preadolescent friendships and early teenage dating relationships have implications for adolescent sexual initiation that may differ by race and gender.

METHODS: Data on participants in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth and their children are used to profile friendship and dating patterns among a sample of youth born to relatively young mothers. Logistic regression analyses examine whether these patterns predict early sexual initiation, and whether there are differences associated with gender and race.

RESULTS: As youth moved from late childhood to midadolescence, they shifted from having almost exclusively same-sex, same-grade friends to having more relationships with persons who are of the opposite sex and older. By ages 15-16, 34% had had sexual intercourse; the proportion was significantly higher among blacks (45%) than among others (31%). Most adolescents reported neither frequent dating nor a steady partner by ages 15-16, although the prevaleance of such reports was related to friendship patterns in late childhood. Twelve percent of youth who initiated sex in early adolescence did so outside of a dating relationship. For most subgroups examined, the odds of initiating intercourse during early adolescence were associated with going steady, but not with frequency of dating.

CONCLUSIONS: Prior social networking is an important element in predicting early sexual activity. Overall, youth whose mothers gave birth at young ages remain sexually inexperienced into middle adolescence, but certain subgroups are more likely than others to initiate early sexual activity.

Bibliography Citation
Cooksey, Elizabeth C., Frank L. Mott and Stefanie A. Neubauer. "Friendships and Early Relationships: Links to Sexual Invitation among American Adolescents Born to Young Mothers." Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health 34, 3 (2002): 118-126.
16. Cooksey, Elizabeth C.
Mott, Frank L.
Neubauer, Stefanie A.
Relationship Trajectories Among American Adolescents
Presented: Los Angeles, CA, Population Association of America Meetings, March 2000
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Age at First Intercourse; Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS); Ethnic Differences; Hispanics; Racial Differences; Sexual Activity; Sexual Experiences/Virginity

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

INTRODUCTION EXCERPT: In this research, we focus on the role that friendship groups and relationship patterns in middle childhood and early adolescence might play in either speeding up or delaying sexual debut. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79) mother and child data bases, we profile the gender and age balance of friendship groups, and the nature and intensity of heterosexual relationships as youth mature from middle childhood through the early adolescent years. We then explore whether or not these early friendship and relationship patterns appear linked through differential tendencies to become sexually active. Are there distinctly normative progression pathways in early adolescent relationships? Is there evidence that early sexual activity may be linked with distinctly non-normative prior friendship and relationship patterns? In our explorations, we play close attention to variations between boys and girls, and between black, non-Hispanic white and Hispanic youth.
Bibliography Citation
Cooksey, Elizabeth C., Frank L. Mott and Stefanie A. Neubauer. "Relationship Trajectories Among American Adolescents." Presented: Los Angeles, CA, Population Association of America Meetings, March 2000.
17. D'Amico, Ronald
Haurin, R. Jean
Mott, Frank L.
Effect of Mother's Employment on Adolescent and Early Adult Outcomes of Young Men and Women
In: Children of Working Parents: Experiences and Outcomes. C. Hayes and S. Kammerman, eds. Washington, DC: National Academy Press, 1983
Cohort(s): Mature Women, Young Men, Young Women
Publisher: National Academy Press
Keyword(s): Children; Educational Attainment; Mothers; Sex Roles; Teenagers

This research uses data from mother-daughter and mother-son pairs to examine the effects of mother's employment on her children's educational attainments, early adult sex role attitudes, career attainments, fertility expectations and plans to work. Measures of mother's employment include several items tapping the extent of her labor force participation when her children were still young. The models also include measures of mother's educational attainment and sex role attitudes as controls. None of the measures of mother's employment has any important effect on any of the outcome measures of either sons or daughters. However, mother's educational attainment and sex role attitudes did have some strong effects, especially for daughters.
Bibliography Citation
D'Amico, Ronald, R. Jean Haurin and Frank L. Mott. "Effect of Mother's Employment on Adolescent and Early Adult Outcomes of Young Men and Women" In: Children of Working Parents: Experiences and Outcomes. C. Hayes and S. Kammerman, eds. Washington, DC: National Academy Press, 1983
18. Gryn, Thomas A.
Mott, Frank L.
Paternal Relationship History and Male Fertility: Evidence from the NLSY
Presented: Atlanta, GA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, May 2002
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Ethnic Groups/Ethnicity; Event History; Hispanics; Male Sample; Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper uses unique longitudinal data for a national sample of over 4,000 men and their children in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth who were repeatedly interviewed between 1979 and 1998 to examine cumulative and parity-specific fertility trajectories, and their linkages with the patterning of relationships over time. A particular focus will be on exploring the extent that black, white, and possibly non-black Hispanic, respondents differ in these linkages. In addition to describing trajectories for these men as they age from middle/late adolescence to their late thirties, we use event history methodology to explore the determinants of progression to a first birth, and from a first to second birth sorting out the extent to which marriage, cohabitation histories, as well as the number of different reported partners in these relationships impact on parity progression independent of a number of socio-economic and demographic antecedents, and how this varies by race/ethnicity.
Bibliography Citation
Gryn, Thomas A. and Frank L. Mott. "Paternal Relationship History and Male Fertility: Evidence from the NLSY." Presented: Atlanta, GA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, May 2002.
19. Haurin, R. Jean
Mott, Frank L.
Adolescent Sexual Activity in the Family Context: The Impact of Older Siblings
Demography 27,4 (November 1990): 537-557.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/e283316w36q50577/
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Age at First Intercourse; Family Resources; Pairs (also see Siblings); Racial Differences; Sexual Activity; Sexual Behavior; Sexual Experiences/Virginity; Siblings

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using approximately 2,000 sibling pairs from the NLSY, this study examines the influence of an older sibling's age at first sexual intercourse upon the sexual initiation of a younger sibling. Hypotheses about differences by gender- composition of the pair are tested using a framework derived from social comparison theory and a two-stage failure-time model. Results provide evidence of a direct, but modest sized older sibling effect for white, but not black youth. This effect is approximately equal in magnitude for same- and opposite-sex siblings. Little support is offered for the greater salience and association of sexual activity for brother-brother as compared to sister-sister pairs.
Bibliography Citation
Haurin, R. Jean and Frank L. Mott. "Adolescent Sexual Activity in the Family Context: The Impact of Older Siblings." Demography 27,4 (November 1990): 537-557.
20. Haurin, R. Jean
Mott, Frank L.
Adolescent Sexual Activity in the Family Context: The Impact of Older Siblings
Report, Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, October 1989
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): Age at First Intercourse; Family Resources; Pairs (also see Siblings); Racial Differences; Sexual Activity; Sexual Behavior; Sexual Experiences/Virginity; Siblings

Using approximately 2,000 sibling pairs from the NLSY, this report examines the influence of an older sibling's age at first sexual intercourse upon the sexual initiation of a younger sibling.
Bibliography Citation
Haurin, R. Jean and Frank L. Mott. "Adolescent Sexual Activity in the Family Context: The Impact of Older Siblings." Report, Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, October 1989.
21. Haurin, R. Jean
Mott, Frank L.
Social Policy and Demographic Change: Trends in Survival for U.S. Males in the Years Preceding Retirement, 1966-1981
Report, Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1987
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): Health Care; Health Factors; Legislation; Retirement; Social Security

Using data from the NLS of Older Men (1966-1981), this paper examines the extent to which survival prospects for men in the years immediately preceding the normal retirement age have been affected by the many changes in medical and health care and in Social Security retirement and disability provisions during the period. Hypotheses relating both to generalized improvements in survival probabilities and to the narrowing of survival differentials between population subgroups defined by socioeconomic, marital, health and employment status are tested. Results indicate that many of the traditionally evidenced differentials narrow or vanish over the period. Consistent with expectations, the greatest improvement in survival is evidenced for the retired, particularly those with health problems. The selective improvement in survival chances for this group is related to ongoing transitions in medical and health care as well as retirement trends in general.
Bibliography Citation
Haurin, R. Jean and Frank L. Mott. "Social Policy and Demographic Change: Trends in Survival for U.S. Males in the Years Preceding Retirement, 1966-1981." Report, Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1987.
22. Hofferth, Sandra L.
Reid, Lori Lynn
Mott, Frank L.
A Cohort/Period Comparison of the Effects of the Timing of Childbearing on Schooling, using the NLSY and the PSID
Presented: New York, NY, Population Association of America Annual Meetings, March 1999
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Fertility; Marital Status; Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper compares estimates from the NLSY and the PSID of the effects of early childbearing on the schooling of different cohorts of young women and in different historical periods. The purpose is, first, to see whether estimates of early childbearing are similar across the two data sets and, second, to see whether the effects of early childbearing on schooling have changed over cohorts or birth periods. The data come from the National Longitudinal Survey of the Labor Market Experience of Youth and the Panel Study of Income Dynamics. The results show, first, that the results are similar for the two data sets. Second, the effects of early childbearing on schooling have declined somewhat in recent historical periods. However, the effects still disadvantage young women, most specifically, because such young women do not attend college.
Bibliography Citation
Hofferth, Sandra L., Lori Lynn Reid and Frank L. Mott. "A Cohort/Period Comparison of the Effects of the Timing of Childbearing on Schooling, using the NLSY and the PSID." Presented: New York, NY, Population Association of America Annual Meetings, March 1999.
23. Hofferth, Sandra L.
Reid, Lori Lynn
Mott, Frank L.
The Effects of Early Childbearing on Schooling Over Time
Family Planning Perspectives 33, 6 (November-December, 2001): 259-627.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3030193
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Alan Guttmacher Institute
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Family Structure; Household Composition; Maternal Employment; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Mothers, Education; Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID); Peers/Peer influence/Peer relations

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Context: In recent studies, the effects of teenage childbearing on the schooling of young women have been smaller than those in earlier research. The discrepancy has been attributed to the use in the later studies of controls for unmeasured differences between young women who start childbearing early and those who do not, but could instead reflect changes in the effect of early childbearing over time. Methods: Data from the National Longitudinal Survey of the Labor Market Experience of Youth and the Panel Study of Income Dynamics are used to identify the reasons for this difference. Logistic regression, ordinary least-squares regressions and fixed-effects models examine the impact of early childbearing on rates of high school graduation and college attendance, and number of years of schooling completed through age 29. Results: The two data sets show a significant negative impact of a teenage birth on rates and years of completed schooling. For example, teenage mothers completed 1.9-2.2 fewer years of education than do women who delay their first birth until age 30 or older. Moreover, compared with women who give birth at age 30 or older, teenage mothers have odds of high school completion 10-12% as high and odds of postsecondary schooling 14-29% as high. Unobserved differences between young mothers and their childless peers reduce, but do not eliminate, the effects of early births. Effects on high school completion declined in recent periods because more young women completed high school, regardless of the timing of their first birth. However, the gap between early and later childbearers in postsecondary school attendance widened from 27 to 44 percentage point between the early 1960s and the early 1990s. Conclusions: Given the current importance of a college education, teenage childbearers today are at least as disadvantaged as those of past generations.
Bibliography Citation
Hofferth, Sandra L., Lori Lynn Reid and Frank L. Mott. "The Effects of Early Childbearing on Schooling Over Time." Family Planning Perspectives 33, 6 (November-December, 2001): 259-627.
24. Hurst, Dawn S.
Mott, Frank L.
Potential Cultural Bias in a Standardized Reading Test: Implications for Predicting Subsequent Academic Achievement
Presented: San Francisco, CA, American Sociological Association, annual meetings, Aug 14, 2004.
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Ethnic Differences; High School; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Racial Differences; Test Scores/Test theory/IRT; Tests and Testing

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

In this presentation we briefly summarize controversies surrounding the issue of potential racial and ethnic biases embedded within the Peabody Individual Achievement Test in Reading Recognition (PIAT) and their relevance for predicting subsequent achievement. The PIAT is a standardized assessment utilized in a myriad of settings to test for scholastic achievement relative to age and grade. According to the test manual, users of the reading recognition module should be cautious in their interpretation of low scores for older children because with increasing age this particular subtest becomes a quasi-measure of “cultural sophistication”(Dunn & Markwardt, 1970, p.20). More specifically, users are advised to use caution when interpreting low scores for individuals in the fourth grade or higher. However, in our brief review of the papers and publications that employ the PIAT in analyses using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY), we found that researchers frequently drew conclusions about reading recognition scores for children at these older ages without mention of the aforementioned potential for cultural bias. Subsequent to our discussion of these issues, we examine this reading assessment as an input variable with predictive abilities. The objective is to explore the extent to which cultural biases in the individual test items, and the overall test score, can lead to inappropriate interpretations of connections between PIAT scores at one point in time and quantifiable school and standardized test outcomes several years later. In turn, we offer recommendations for future researchers interested in negotiating an accurate understanding of racial and ethnic differences in outcomes as they relate to PIAT reading recognition scores as a predictor.
Bibliography Citation
Hurst, Dawn S. and Frank L. Mott. "Potential Cultural Bias in a Standardized Reading Test: Implications for Predicting Subsequent Academic Achievement." Presented: San Francisco, CA, American Sociological Association, annual meetings, Aug 14, 2004.
25. Jekielek, Susan Marie
Mott, Frank L.
Menaghan, Elizabeth G.
Cooksey, Elizabeth C.
Changes in Family, Contributions to Children's Home Environments, and Child Well-Being
Presented: Chicago, IL, Population Association of America Meetings, April 1998
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Children, Adjustment Problems; Children, Behavioral Development; Children, Home Environment; Children, Well-Being; Family Circumstances, Changes in; Family Studies; Fathers, Absence; Fathers, Biological; Fathers, Presence; Gender Differences; Home Environment; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Household Composition; Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The objective in this research is to examine the extent to which father presence/absence associations with child behavior problems reflect changes in children's home environments during the same period. I focus on children's propensity to exhibit "acting out" behaviors (Oppositional Action) over a four year interval from middle childhood (ages 6-7) to early adolescence (ages 10-11) for a national sample of 1,917 children drawn from the Child-Mother data set of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. Previous findings from this research project suggest important differences by gender and race for the outcome of Oppositional Action. Briefly, recent absenting of a biological father appears very damaging for white boys but not for black boys. Girls exhibit generally similar patterns to those for white boys; however, black girls seem to be little affected by whether or not a father is present. In the current paper I explore the extent to which such patterns might be explained by changes in the quality of children's home environments.
Bibliography Citation
Jekielek, Susan Marie, Frank L. Mott, Elizabeth G. Menaghan and Elizabeth C. Cooksey. "Changes in Family, Contributions to Children's Home Environments, and Child Well-Being." Presented: Chicago, IL, Population Association of America Meetings, April 1998.
26. Kowaleski-Jones, Lori
Mott, Frank L.
Adolescent Risk Taking: Do Youth Learn with Experience?
Working Paper, revised presentation, New Orleans LA, Population Association of America Meetings, May 1996
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Childbearing; Childbearing, Adolescent; Contraception; Control; Parenthood; Self-Esteem

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

In this research, we investigate the extent to which early sexual activity, the use of contraception and early parenthood may be linked with a range of proximate attitudes and behaviors, controlling for a wide range of family and maternal priors. The data we use are from the 1979-1992 waves of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) and the linked 1994 young adult data file. Our sample includes about 900 youth, mostly between the ages of 14 and 18 as of the 1994 survey date. Using a partial correlation approach, we find that youth who are inclined towards risk taking are more likely to be sexually active but only girls perhaps give thought to the implications by showing some awareness of a risk in their contracepting behavior. Additionally, there is fairly persuasive and systematic evidence that for girls only, early sex, not using contraception and indeed, having a child are indeed in various ways linked with depression, having low self esteem, and having little sense of control.
Bibliography Citation
Kowaleski-Jones, Lori and Frank L. Mott. "Adolescent Risk Taking: Do Youth Learn with Experience?" Working Paper, revised presentation, New Orleans LA, Population Association of America Meetings, May 1996.
27. Kowaleski-Jones, Lori
Mott, Frank L.
Adolescent Sexual Initiation: Comparing Across a Decade
Presented: New York NY, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2007
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Adolescent Sexual Activity; Age at First Birth; Age at First Intercourse; Attitudes; Childbearing, Adolescent; Contraception; Depression (see also CESD); Deviance; Gender Differences; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Mothers, Behavior; Pearlin Mastery Scale; Peers/Peer influence/Peer relations; Risk-Taking; Runaways; Self-Esteem; Sexual Activity

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

In this research, we compare adolescents from 1994 and 2004 to investigate the extent to which early sexual activity, and early parenthood may be linked with a range of proximate attitudes and behavior. Our particular focus is on exploring whether or not there are distinctive differences in these associations across gender and period. The data we use are from the 1979-2002 waves of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) and the linked 2004 Young Adult data file. Our sample includes 860 youth between the ages of 14 and 18 in 1994 and 1934 youth between the same ages in 2004.

Using a partial correlation approach, we explore differences in the correlates of sexual activity initiation and early parenthood between 1994 and 2004. We find that youth who are inclined towards risk taking are more likely to be sexually active. Additionally, there is fairly systematic evidence that for girls only, early sex and having a child are in various ways linked with depression, having low self-esteem, and having little sense of control over their lives. The results for young men are less consistent, in several instances suggesting substantially different motivations for sexual activity between the genders.

Bibliography Citation
Kowaleski-Jones, Lori and Frank L. Mott. "Adolescent Sexual Initiation: Comparing Across a Decade." Presented: New York NY, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2007.
28. Kowaleski-Jones, Lori
Mott, Frank L.
Early Sex and Early Childbearing: Risk Taking and Learning the Hard Way
Presented: New Orleans, LA, Population Association of America Meetings, May 1996
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Behavioral Problems; Childbearing, Adolescent; Contraception; Gender Differences; Grandmothers; Sexual Activity

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Bibliography Citation
Kowaleski-Jones, Lori and Frank L. Mott. "Early Sex and Early Childbearing: Risk Taking and Learning the Hard Way." Presented: New Orleans, LA, Population Association of America Meetings, May 1996.
29. Kowaleski-Jones, Lori
Mott, Frank L.
Family and Youth Behavioral and Social-Psychological Antecedents of Adolescent Smoking Among High Risk Youth
Presented: Washington, DC, Annual Meetings of the Population Association of America, March 1997
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Behavior, Antisocial; Behavioral Problems; Children, Behavioral Development; Cigarette Use (see Smoking); Deviance; Family Background and Culture; Family Environment; Family Influences; Family Studies; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Mothers, Behavior; Psychological Effects; Socioeconomic Factors

Also: Working Paper, Center for Human Resource Research, September 1996.

In this work, we use a large national data set to explore how longer term socio-economic family and maternal as well as psychological antecedents predict both contemporary as well as longer term smoking behavior for a large sample of relatively high risk American youth. There are essentially two linked components to this research. First, we consider the relevance of longer term socio-economic and demographic prior characteristics as predictors of longer and shorter term smoking behavior. Then, controlling for this full range of priors, we explore issues which are of some interest, particularly to developmental and child psychologists; are there causal connections between childhood hyperactivity and adolescent smoking or is the often found connection spurious, in that it really reflects a likelihood that both hyperactivity and smoking behavior are intimately linked with other dimensions of child and adolescent behaviors? Additionally, to what extent does youthful smoking have an intergenerational connection independent of all the other potentially spurious factors which we are able to measure? The availability of long term maternal, family and behavioral trajectories for the NLSY youth and their families permit us to partially untangle competing hypotheses.

Bibliography Citation
Kowaleski-Jones, Lori and Frank L. Mott. "Family and Youth Behavioral and Social-Psychological Antecedents of Adolescent Smoking Among High Risk Youth." Presented: Washington, DC, Annual Meetings of the Population Association of America, March 1997.
30. Kowaleski-Jones, Lori
Mott, Frank L.
Sex, Contraception and Childbearing Among High-Risk Youth: Do Different Factors Influence Males and Females?
Family Planning Perspectives 30,4 (July-August 1998): 163-169.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2991677
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Alan Guttmacher Institute
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Attitudes; Childbearing, Adolescent; Contraception; Control; Deviance; Family Characteristics; Gender Differences; Mothers; Mothers, Behavior; Peers/Peer influence/Peer relations; Runaways; Self-Esteem; Sexual Activity; Substance Use

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Context: The likelihood that adolescents will engage in sexual activity, use contraceptives or become parents is influenced by a range of attitudes and behaviors. These factors may differ for males and females. Methods: Data on female respondents to the 1979-1992 waves of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth and the linked 1994 young adult data file on their children provided background information on 959 adolescents who had been born to young mothers. Partial correlation analysis was used to examine the factors related to sexual behavior, contraceptive use and childbirth, controlling for maternal and familial characteristics, in this relatively disadvantaged sample.

Results: Youth who are inclined toward risk-taking and those who have run away from home are more likely than others to be sexually active. For young women, having intercourse at an early age, not using contraceptives and having a child are linked with depression, low self-esteem and little sense of control over their lives. The results for young men are less consistent and often in the opposite direction. Young people who have become parents evidence greater maturity than their childless peers; women are less likely to consume alcohol or to spend time with friends who drink and men are more likely to participate in socially productive work. Conclusions: Although sexual behavior is tied to risk taking in both adolescent males and females some noticeable psychological differences are evidenced early. Behaviorally, there is room for optimism in that young parents appear to adopt more mature traits.

Bibliography Citation
Kowaleski-Jones, Lori and Frank L. Mott. "Sex, Contraception and Childbearing Among High-Risk Youth: Do Different Factors Influence Males and Females?" Family Planning Perspectives 30,4 (July-August 1998): 163-169.
31. Lynch, Jamie L.
Mott, Frank L.
Early Childhood Paternal Absence and Later Childhood Behavior Problems: Evidence from the 1979 NLSY Mother and Child Data
Presented: Dallas, TX, Population Association of America Meetings, April 2010
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Behavioral Problems; Children, Behavioral Development; Children, Home Environment; Children, Well-Being; Cognitive Development; Fathers and Children; Fathers, Absence; Gender Differences; Home Environment

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using data from the Mother and Child cohorts of the National Longitudinal Survey, this research examines the role of father absence on behavioral outcomes in late childhood. Results indicate that family disruption has a large negative effect on the emotional, but not cognitive, quality of the home environment. Important to child well-being on its own, the emotional quality of the home links father absence with an increase in externalizing and internalizing behavior problems for children at age ten. Uncontrolled estimates show a linearly increasing relationship between behavior problems and duration of father absence; however, this relationship is mediated by the emotional and cognitive home environment. Children in disrupted homes are found to maintain, and in some instances increase, high levels of behavior problems with the addition of a new father figure. Girls, but not boys, exhibit less behavior problems when a father is continuously present throughout childhood.
Bibliography Citation
Lynch, Jamie L. and Frank L. Mott. "Early Childhood Paternal Absence and Later Childhood Behavior Problems: Evidence from the 1979 NLSY Mother and Child Data." Presented: Dallas, TX, Population Association of America Meetings, April 2010.
32. Lynch, Jamie L.
Patel, Diane B.
Mott, Frank L.
Is Bad Parenting a Learned Behavior? Insights from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth
Presented: Boston, MA, American Public Health Association (APHA) 134th Annual Meeting and Exposition, November 4-8, 2006
Cohort(s): NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: American Public Health Association
Keyword(s): Child Health; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Mothers, Behavior; Transfers, Parental

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objective: To determine the inter-generational propensity of children of young mothers to repeat the pre- and post-natal behaviors of their mothers.

Background: Public health programs place an increasing emphasis on pre-natal care and early childhood parenting on outcomes for children. A question unaddressed is how much of an individual's current parenting behavior is influenced by the mothering received as a young child.

Design/Methods: The NLSY Young Adult Cohort is a representative sample of children born to women aged 14-22 in 1979. These women make up the NLSY79 Main Youth Cohort. The NLSY(YA) is uniquely suited to this analysis as it contains 1335 young adults who have already had at least one biological child. The data contains self-reported measures of pre-natal care (including, but limited to, doctor visits, substance use, and gestation detail) and post-natal attentiveness (such as well-care visits, breast feeding, and parental intellectual and socio-emotional connections with their children including items drawn from the HOME-SF scale) for both the Main Youth and Young Adult cohorts, allowing exploration of the impact of prior mother behaviors on a child's current parenting practices. The Data offers controls for confounding demographic and attitudinal measures for both young women and their Young Adults such as, but not limited to, age at first birth, family income, educational attainment, religious attachment, family and gender attitudes, and substance use across the life course.

Bibliography Citation
Lynch, Jamie L., Diane B. Patel and Frank L. Mott. "Is Bad Parenting a Learned Behavior? Insights from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth." Presented: Boston, MA, American Public Health Association (APHA) 134th Annual Meeting and Exposition, November 4-8, 2006.
33. Macke, Anne Statham
Mott, Frank L.
The Impact of Maternal Characteristics and Significant Life Events on the Work Orientation of Adolescent Women: A Longitudinal Look
Research in Labor Economics 3 (1980): 129-146
Cohort(s): Mature Women, Young Women
Publisher: JAI Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Children; Employment; High School; Marriage; Mothers and Daughters; Pairs (also see Siblings); Work Attitudes

A mother-daughter sample from the NLS of Mature and Young Women cohorts is used to examine important determinants of work orientation among adolescent women. The impact of maternal characteristics and other key life experiences is examined for adolescent women when they are in high school and again when they are college-aged and beyond. Findings show the importance of maternal influence, the college experience, the current family experiences (getting married, having a child). Implications for future trends in women's labor force participation, including continued racial differences, are discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Macke, Anne Statham and Frank L. Mott. "The Impact of Maternal Characteristics and Significant Life Events on the Work Orientation of Adolescent Women: A Longitudinal Look." Research in Labor Economics 3 (1980): 129-146.
34. Marsiglio, William
Mott, Frank L.
Does Wanting to Become Pregnant with a First Child Affect Subsequent Maternal Behaviors and Infant Birth Weight?
Journal of Marriage and Family 50,4 (November 1988): 1023-1036.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/352112
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: National Council on Family Relations
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Age at First Birth; Birthweight; Breastfeeding; Childbearing; Deviance; Health Factors; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Mothers, Behavior; Mothers, Race; Pre-natal Care/Exposure; Pre/post Natal Behavior; Pre/post Natal Health Care; Urbanization/Urban Living; Wantedness

Using data from the NLSY, the authors examined the relationship between whether or not women wanted to become pregnant with their first child, and their subsequent maternal behaviors and infant\'s birth weight. Fifty-five percent of the sample wanted to become pregnant when they did. Being a black or younger mother was associated with below average levels of pregnancy wantedness, while living in an urban area was positively associated with wantedness. In addition, it was found that while wantedness was related to most of the maternal behaviors in a bivariate context, age at childbearing and race tended to be responsible for these relationships. In a multivariate context, women who wanted their pregnancy were more likely to initiate prenatal care early in their pregnancy and more likely to gain 50 or more pounds during pregnancy. However, wantedness was not a significant predictor of: alcohol or smoking behavior, low weight gain by the mother during pregnancy, her infant\'s birth weight, whether she ever breastfed, or whether she took her infant for wellcare soon after birth.
Bibliography Citation
Marsiglio, William and Frank L. Mott. "Does Wanting to Become Pregnant with a First Child Affect Subsequent Maternal Behaviors and Infant Birth Weight?" Journal of Marriage and Family 50,4 (November 1988): 1023-1036.
35. Marsiglio, William
Mott, Frank L.
Does Wanting to Become Pregnant with a First Child Affect Subsequent Maternal Behaviors and Infant Birth Weight?
Working Paper, The Ohio State University, Center for Human Resource Research, Columbus, OH, revised, July 1987
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Birthweight; Deviance; Pre/post Natal Behavior; Wantedness

Using data from the NLSY, we examined the relationship between whether or not women wanted to become pregnant with their first child, and their subsequent maternal behaviors and infant's birth weight. Fifty-five percent of the sample wanted to become pregnant when they did. Being a black or younger mother was associated with below average levels of pregnancy wantedness, while living in an urban area was positively associated with wantedness. In addition, it was found that while wantedness was related to most of the maternal behaviors in a bivariate context, age at childbearing and race tended to be responsible for these relationships. In a multivariate context, women who wanted their pregnancy were more likely to initiate prenatal care early in their pregnancy and more likely to gain 50 or more pounds during pregnancy. However, wantedness was not a significant predictor of: alcohol or smoking behavior, low weight gain by the mother during pregnancy, her infant's birth weight, whether she ever breastfed, or whether she took her infant for wellcare soon after birth.
Bibliography Citation
Marsiglio, William and Frank L. Mott. "Does Wanting to Become Pregnant with a First Child Affect Subsequent Maternal Behaviors and Infant Birth Weight?" Working Paper, The Ohio State University, Center for Human Resource Research, Columbus, OH, revised, July 1987.
36. Marsiglio, William
Mott, Frank L.
Sex Education for American Youth: Its Availability, Timing, and Relationship to Teenage First Intercourse and Premarital Pregnancies
Working Paper, Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, February 1986
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): High School Curriculum; Pregnancy, Adolescent; Sex Education; Sexual Experiences/Virginity

The objective of this paper is to bring new evidence to bear on a few of the more salient sex education issues by presenting both descriptive and multivariate analyses based on a national representative sample of American youth. The data we use focuses on youth who have taken a separate course relating to sex education and five topics their course may have covered.
Bibliography Citation
Marsiglio, William and Frank L. Mott. "Sex Education for American Youth: Its Availability, Timing, and Relationship to Teenage First Intercourse and Premarital Pregnancies." Working Paper, Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, February 1986.
37. Marsiglio, William
Mott, Frank L.
The Impact of Sex Education on Sexual Activity, Contraceptive Use, and Premarital Pregnancy Among American Teenagers
Family Planning Perspectives 18,4 (July-August 1986): 151-154+157-162.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2135324
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Alan Guttmacher Institute
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Behavior; Childbearing; Contraception; Sexual Activity; Sexual Behavior; Sexual Experiences/Virginity

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study examined data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Labor Market Experience of Youth, a U.S. panel survey of 6,288 women and 6,398 men who have been interviewed each year since 1979 when they were 14-22 years old. The principal objectives of this research were to document the proportion of a recent cohort of teenagers who had taken a sex education course and the extent to which they were exposed to five types of course instruction, and to examine systematically the relationship between exposure to a sex education course and sex-related behaviors of young women. The findings indicated that the majority of young people (66 percent of women and 79 percent of men) had become sexually active by age 19. A notable finding was that a sizeable proportion of youth had sexual intercourse for the first time without having taken a sex education course. Among those teens who became sexually active by age 19, only 53 percent of women and 35 percent of men had taken a sex education course before they first had intercourse. Analyses revealed, after controlling for a series of sociodemographic factors, that 15- to 16-year-old girls who were virgins and who had taken a sex education course were slightly more likely to initiate sexual activity within the year after their course than those who had not taken a course; no relationship was found between course taking and sexual activity for 17- and 18-year-old women. Young women who had previously taken a sex education course were significantly more likely to use effective contraceptives than were teenagers who had never had a course. However, course taking did not affect young women's probability of experiencing a nonmarital pregnancy before age 20 in a multivariate context.
Bibliography Citation
Marsiglio, William and Frank L. Mott. "The Impact of Sex Education on Sexual Activity, Contraceptive Use, and Premarital Pregnancy Among American Teenagers." Family Planning Perspectives 18,4 (July-August 1986): 151-154+157-162.
38. Maxwell, Nan L.
Mott, Frank L.
Trends in the Determinants of Early Childbearing
Population and Environment 9,2 (Summer 1987): 59-73.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/27503065
Cohort(s): NLSY79, Young Women
Publisher: Plenum Publishing Corporation
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Childbearing; Contraception; Fertility; First Birth; Mothers, Race; Racial Differences; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

This study uses data from the Young Women and NLSY cohorts to examine the extent to which socioeconomic background factors and race have changed in their ability to predict a first birth before age 19 between 1968 and 1980 for women aged 19 to 23. The authors find little support for their hypothesis that the increasing availability of contraception and abortion for young women from all social classes reduces the traditionally strong inverse association between social class and early childbearing. There is evidence that, even after controlling for changes in socioeconomic background factors, black young women are significantly more likely than their white counterparts to bear children before age 19 in 1980 and the relative gap between races in this regard did not alter perceptibly during that period.
Bibliography Citation
Maxwell, Nan L. and Frank L. Mott. "Trends in the Determinants of Early Childbearing." Population and Environment 9,2 (Summer 1987): 59-73.
39. Maxwell, Nan L.
Mott, Frank L.
Trends in the Determinants of Early Childbearing
Presented: Chicago, IL, Population Association of America Annual Meetings, April-May 1987
Cohort(s): NLSY79, Young Women
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Childbearing; Contraception; Fertility; First Birth; Mothers, Race; Racial Differences; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study uses data from the Young Women and NLSY cohorts to examine the extent to which socioeconomic background factors and race have changed in their ability to predict a first birth before age 19 between 1968 and 1980 for women aged 19 to 23. The authors find little support for their hypothesis that the increasing availability of contraception and abortion for young women from all social classes reduces the traditionally strong inverse association between social class and early childbearing. There is evidence that, even after controlling for changes in socioeconomic background factors, black young women are significantly more likely than their white counterparts to bear children before age 19 in 1980 and the relative gap between races in this regard did not alter perceptibly during that period.
Bibliography Citation
Maxwell, Nan L. and Frank L. Mott. "Trends in the Determinants of Early Childbearing." Presented: Chicago, IL, Population Association of America Annual Meetings, April-May 1987.
40. Menaghan, Elizabeth G.
Cooksey, Elizabeth C.
Mott, Frank L.
Nicotine Exposure before Birth and Children's Behavior Problems in Middle Childhood: Toward Understanding the Linkage
Working Paper, Department of Sociology and Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1998
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Birthweight; Child Health; Children, Adjustment Problems; Children, Behavioral Development; Cigarette Use (see Smoking); Deviance; Family Circumstances, Changes in; Family Environment; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Maternal Employment; Pre-natal Care/Exposure; Pre/post Natal Behavior; Pre/post Natal Health Care

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Also: presented: Chicago, IL, Population Association of America Meetings, April 1998

Using linked child-mother data from the National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth (NLSY) we examine the association between maternal smoking behavior during pregnancy and children's later levels of externalizing behavior problems at ages ten and eleven. We examine to what extent this association may reflect common correlates with associated maternal resources, skills, and characteristics, be a result of associated differences in the quality of current work and family circumstances, or reflect other indicators of poorer maternal attitudes and behaviors. We also evaluate whether part of this relationship is mediated through associated child physical health, especially respiratory, problems. We consider parallel arguments for effects of current maternal smoking, and also evaluate the potential mediational role of family home environments. Only a small part of this relationship appears to be mediated through associated child physical health problems, while there is some suggestion that smoking during pregnancy may reflect associated maternal life difficulties as well as more compromised family home environments.

Bibliography Citation
Menaghan, Elizabeth G., Elizabeth C. Cooksey and Frank L. Mott. "Nicotine Exposure before Birth and Children's Behavior Problems in Middle Childhood: Toward Understanding the Linkage." Working Paper, Department of Sociology and Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1998.
41. Menaghan, Elizabeth G.
Jekielek, Susan Marie
Mott, Frank L.
Cooksey, Elizabeth C.
Work and Family Circumstances and Child Trajectories: When (and for What) Does AFDC Receipt Matter?
Presented: Chicago, IL, Joint Center for Poverty Research, Pre-Conference on Family Process and Child Development in Low Income Families, May 7-8, 1998.
Also: http://www.jcpr.org/wp/WPprofile.cfm?ID=39.0
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Joint Center for Poverty Research
Keyword(s): Aid for Families with Dependent Children (AFDC); Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Family Circumstances, Changes in; Home Environment; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Maternal Employment; Mothers, Education; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Simultaneity

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper focuses on children's progress through middle childhood over a four year period, beginning with a synthetic cohort of children aged 6-7 and following them to ages 10-11. We have been particularly concerned with changes over time, seeking to link changing parental work and family circumstances with changes in the quality of parent-child interaction and with children's increases or decreases in behavior problems. In this preliminary set of analyses, we can take advantage of the longitudinal NLSY child data, and control for the initial level of child outcomes at the beginning of the study period. Thus, our main focus is on how temporal patterns of AFDC receipt are linked to changes in the quality of children's home environments, their reading skills, and their behavior. We ask three major questions. First, for the large sample of children aged 10 to 11 whom we have been following from ages 6-7, what are the patterns of AFDC receipt from year 1 through year 5? We describe those patterns, and correlate variations in AFDC receipt with the measures of maternal resources, work and family patterns over the same period. Second, are these patterns linked to three indicators of child outcomes: the quality of home environments, the child's reading ability, and the child's propensity to oppositional action (a subset of behavior problems), under varying controls? Third, following Greg Duncan's lead, we develop typologies that simultaneously consider AFDC receipt, family composition, mother's education, and mother's employment history. What are the frequencies of those types, and what are the linkages between these groups and the three child outcomes under varying sets of controls?
Bibliography Citation
Menaghan, Elizabeth G., Susan Marie Jekielek, Frank L. Mott and Elizabeth C. Cooksey. "Work and Family Circumstances and Child Trajectories: When (and for What) Does AFDC Receipt Matter?" Presented: Chicago, IL, Joint Center for Poverty Research, Pre-Conference on Family Process and Child Development in Low Income Families, May 7-8, 1998.
42. Menaghan, Elizabeth G.
Kowaleski-Jones, Lori
Mott, Frank L.
Impact of Social Stressors on Academic and Social Difficulties in Early Adolescence: Evidence from the NLSY Mothers and Children
Presented: Miami, FL, Population Association of America Meetings, May 1994
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Birthweight; Fathers, Absence; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Household Composition; Locus of Control (see Rotter Scale); Maternal Employment; Rotter Scale (see Locus of Control)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Bibliography Citation
Menaghan, Elizabeth G., Lori Kowaleski-Jones and Frank L. Mott. "Impact of Social Stressors on Academic and Social Difficulties in Early Adolescence: Evidence from the NLSY Mothers and Children." Presented: Miami, FL, Population Association of America Meetings, May 1994.
43. Menaghan, Elizabeth G.
Kowaleski-Jones, Lori
Mott, Frank L.
Parental Investment and Early Adolescent Behavior Problems: Evidence from NLSY Mothers and Children
Presented: Indianapolis, IN, Symposium on Social Capital and Child Development at the Society for Research in Child Development Biennial Meetings, April 1995
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD)
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Cognitive Development; Family Structure; Family Studies; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Human Capital; Maternal Employment; Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness; Parental Influences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

In describing social capital as a critical element in the formation of human capital, James Coleman calls attention to features of relationships between actors that help these relationships to serve as resources for individuals and groups. While Coleman emphasizes social capital in neighborhoods and community patterns, family relations themselves may be more or less organized to support family members' goals and actions. Coleman (1988) argues that such family social capital-as embodied in relations that are stable and dependable, marked by high frequency of interaction, and characterized by homogeneity of values and norms--is a resource enabling individuals to accomplish goals. In particular, parental efforts to develop positive bonds with their children--via support for cognitive development, warm interaction, and joint participation in activities--and to foster shared norms--via explicit discussion of parental expectations and inclusion of the child in rulemaking--should d ecrease their children's vulnerability to behavior problems and deviance. But such family social capital is not equally distributed among families. Given the importance of parent-child relationships for children's outcomes, we argue that it is critical to understand the social determinants of family interaction patterns, as well as to investigate how variations in the quality and character of relations among parents and children help to shape the behavioral choices that adolescent children make.
Bibliography Citation
Menaghan, Elizabeth G., Lori Kowaleski-Jones and Frank L. Mott. "Parental Investment and Early Adolescent Behavior Problems: Evidence from NLSY Mothers and Children." Presented: Indianapolis, IN, Symposium on Social Capital and Child Development at the Society for Research in Child Development Biennial Meetings, April 1995.
44. Menaghan, Elizabeth G.
Kowaleski-Jones, Lori
Mott, Frank L.
The Intergenerational Costs of Parental Social Stressors: Academic & Social Difficulties in Early Adolescence for Children of Young Mothers
Journal of Health and Social Behavior 38,1 (March 1997): 72-86.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2955362
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Children, Academic Development; Cognitive Development; Family Environment; Family Influences; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Marital Status; Maternal Employment; Mothers, Adolescent; Occupational Prestige; Parental Influences; Social Environment; Social Roles

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Social stressors embedded in parents' occupational and family roles have been shown to have effects on family interaction and the cognitive and emotional development of young children. Here we consider whether these patterns also hold for children in early adolescence. We study 1158 10-14-year-old children born to the early childbearers among the female respondents of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth cohort. We find that both poor quality of parental employment and low quality of mothers' relationships with their partners have adverse effects on the cognitive stimulation and maternal warmth children receive; living in informal unions is also associated with poorer parent-child interaction. These family interaction patterns in turn both buffer the effects of stressful family conditions and shape academic and behavior outcomes directly. Some work and family conditions interact in their effects: in particular, single mothering has less adverse effects on cognitive stimulation and behavior problems when mothers are employed in occupations providing higher complexity.The effects of current conditions are diminished but seldom eliminated when we control for possible selection effects by utilizing data from earlier waves to control for earlier levels of child problems. These findings suggest that current parental social stressors continue to have consequences for both academic and behavioral outcomes during early adolescence.
Bibliography Citation
Menaghan, Elizabeth G., Lori Kowaleski-Jones and Frank L. Mott. "The Intergenerational Costs of Parental Social Stressors: Academic & Social Difficulties in Early Adolescence for Children of Young Mothers." Journal of Health and Social Behavior 38,1 (March 1997): 72-86.
45. Menaghan, Elizabeth G.
Mott, Frank L.
Cooksey, Elizabeth C.
Work, Family Patterns, and Child Well Being: Tracing Consequences over Time
Presented: Toronto, Canada, Annual Meetings of the American Sociological Association, August 1997
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Behavioral Problems; Bullying/Victimization; Children, Well-Being; Family Characteristics; Family Circumstances, Changes in; Family Influences; Fathers, Absence; Fathers, Presence; Health, Mental; Maternal Employment; Mothers, Behavior; Peers/Peer influence/Peer relations

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Our overall research objective is to describe and explain the development, maintenance, and change in children's behavior problems during middle childhood, and subsequently to examine the implications of these patterns for early adolescent behavior. We focus on two major categories of problems: a) externalizing behavior that is troubling to others, especially aggressive and antisocial behavior; and b) internalizing behavior marked by withdrawal from interaction and depressed mood. In the research we report today, we focus exclusively on the former dimension, and study what we term "oppositional action"-outward acts of behavior that often have an antisocial element to them and reflect under-control of aggressive impulses, for example, bullying others, having trouble getting along with peers and teachers, and being restless, impulsive, and short-tempered. We analyze levels of oppositional action at ages ten and eleven, and changes in levels since ages six and seven, linking both level and change to maternal and child characteristics, current work and family circumstances, and changes in those circumstances over time (see conceptural model?).
Bibliography Citation
Menaghan, Elizabeth G., Frank L. Mott and Elizabeth C. Cooksey. "Work, Family Patterns, and Child Well Being: Tracing Consequences over Time." Presented: Toronto, Canada, Annual Meetings of the American Sociological Association, August 1997.
46. Menaghan, Elizabeth G.
Mott, Frank L.
Cooksey, Elizabeth C.
Jekielek, Susan Marie
Long Reach of the Job: Effects of Mothers' Work Experiences on Oppositional Action in Early Adolescence
Working Paper, Department of Sociology and Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1998
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Behavioral Problems; Employment; Family Circumstances, Changes in; Fathers, Absence; Maternal Employment; Mothers; Work Experience

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Also: Presented: Chicago, IL, Population Association of America Meetings, April 1998

While research has examined how maternal work and family patterns affect pre-school and younger children, we are less well informed about effects in early adolescence, and in particular, how changes in parents' work and family circumstances over time may alter their children's risks for behavior problems. in this analysis, we focus on one aspect of behavior problems, propensities to oppositional action, and study its trajectory from middle childhood (ages 6-7) to early adolescence (ages 10-11), linking this trajectory to maternal employment patterns over the same time period. We study these trajectories for a national sample of 1,917 children aged 10-11 drawn from the Child-Mother data set of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. This is a synthetic cohort constructed by pooling children aged 10-11 in 1990, 1992, and 1994. We focus on three features of maternal employment: the extensiveness of employment, as tapped by the proportion of weeks worked over the last four years; the st ability of employment, as tapped by the number of starts and stops in employment over that period; and the quality of employment, as tapped by the substantive complexity and opportunities for self-direction of the mother's occupation. We include statistical controls for maternal and child characteristics, as well as for family compositional patterns and spouse employment characteristics. We find that the key contrasts are between mothers with no employment at any point, those with intermittent employment, and those with continuous employment. Children of those never employed are most prone to oppositional behavior problems, while those whose mothers were continuously employed are least prone, even after stringent controls for associated human and social capital, family compositional patterns, and quality of employment. Our data also suggest that low to no maternal employment has more negative effects on children not living stably with their fathers over the past four years. The quality of employment is associated with more stable employment patterns, and we find no independent effect of employment quality on early adolescent outcomes once we take stability and extensiveness into account. Earlier levels of oppositional action (at ages 6-7) are strongly correlated with levels four years later (bivariate r += . 60); multivariate beta = +.52), but earlier levels are not consistently or significantly associated with employment patterns over the four year period, and controlling for those earlier levels does not substantially alter effects of maternal employment patterns previously observed. Thus, these negative impacts of stable non-employment and very low levels of employment persist even when earlier levels of behavior problems are controlled, suggesting that they represent increases over time, not simply persistence of higher levels established at earlier time points.

Bibliography Citation
Menaghan, Elizabeth G., Frank L. Mott, Elizabeth C. Cooksey and Susan Marie Jekielek. "Long Reach of the Job: Effects of Mothers' Work Experiences on Oppositional Action in Early Adolescence." Working Paper, Department of Sociology and Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1998.
47. Menaghan, Elizabeth G.
Mott, Frank L.
Cooksey, Elizabeth C.
Jekielek, Susan Marie
Work and Family Patterns: Effects Across Generations
Presented: East Lansing, MI, Social Capital Conference, April 1998.
Also: http://www.ssc.msu.edu/~internat/soccap/Abstracts.htm#menaghan
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Author
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Birthweight; Family Structure; Maternal Employment

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Recent research suggests that childhood and adolescent rates of behavior problems have been rising in the US over the past two decades. At the same time, family composition and parental, especially maternal, employment patterns have also been shifting. While research has focused on how maternal work and family patterns affect pre-school and younger children, we are less well informed about effects in early adolescence, and in particular, how stability and change in parents' work and family circumstances over time may alter their children's risks for behavior problems. In this analysis, we focus on one aspect of behavior problems, propensities to oppositional action, and study its trajectory from middle childhood (ages 6-7) to early adolescence (ages 10-11), linking this trajectory to maternal employment and family composition patterns over the same time period. We study these trajectories for a national sample of 1,917 children aged 10-11 drawn from the Child-Mother data set of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. This is a synthetic cohort constructed by pooling children aged 10-11 in 1990, 1992, and 1994. All multivariate models include controls for cohort membership to capture effects of unmeasured secular changes which may affect the cohorts differently.
Bibliography Citation
Menaghan, Elizabeth G., Frank L. Mott, Elizabeth C. Cooksey and Susan Marie Jekielek. "Work and Family Patterns: Effects Across Generations." Presented: East Lansing, MI, Social Capital Conference, April 1998.
48. Menaghan, Elizabeth G.
Mott, Frank L.
Cooksey, Elizabeth C.
Jekielek, Susan Marie
Work and Family Patterns: Effects Across Generations
Journal of Socio-Economics 29,6 (2000): 587-590.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1053535700001013
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Behavior; Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Behavioral Problems; Family Circumstances, Changes in; Family Size; Family Structure; Maternal Employment; Parenting Skills/Styles

Recent research suggests that childhood and adolescent rates of behavior problems have been rising in the US over the past two decades. At the same time, family composition and parental, especially maternal, employment patterns have also been shifting. While research has focused on how maternal work and family patterns affect pre-school and younger children, there is less information about effect in early adolescence, and in particular, how stability and change in parents' work and family circumstances over time may alter their children's risks for behavior problems. In this analysis, one aspect of behavior problems and propensities to oppositional action are focused on, and the trajectories for a national sample of 1,917 children aged 10-11 drawn from the Child-Mother data set of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth is studied.
Bibliography Citation
Menaghan, Elizabeth G., Frank L. Mott, Elizabeth C. Cooksey and Susan Marie Jekielek. "Work and Family Patterns: Effects Across Generations." Journal of Socio-Economics 29,6 (2000): 587-590.
49. Menaghan, Elizabeth G.
Mott, Frank L.
Jekielek, Susan Marie
Kowaleski-Jones, Lori
Children's Behavior Problems: Effects of Current Conditions and Maternal Resources
Presented: New York, NY, American Sociological Association, August 1996
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Children, Adjustment Problems; Children, Behavioral Development; Educational Attainment; Educational Returns; Fathers, Presence; Self-Esteem

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Explores how work & family circumstances shape young children's emotional well-being & behavior, & the extent to which parental resources buffer against adverse effects, using data from the National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth for a synthetic cohort of 2,343 children ages 6-7, who were born 1979 & 1986. Results suggest 3 aspects of current work & family circumstances are associated with lower levels of children's behavior problems: (1) the presence of the child's father in the family, (2) the mother being employed, & (3) among employed mothers, the mother working in an occupation that offers greater complexity. Maternal resources also matter: mothers with higher self-esteem, lower levels of youthful deviance, & who had avoided smoking during pregnancy had children with lower levels of behavior problems. These resources had directed effects on behavior problems when current work & family circumstances were controlled, & indirect effects through their impact s on curr ent work & family circumstances. Mothers' cognitive resources had no direct effects, but higher education helped to buffer the effects of presence/absence of the child's father. Higher cognitive resources were also associated with better current work & family circumstances. It is concluded that mothers' resources & their current work & family circumstances affect children's well-being; these effects persist despite stringent controls & are predominantly additive in form. From a policy perspective, these results suggest that improvements in current work & family circumstances can enhance children's well-being, even for children whose mothers have poorer emotional & cognitive resources. (Copyright 1996, Sociological Abstracts, Inc., all rights reserved.)
Bibliography Citation
Menaghan, Elizabeth G., Frank L. Mott, Susan Marie Jekielek and Lori Kowaleski-Jones. "Children's Behavior Problems: Effects of Current Conditions and Maternal Resources." Presented: New York, NY, American Sociological Association, August 1996.
50. Moon, Elizabeth A.
Mott, Frank L.
Poverty, Welfare, and Family Structure: Consequences for Children's Cognitive Development
Presented: Washington, DC, Annual Meetings of the Population Association of America, March 1997
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Aid for Families with Dependent Children (AFDC); Child Development; Cognitive Development; Family Structure; Human Capital; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT); Poverty; Racial Studies; Regions; Welfare

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Bibliography Citation
Moon, Elizabeth A. and Frank L. Mott. "Poverty, Welfare, and Family Structure: Consequences for Children's Cognitive Development." Presented: Washington, DC, Annual Meetings of the Population Association of America, March 1997.
51. Mott, Frank L.
A View from the Cradle: Household and Parental Characteristics and Behaviors from the Perspective of Young Children
Working Paper, Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, Columbus, 1986
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): Behavior; Child Care; Children; Family Structure; Fathers, Absence; Hispanics; Household Composition; Maternal Employment; Poverty

This report uses data from the 1984 (sixth wave) survey of the NLSY to describe the household structure and parental characteristics of about 4,400 children born to a national cross-section of American mothers 19 to 27 years of age. About 80 percent of these children were under the age of six and most of the rest were between ages six and nine. These children are representative of the first thirty percent of all children born to a typical contemporary cohort of American women entering the childbearing years. The children in this survey include about the first twenty-five percent of children born to white women, the first forty percent to Hispanic women, and the first fifty percent to black women. The home environment of the older children, those of school age, is typical of the home environment of younger elementary school age children who were born to adolescent mothers. The home environment of those below school age may be considered as representative of the homes of a normal cross-section of children, mostly born to women between the ages of 18 and 25. This study profiles the home situation of a national cross-section of children and, as the study details, suggests results considerably different from those which are typically presented using cross-sectional data for adult respondents. It focuses on the 95 percent of all children who are living with their mother.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L. "A View from the Cradle: Household and Parental Characteristics and Behaviors from the Perspective of Young Children." Working Paper, Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, Columbus, 1986.
52. Mott, Frank L.
Absent Fathers and Child Development: Emotional and Cognitive Effects at Ages Five to Nine
Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1993
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Birthweight; Child Development; Children, Adjustment Problems; Children, Behavioral Development; Children, Home Environment; Cognitive Ability; Cognitive Development; Divorce; Fathers, Absence; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Household Composition; Marriage; Parental Influences; Parental Marital Status; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Pre-natal Care/Exposure; Pre/post Natal Behavior; Pre/post Natal Health Care

This monograph presents the following information in eight chapters: An introduction and overview of the issues on marriage, divorce, and parental presence including a child's view of family. The research sample: who are the study children? Paternal presence and absence in the early years of life including patterning and availability of father substitutes. Differences between father-present and father-absent families. Paternal absence and childrens' behavior problem. Father's absence and child cognition: the cognitive assessments of father's absence and cognition. Father's absence and the home environment including individual home attributes and behaviors, and a child development summary. The last chapter includes a synthesis of what has been found and what it might mean.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L. Absent Fathers and Child Development: Emotional and Cognitive Effects at Ages Five to Nine. Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1993.
53. Mott, Frank L.
Child Care Use During the First Year of Life: Linkages with Early Child Development
Working Paper, Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, Columbus, 1989
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): Child Care; Children; General Assessment; Health Factors; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Maternal Employment; Memory for Location; Motor and Social Development (MSD); Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT); Tests and Testing

This paper has two interrelated objectives. First, it highlights the advantages and disadvantages of using a large sample national data set such as the NLSY child data for research on the consequences of early child care. Second, the strengths of such a large national data set have been utilized to examine whether or not there are any apparent overt consequences of early-in-life child care for the early childhood cognitive, social and physiological development of children. The three child outcome measures utilized were the Memory for Location (MEMLOC), Motor and Social Development (MSD), and Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test assessments (PPVT). As a generalization, it may be concluded that only limited overall associations are found between the various non-maternal child care arrangements and the MEMLOC and MSD child assessment outcomes. That is, non-maternal child care seems to have only limited effect--either positive or negative--on subsequent early child development. However, early child care does seem to be linked with subsequent performance on the PPVT. In particular, infant girls who receive early non-maternal care subsequently score higher on the PPVT than infant girls who received only maternal care. None of these non-maternal care advantages accrue to young boys. While not identical in terms of patterning or statistical strength, somewhat similar gender differences appear for the MEMLOC assessment. While not exactly a mirror image, evidence consistent with the above may also be extracted from some of the MSD equa- tions. There is systematic evidence that boys with a health problem fare better on the MSD assessment if their first year care arrangements are limited to maternal care. Other relative care, nonrelative care, and in and out of home non-maternal care discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L. "Child Care Use During the First Year of Life: Linkages with Early Child Development." Working Paper, Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, Columbus, 1989.
54. Mott, Frank L.
Data on Mothers and Children from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth Labor Market Experience
Working Paper, Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, Columbus, 1987
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): Children; Data Quality/Consistency; Mothers; NLS Description

These tables are intended to provide potential NLSY data users with some general information about the NLSY data set as well as a variety of sample sizes delimiting various subsets of the NLSY mother and child populations as of the 1986 survey round. The statistics in this report are unweighted sample estimates which may help prospective researchers determine whether or not the sample is appropriate for meeting their research needs. The tabulations should not be viewed as being representative of any national population group.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L. "Data on Mothers and Children from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth Labor Market Experience." Working Paper, Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, Columbus, 1987.
55. Mott, Frank L.
Developmental Effects of Infant Care: The Mediating Role of Gender and Health
Journal of Social Issues 47,2 (Summer 1991): 139-158.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1540-4560.1991.tb00292.x/abstract
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Plenum Publishing Corporation
Keyword(s): Birthweight; Child Care; Child Development; Child Health; Children, Academic Development; Children, Behavioral Development; Gender Differences; General Assessment; Geographical Variation; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Household Structure; Maternal Employment; Memory for Location; Motor and Social Development (MSD); Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT)

This research used the 1986 Merged Child-Mother Data File from the NLSY to explore how various forms of infant care in a child's first year were linked with scores at ages one-to-four on the Memory for Location, Motor and Social Development, and Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test measures. The extent to which these linkings were mediated by an infant's health and gender was examined and important distinctions were noted. In particular, healthy infant girls received some cognitive advantage by being cared for extensively by caretakers other than their mother during infancy, whereas infant boys with health problems gained socioemotionally by spending more time with their mothers. More generally, it was concluded that usually, the average young child's ability to cope intellectually and socioemotionally (as measured on the above scales) is not affected in major ways either positively or negatively by the generic nature of his or her child care arrangement.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L. "Developmental Effects of Infant Care: The Mediating Role of Gender and Health." Journal of Social Issues 47,2 (Summer 1991): 139-158.
56. Mott, Frank L.
Do Fathers Make a Difference? The Determinants and Consequences of Fathers' Absence from the Home of Younger Children
Book Prospectus, Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, October 1991
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): Children; Children, Home Environment; Fathers, Absence; Marital Dissolution; Marital Instability; Mothers

The traditional American family, encompassing two parents and two children represents only a modest proportion of all family units. This phenomenon is a reflection of many social, economic and demographic forces, not the least of which are the extraordinary recent increases in marital dissolution and the tendency of substantial proportions of women to have and raise children not only outside of formal marriage arrangements, but without having the father of the child (or children) present. While there is no doubt that raising children in a socially and psychologically less privileged environment has negative consequences for mother and children, the extent to which this is true for the contemporary generation of fatherless American children is at least partially open to question. Much of the available academic literature which examines the determinants and consequences--for mother and child--of marital "disruption" is based on intellectual and empirical premises more attuned to the family and social structure of prior generations. Thus, the implied consequences of fatherless homes are often based on somewhat dated notions of normative "correctness". To some extent, the tendency for many researchers to remain wedded to traditional concepts and methods is linked with data constraints. Most data sources are quite limiting in terms of defining relationship processes over time, because most research has focused on the association between the legal form of the parental relationship and its effect on the children rather than concentrating on the parent-child relationship. This research uses a unique data set, the NLSY, to explore several issues: First, the family experiences of children from their perspective and second, the independent effect of various father absence family forms on a child's intellectual and emotional development.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L. "Do Fathers Make a Difference? The Determinants and Consequences of Fathers' Absence from the Home of Younger Children." Book Prospectus, Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, October 1991.
57. Mott, Frank L.
Early Fertility Behavior Among American Youth: Evidence from the 1982 NLS of Labor Force Behavior of Youth
Presented: Dallas, TX, American Public Health Association, November 13-17, 1983
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Public Health Association
Keyword(s): Abortion; Adolescent Fertility; Behavior; Childbearing; Deviance; Educational Aspirations/Expectations; Fertility; Sexual Activity; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This article, using data from the fourth interview round (1982) of the NLSY, investigates the fertility and fertility related characteristics of the sample. First births, contraception use, desire to have children, sexual activity and abortion likelihood are all investigated, along with their relationship to age, color, educational aspirations, parents' education, religion, self esteem, drug use, socioeconomic status, and career orientations.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L. "Early Fertility Behavior Among American Youth: Evidence from the 1982 NLS of Labor Force Behavior of Youth." Presented: Dallas, TX, American Public Health Association, November 13-17, 1983.
58. Mott, Frank L.
Evaluation of Fertility Data and Preliminary Analytical Results from the 1983 (Round 5) Survey of the National Longitudinal Surveys of Work Experience of Youth
Working Paper, Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, Columbus, 1985
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): Abortion; Adolescent Fertility; Fertility; First Birth; High School Dropouts; Household Composition; Sexual Activity; Sexual Behavior

In the present report, the evaluations carried out with respect to the 1983 NLSY data were selectively updated and a number of analyses focusing on specific substantive issues were presented. A major objective of these analyses, which focused on (1) early school leaving and fertility, (2) early parity progression, and (3) fertility expectations, was to clarify issues relating to the quality of those data and to convey to other researchers some of the unique aspects of this longitudinal data set. All of these analyses have been revised and are available in revised form from the CHRR. One other major focus of the data evaluation was to examine the quality of the abortion records by comparing the original abortion reports with results from a confidential abortion reporting scheme in the 1984 survey round.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L. "Evaluation of Fertility Data and Preliminary Analytical Results from the 1983 (Round 5) Survey of the National Longitudinal Surveys of Work Experience of Youth." Working Paper, Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, Columbus, 1985.
59. Mott, Frank L.
Fertility-Related Data in the 1982 National Longitudinal Survey of Work Experience of Youth: An Evaluation of Data Quality & Some Preliminary Analytical Results
Report, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda MD, 1983
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development
Keyword(s): Abortion; Adolescent Fertility; Behavior; Birth Rate; Child Care; Contraception; Data Quality/Consistency; Fertility; Male Sample; Methods/Methodology; Sexual Activity; Teenagers; Wantedness

The quality of the fertility related data in the 1982 round of the NLSY is evaluated, and highlights of findings from these fertility data are summarized. The study specifies the potential magnitude of reporting errors, how these potential error levels are related to characteristics of the respondents, and the procedures used to clean up the fertility records. Differentials in period and cohort birth rates are also examined, as are sexual activity and contraception, birth wantedness, and pregnancy outcomes for selected respondent characteristics within cross tabular and multivariate frameworks. The multivariate results suggest the utility of a variety of background factors and more proximate respondent attitudes and behaviors for investigating a variety of adolescent and young adult fertility related attitudes and behavior.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L. "Fertility-Related Data in the 1982 National Longitudinal Survey of Work Experience of Youth: An Evaluation of Data Quality & Some Preliminary Analytical Results." Report, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda MD, 1983.
60. Mott, Frank L.
Looking Backward: Post Hoc Reflections on Longitudinal Surveys
In: Looking at Lives: American Longitudinal Studies of the Twentieth Century. E. Phelps, F. F. Furstenberg, Jr., and A. Colby eds. New York, NY: Russell Sage Foundation, 2002
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLS General, NLSY79
Publisher: Russell Sage Foundation
Keyword(s): Life Course; Longitudinal Surveys; Overview, Child Assessment Data

The impact of long-term longitudinal studies on the landscape of 20th century social and behavioral science cannot be overstated. The field of life course studies has grown exponentially since its inception in the 1950s, and now influences methodologies as well as expectations for all academic research. Looking at Lives offers an unprecedented "insider's view" into the intentions, methods, and findings of researchers engaged in some of the 20th century's landmark studies. In this volume, eminent American scholars -- many of them pioneers in longitudinal studies -- provide frank and illuminating insights into the difficulties and the unique scientific benefits of mounting studies that track people's lives over a long period of time.

Looking at Lives includes studies from a range of disciplines, including psychology, sociology, and education, which together cover a span of more than fifty years. The contributors pay particular attention to the changing historical, cultural, and scientific context of their work, as well as the theoretical and methodological changes that have occurred in their fields over decades...[Copyright, Russell Sage Foundation, 2002]

Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L. "Looking Backward: Post Hoc Reflections on Longitudinal Surveys" In: Looking at Lives: American Longitudinal Studies of the Twentieth Century. E. Phelps, F. F. Furstenberg, Jr., and A. Colby eds. New York, NY: Russell Sage Foundation, 2002
61. Mott, Frank L.
Male Data Collection: Inferences from the National Longitudinal Surveys
Report, Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, February 1998
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): Data Quality/Consistency; Fertility; Gender Differences; Marriage; NLS Description; Sample Selection

Contents of this report include the following sections: Male data collection: Inferences from the NLSY. History of the NLS. Some caveats and data collection insights. Selecting the NLSY sample. Survey round completion rates: gender variations. Issues relating to item non-completion. Comparing spousal responses: NLSY couples married in 1979. Insights regarding gender differences in marriage and fertility reports. Gender differences in the timing of selected sections in the 1994 NLSY79 survey round, Summary and recommendations.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L. "Male Data Collection: Inferences from the National Longitudinal Surveys." Report, Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, February 1998.
62. Mott, Frank L.
Paternal Absence from the Home: Consequences for Early Childhood Cognitive Development
Presented: Santa Monica, CA, RAND Conference on Economic and Demographic Aspects of Intergenerational Relations, 1992
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: RAND
Keyword(s): Behavioral Problems; Child Development; Children, Academic Development; Children, Behavioral Development; Fathers; Fathers, Absence; Fathers, Biological; Gender Differences; General Assessment; Household Composition; Maternal Employment; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT); Racial Differences; Tests and Testing

This study uses data from the 1979 through 1986 waves of the NLSY and linked child assessment data to explore associations between a father's absence from the home and the cognitive development of children between the ages of three and seven. The research describes in detail linkages between various paternal-absence family forms (e.g., visitation in comparison with a "new man" present in comparison with no man present; father never present in comparison with father previously present) and a child's scores on the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test and the PIAT reading recognition, comprehension and mathematics assessments controlling for a wide range of maternal and post-paternal absence family factors, testing a number of hypotheses suggested by the literature as potentially important predictors of child cognitive development. This includes (but is not limited to) examining the relevance of father presence or absence per se, the extent to which a visiting father or a new man in the home can moderate (or exacerbate) the effect of a biological father's non-residence and whether a father's recent absenting in comparison with never having been present makes a difference. Gender and racial variations are explored. Among the results: (1) a father's absence from the home shows only limited association with younger children's cognitive development even without any controls for background factors which can be anticipated to be associated both with father's absence and child cognition; (2) controlling for child behavior problems does not affect the association between father's absence and cognition in any way; (3) father's absence does not appear to adversely impact on young boys mathematical competence (it does adversely effect black girls); and (4) there is systematic evidence that continuing contact with an absent biological father is a preferable situation for white girls in comparison with living in an environment which includes a new man in the home.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L. "Paternal Absence from the Home: Consequences for Early Childhood Cognitive Development." Presented: Santa Monica, CA, RAND Conference on Economic and Demographic Aspects of Intergenerational Relations, 1992.
63. Mott, Frank L.
Patterning of Child Assessment Completion Rates in the NLSY: 1986-1996
Working Paper, Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, November 1998.
Also: http://www.nlsinfo.org/usersvc/Child-Young-Adult/Mott-PatterningChildAssessCompletionRates98.pdf
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Data Quality/Consistency; Demography; Family Environment; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Tests and Testing

INTRODUCTION: Since 1986, with the support of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), all the children of the interviewed female respondents in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79) have biennially completed a varies of cognitive and socio-emotional assessments. (See the brief bibliography at the end of this document for several publications that describe both the NLSY main and Child data in some detail). To date, several hundred research papers have been completed that examine connections between the children's family environment and how they performed on these tests. As is detailed below, in many instances, children have been repeatedly given the same assessments. In some instances, the children are directly assessed, whereas in other instances, information about the children is collected directly from the mothers. Finally, beginning in 1994, much of the Child data collection changed from a paper and pencil mode to computer assisted personal interviews. Additionally, at various times over the decade, funds available for the Child data collection was more constrained then at other times This evaluation will attempt to clarify the degree to which these issues have impacted on the quality of the Child Assessment data collection. EVALUATION PROCEDURES: In this paper, we examine the patterning of completion rates on selected NLSY Child Assessments over the 1986 to 1996 period. We focus in particular on three assessments, the PIAT, Mathematics and Reading Tests, and the Behavior Problems scale. These three assessments were chosen for specific reasons. First, they are assessments that arc completed by age-eligible children in all the years in which they are eligible. It was therefore possible to explore attrition patterns for the same children for a series of consecutive assessment rounds. With respect to the Behavior Problems scale, all children age four and over (age 4 through 14 in 1994 and 1986) are eligible for thi s mother-completed assessment. The mother is asked a series of 28 questions about her child s behavior, and records her choices in a paper instrument. The PIAT assessments have been administered biennially to all children age 5 and over (5 through 11 beginning in 1994) in all the survey years they were age-eligible. Thus, for most children, we have multiple survey points that they were eligible to have the assessments administered permitting a careful longitudinal examination of the extent to which completion patterns for the same children arc predictable on the basis of demographic priors and prior completion patterns.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L. "Patterning of Child Assessment Completion Rates in the NLSY: 1986-1996." Working Paper, Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, November 1998.
64. Mott, Frank L.
Racial Differences in Female Labor Force Participation: Trends and Implications for the Future
Urban and Social Change Review 11 (1978): 21-27
Cohort(s): Mature Women, Young Women
Publisher: Boston College
Keyword(s): Aid for Families with Dependent Children (AFDC); Divorce; Earnings; Marital Disruption; Quits; Racial Differences; Urbanization/Urban Living

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The author examines certain aspects of racial convergence in labor force behavior and projects implications for the future. The labor force participation of white women has increased significantly, particularly for women of childbearing age. However, black women demonstrate a declining pattern of participation (except young married blacks). Most blacks who drop out of the labor force are those who have limited education and earn relatively low wages. It is probable that the labor force participation of white and black women will approach equality in the future as their education becomes similar and the participation of white women continues to increase. This article also appears in: Working Women and Families, K. Feinstein, ed., Beverly Hills, Sage Publications, 1979.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L. "Racial Differences in Female Labor Force Participation: Trends and Implications for the Future." Urban and Social Change Review 11 (1978): 21-27.
65. Mott, Frank L.
Racial Differences in Female Labor-Force Participation: Trends and Implications for the Future
Report, Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, 1978
Cohort(s): Mature Women, Young Women
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): Labor Force Participation; Racial Differences

This paper examines certain aspects of the racial differences in female labor-force participation using the Young Women and Mature Women NLS data sets.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L. "Racial Differences in Female Labor-Force Participation: Trends and Implications for the Future." Report, Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, 1978.
66. Mott, Frank L.
Selected Mother and Child Tabulations from the 1984 (Sixth Wave) Survey of the National Longitudinal Survey of Work Experience of Youth
Report, Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, Columbus, July 1986
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): Age at First Birth; Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Birthweight; Children; Current Population Survey (CPS) / CPS-Fertility Supplement; Fathers, Absence; Fertility; First Birth; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Household Composition; Income; Marital Status; Maternal Employment; Mothers, Education; Pre-natal Care/Exposure; Pre/post Natal Behavior; Pre/post Natal Health Care; Racial Differences

These tabulations, based on the 1984 NLSY, provide potential data users with sample sizes and some basic statistics relating to the fertility experience and fertility profiles of the young women in the sample. Comparisons are made with Current Population Survey results.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L. "Selected Mother and Child Tabulations from the 1984 (Sixth Wave) Survey of the National Longitudinal Survey of Work Experience of Youth." Report, Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, Columbus, July 1986.
67. Mott, Frank L.
Sons, Daughters and Fathers' Absence: Differentials in Father-Leaving Probabilities and in Home Environments
Journal of Family Issues 15,1 (March 1994): 97-128.
Also: http://jfi.sagepub.com/content/15/1/97.abstract
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Age at First Birth; Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Birthweight; Fathers, Absence; Fathers, Biological; Fathers, Leaving; Gender Differences; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Income; Maternal Employment; Mothers, Education; Pre-natal Care/Exposure; Pre/post Natal Behavior; Pre/post Natal Health Care

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, this research examines the extent to which the presence or absence of biological fathers from the home is associated with gender differences in the presence or absence of children and gender differences in the home environment encountered by children. For a large national sample of children between the ages of 5 and 9, the results suggest that for White families: (a) fathers are more likely to be present in the home if the child is male; and (b) home environmental advantages that boys appear to have in two-parent households are not apparent in female-headed households. For White families, White single parenthood is clearly linked with a poorer quality environment; nonetheless, it is more equalitarian in terms of boys and girls being similarly socialized. The results for Black children are less systematic, although there is some suggestion that girls lose a modest relative advantage in home environment that they have over boys in father-present homes.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L. "Sons, Daughters and Fathers' Absence: Differentials in Father-Leaving Probabilities and in Home Environments." Journal of Family Issues 15,1 (March 1994): 97-128.
68. Mott, Frank L.
Teen Parenting: Implications for the Mother and Child Generations
Presented: Columbus OH, The Justice for Children Project Conference, Ohio State University, November 1995
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: The Ohio State University
Keyword(s): Childbearing, Adolescent; Children, Well-Being; Cohabitation; Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness; Parenting Skills/Styles; Sexual Activity; Teenagers

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper examines the special problem of teen parenting and issues which will help examine the needs of children, particularly those growing up in disadvantaged environments. The ambiguity in the title focuses on two clearly inseparable issues: the problems and issues facing teen parents and their children--the problems of children raising children. The issue of the well-being of adolescents and their children cannot be effectively discussed outside of the context of the early sexual activity actually happening now, and how this may differ from what was true only a few decades ago. The issue of early sexual activity is discussed within a social context and suggestion on how the issue may be intimately linked with the well-being of both young mothers and their children are presented.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L. "Teen Parenting: Implications for the Mother and Child Generations." Presented: Columbus OH, The Justice for Children Project Conference, Ohio State University, November 1995.
69. Mott, Frank L.
Teen Parenting: Implications for the Mother and Child Generations
Ohio State Law Journal 57,2 (1996): 469-478
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Moritz College of Law
Keyword(s): Childbearing, Adolescent; Children, Well-Being; Cohabitation; Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness; Parenting Skills/Styles; Sexual Activity; Teenagers

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper examines the special problem of teen parenting and issues which will help examine the needs of children, particularly those growing up in disadvantaged environments. The ambiguity in the title focuses on two clearly inseparable issues: the problems and issues facing teen parents and their children--the problems of children raising children. The issue of the well-being of adolescents and their children cannot be effectively discussed outside of the context of the early sexual activity actually happening now, and how this may differ from what was true only a few decades ago. The issue of early sexual activity is discussed within a social context and suggestion on how the issue may be intimately linked with the well-being of both young mothers and their children are presented.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L. "Teen Parenting: Implications for the Mother and Child Generations." Ohio State Law Journal 57,2 (1996): 469-478.
70. Mott, Frank L.
The Employment Revolution: Young American Women In the 1970's
Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1982
Cohort(s): Young Men, Young Women
Publisher: MIT Press
Keyword(s): Career Patterns; Educational Attainment; Fertility; Husbands, Influence; Life Cycle Research; Marital Dissolution; Sex Roles; Siblings; Work History

Changing female work behavior has been intimately intertwined with changes in how both men and women view the roles of women in society. The authors provide insights into why women choose to work outside the home. Most prior empirical research has been rather narrowly focused on economic considerations, but motivations for women's work are much more complex. Chapter 1 considers the extent to which the changing employment profile of the young adult female population has been paralleled by a dramatic demographic transition. In chapter 2, records of brothers and sisters were matched to show how family background can work for or against educational and early career success. Chapter 3 more directly tests the link between a woman's family and work intentions and behaviors and how this link reflects her earlier experience. The need for including both economic and noneconomic orientations in evaluating women's work motivations is clarified more directly in chapter 4, which combines data from mother-daughter pairs. Chapter 5 continues earlier research that documented how relatively large proportions of women now retain close labor force ties at those life-cycle points when traditionally women left employment. Chapter 6 documents the effect changing attitudes have had on recent escalation in female work activity. Chapter 7 focuses on several different issues but emphasizes the invariance of many women's work activity in the face of other events, in this instance divorce and remarriage.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L. The Employment Revolution: Young American Women In the 1970's. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1982.
71. Mott, Frank L.
The Impact of Father's Absence from the Home on Subsequent Cognitive Development of Younger Children: Linkages Between Socio-Emotional and Cognitive Well-Being
Presented: Pittsburgh, PA, American Sociological Association Annual Meetings, August 1992
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Behavioral Problems; Children, Well-Being; Fathers, Absence; General Assessment; Household Composition; Maternal Employment; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Pre/post Natal Behavior; Pre/post Natal Health Care

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper uses data from the 1979 through 1988 rounds of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth and accompanying child supplements to explore linkages between a father's absenting himself from the home during a child's early years of life and subsequent socio-emotional and cognitive development (as measured by scores on a Behavior Problems index and PIAT mathematics and reading assessments. The children in the sample were all born between the 1979 and 1983 survey rounds to a national sample of women who were 14 to 21 on January 1, 1979; the children were between five and eight years of age. Systematic patterns of socio-emotional and cognitive disadvantage associated with a fathers absence per se were most pronounced for white boys. Additionally, for all except black girls, father-absent children who did not have access to a significant father figure scored lower than their counterparts on a Behavior Problems index. From a statistical perspective, significant associations between overall detrimental behavior problem scores and lesser cognitive development were found; however, in a substantive sense, these linkages were modest. To the extent that emotional-cognitive linkages are mediated by father's absence, commonalities are most likely to reflect common socio-economic origins-linked with maternal education, intelligence and economic well-being.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L. "The Impact of Father's Absence from the Home on Subsequent Cognitive Development of Younger Children: Linkages Between Socio-Emotional and Cognitive Well-Being." Presented: Pittsburgh, PA, American Sociological Association Annual Meetings, August 1992.
72. Mott, Frank L.
The Impact of Father's Absence from the Home on Subsequent Maternally Reported Behavior Problems of Younger Children
Report, Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1991
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Behavioral Problems; Child Development; Children; Children, Behavioral Development; Fathers; Fathers, Absence; Fathers, Influence; Gender Differences; General Assessment; Household Composition; Maternal Employment; Pre-natal Care/Exposure; Pre/post Natal Behavior; Pre/post Natal Health Care; Racial Differences

This paper focuses specially on the consequences of the father's absence for how a child scores on an overall Behavior Problems Index as well as how he or she scores on a number of subscales of this assessment which purport to measure a children's tendencies to be antisocial, anxious-depressed, headstrong, hyperactive, dependent or to be excessively involved in peer conflict.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L. "The Impact of Father's Absence from the Home on Subsequent Maternally Reported Behavior Problems of Younger Children." Report, Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1991.
73. Mott, Frank L.
The NLS Mature Women's Cohort: A Socioeconomic Overview
In: Women's Changing Roles at Home and on the Job: National Commission for Manpower Policy, Special Report No: 26. Washington DC: U.S. GPO, 1978
Cohort(s): Mature Women, Young Women
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Attitudes; Earnings; Employment; Fertility; Income; Labor Force Participation; Racial Differences; Schooling; Work Attitudes

This study of young and mature women examines trends in labor force behavior and attitudes between 1967 and 1972. Included are separate racial analyses of fertility, labor force employment, income, earnings and work and family attitudes for the two NLS cohorts. The study concludes that there are major differences between black and white female labor force trends with black participation declining and white participation increasing in recent years. The black decline primarily reflects labor force withdrawal of less skilled and educated women. The black women withdrawing from the labor force do not have work attitudes significantly more negative than their black and white working counterparts.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L. "The NLS Mature Women's Cohort: A Socioeconomic Overview" In: Women's Changing Roles at Home and on the Job: National Commission for Manpower Policy, Special Report No: 26. Washington DC: U.S. GPO, 1978
74. Mott, Frank L.
The NLS Mature Women's Cohort: A Socioeconomic Overview
Presented: Washington, DC, Secretary of Labor's Invitational Conference on the National Longitudinal Survey of Mature Women, January 26, 1978.
Also: http://www.eric.ed.gov/PDFS/ED155344.pdf
Cohort(s): Mature Women, Young Women
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Earnings; Employment; Fertility; Schooling; Work Attitudes

Data collected from 1967 to 1972 during the National Longitudinal Surveys was used to examine the labor force behavior of the mature women's cohort (women who were thirty to forty-four years old in 1967) as well as their attitudes toward work and home. The findings include the following: while white women increased their labor force participation levels, black women decreased theirs; since black labor force participation rates were higher than white levels in 1967, the net result was a convergence in rates between the races over the five-year period, particularly for women who were separated or divorced; black employed women greatly improved their earnings between 1966 and 1971; black women showed overall shifts toward more positive work attitudes but not to the extent that white women did; and whereas the work attitudes of white working women were much more positive than the attitudes of their nonworking counterparts, black women not at work felt as strongly as black women at work that work was necessary. (This paper includes fifteen tables of data.) (EM)
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L. "The NLS Mature Women's Cohort: A Socioeconomic Overview." Presented: Washington, DC, Secretary of Labor's Invitational Conference on the National Longitudinal Survey of Mature Women, January 26, 1978.
75. Mott, Frank L.
The NLSY Children 1992: Description and Evaluation
Report, Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1998
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Memory for Digit Span (WISC) - also see Digit Span; Motor and Social Development (MSD); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT); Self-Perception Profile for Children (SPPC); Temperament; Verbal Memory (McCarthy Scale)

This report describes the child assessment data collected in the 1992 (fourteenth) round of the NLSY.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L. "The NLSY Children 1992: Description and Evaluation." Report, Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1998.
76. Mott, Frank L.
The Pace of Repeated Childbearing among Young American Mothers
Family Planning Perspectives 18,1 (January-February 1986): 5-7+9-12.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2135193
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Alan Guttmacher Institute
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Age at First Birth; Family Background and Culture; Fertility; First Birth; Hispanics; Marital Status; Racial Differences; Wantedness

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Women who give birth at ages 16 and younger are more likely to bear a second child within the next two years than women who have their first child at ages 17-18 or at ages 19-22. However, there are important racial and ethnic differences in the likelihood of rapid repeated childbearing. Among whites, age at first birth has little effect on the proportions who have a second birth quickly; but among blacks, it has a significant inverse effect, with younger women more likely than older women to have a second child quickly. At nearly all ages at first birth, Hispanic mothers are more likely than either whites or blacks to have a second birth soon after the first. While the youngest black mothers (16 and under) are more likely than the youngest whites to have a rapid second birth, the oldest white mothers (19-22) are more likely than the oldest blacks. Socioeconomic background, marital status at first birth, and wantedness of the first birth also affect the pace of repeated childbearing. Compared with young mothers whose own mothers are high school graduates, those whose mothers are dropouts are more likely to have a second child within two years. Multivariate analysis is used to determine whether age at first birth independently affects the probability of a rapid second birth once the effect of parental education, marital status, wantedness of the first birth and other variables are controlled. The analysis shows that age at first birth exerts a significant independent effect on the pattern of repeated childbearing among all women, and that major racial and ethnic variations remain in that pattern.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L. "The Pace of Repeated Childbearing among Young American Mothers." Family Planning Perspectives 18,1 (January-February 1986): 5-7+9-12.
77. Mott, Frank L.
The Patterning of Female Teenage Sexual Behavior and its Relationship to Early Fertility
Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, May 1984
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): Abortion; Adolescent Fertility; Behavior; Contraception; Educational Aspirations/Expectations; Family Background and Culture; Fertility; Religious Influences; Sexual Activity; Sexual Behavior; Wantedness

Revised version of a paper presented to the Annual Meetings of the American Public Health Association, Dallas TX, November 1983. This paper uses data from the 1979 through 1982 rounds of the NLSY to examine the relevance of early background and more proximate factors as determinants of a range of fertility related outcomes for a nationally representative sample of young American women between the ages of 17 and 20 in 1982. The principal objective was to determine whether or not the patterning of these fertility-related outcomes (which include sexual activity, contraception, early pregnancy or childbirth, abortion, wantedness of first birth or pregnancy) fell into any coherent framework. The results are strongly consistent with the notion that generalizable anti-natalist behavior patterns can be related to seemingly disparate social and psychological origins. More traditional background orientation such as religiousity and stable family background are associated with early anti-natalist tendencies as are less traditional orientations such as striving for post-graduate education or viewing non-home roles for women as desirable. However, the mechanisms whereby lower fertility is achieved varies between young women who have these different orientations.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L. The Patterning of Female Teenage Sexual Behavior and its Relationship to Early Fertility. Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, May 1984.
78. Mott, Frank L.
The Socioeconomic Status of Households Headed by Women: Results from the National Longitudinal Surveys
R and D Monograph 72. Washington, DC: US Department of Labor, 1979
Cohort(s): Mature Women, Young Women
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Divorce; Family Income; Marital Disruption; Socioeconomic Status (SES); Widows

A brief narrative description of the journal article, document, or resource. A study of the socioeconomic status of households headed by women was conducted based upon data obtained from the National Longitudinal Surveys (NLS) of Labor Market Experience. (Since the mid-1960s NLS has been following labor market experiences of four cohorts of persons including male and female youth and mature men and women.) This study used data from both the younger cohort of women (aged 14-24 when first interviewed) and the older cohort of women (ages 30-44 when first interviewed). Each of the cohorts included about 5,000 individuals, with an overrepresentation of blacks in each. The findings indicated that marital disruption is an economic disaster to many women. On average, family income is cut in half during te transition year when divorce, separation, or death of husband occurs. Also pointed out was that black female heads of households are more severely disadvantaged in the labor market than are whites. Black women heading households are less likely to be employed. The transition from marriage to head of household usually results in an increase in employment for mature white women, but a decline for blacks. Moreover, black women who are working hold lower status jobs than their white counterparts. Overall, the economic differences between mature black and white women heads of households reflected that black women were less likely to have completed high school and more likely to have a health problem limiting the amount or kind of work they could do. (Author/BM) Source of the abstract: ERIC or Author; prior to 2005, abstractor initials appeared at the end of the abstract.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L. The Socioeconomic Status of Households Headed by Women: Results from the National Longitudinal Surveys. R and D Monograph 72. Washington, DC: US Department of Labor, 1979.
79. Mott, Frank L.
Utility of the HOME-SF Scale for Child Development Research in a Large National Longitudinal Survey: The National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 Cohort
Parenting: Science and Practice 4, 2-3 (April-September 2004): 259-270.
Also: http://www.parentingscienceandpractice.com/Past_Contents/V4_2_3/v4_2_3.htm
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates ==> Taylor & Francis
Keyword(s): Children, Home Environment; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Overview, Child Assessment Data; Scale Construction

Permission to reprint the abstract has been denied by the publisher.

Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L. "Utility of the HOME-SF Scale for Child Development Research in a Large National Longitudinal Survey: The National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 Cohort." Parenting: Science and Practice 4, 2-3 (April-September 2004): 259-270.
80. Mott, Frank L.
Welfare Incidence and Welfare Dependency Among American Women: A Longitudinal Examination
Report, Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, February 1983
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): Employment; Family Influences; Welfare

This research uses data from the NLS of Young Women, 1968-1980, to measure the incidence and intensity of welfare attachment. In addition to examining the propensity of young women and their families to repeatedly receive welfare, both within and across generations, the research examines variations in short and longer term welfare receipt by race, family status and socioeconomic background. The results indicate that while relatively large proportions of women require welfare assistance at some time, a relatively small proportion of women account for a large part of the welfare case load. Family and employment considerations both are important predictors of longer term welfare attachment for both black and white women. Consistent with evidence from other research, the results suggest that the probability of subsequently leaving the welfare rolls declines sharply as duration of time on the rolls increases. Also, there is only limited support for the notion that a propensity to be on welfare is transmitted across generations. Finally, the results indicate that the greater propensity for black women to receive welfare reflects for the most part differences in family and socioeconomic characteristics between the races. There is no support for the thesis that black families are more likely to repeatedly receive welfare after controlling for socioeconomic and demographic differences.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L. "Welfare Incidence and Welfare Dependency Among American Women: A Longitudinal Examination." Report, Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, February 1983.
81. Mott, Frank L.
When Is a Father Really Gone: Patterning of Father-Child Contact in Father-Absent Homes of Young Children Born to Adolescent and Young Adult Mothers
Report, Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1989
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): Fathers and Children; Fathers, Absence; Fathers, Biological; Fathers, Influence; Household Composition

This research utilizes data from the 1979 through 1986 rounds of the National Longitudinal Survey of Work Experience of Youth to (1) examine the dynamics of father's presence/absence during a child's first few years of life and (2) consider the extent to which overt father present/absence statistics mask a continuing contact with the child's father or other potential father figure.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L. "When Is a Father Really Gone: Patterning of Father-Child Contact in Father-Absent Homes of Young Children Born to Adolescent and Young Adult Mothers." Report, Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1989.
82. Mott, Frank L.
When is a Father Really Gone? Paternal-Child Contact in Father-Absent Homes
Demography 27,4 (November 1990): 499-517.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/v537607144253572/
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Fathers and Children; Fathers, Absence; Fathers, Biological; Fathers, Influence; Household Composition

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Utilizing data from the 1979-1986 NLSY, this paper examines the dynamics of father's presence-absence during a child's first few years of life and considers the extent to which overt father presence/absence statistics mask a continuing contact with potential father/father figures. This includes tendencies of children to have frequent contact with "absent" fathers or to have a "new" father figure in the home--be he a spouse or partner of the child's mother or some other designated adult "father figure." The paper documents the extent to which (1) substantial proportions of children born to younger mothers never have had a biological father residing in the home, (2) "net" levels of fathers' absence at various post birth points mask significant "gross" flows of fathers in and out, and (3) large proportions of children in homes where the biological father is not present have potentially significant contact with absent fathers or new father figures, be they spouses or partners of the child's mother or some other significant adult. Racial differences in these patterns are considered.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L. "When is a Father Really Gone? Paternal-Child Contact in Father-Absent Homes." Demography 27,4 (November 1990): 499-517.
83. Mott, Frank L.
Women, Work, and Family: Dimensions of Change in American Society
Lexington, MA: Lexington Books, 1978
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: Jossey-Bass
Keyword(s): Children; Educational Aspirations/Expectations; Educational Attainment; Job Training; Marital Disruption; Socioeconomic Status (SES); Unemployment

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Chapter 1, Introduction and Overview, Frank L. Mott; Chapter 2, Young Women's Decisions to Attend College: Desires, Expectations, and Realizations, Steven H. Sandell; Chapter 3, Pregnancy, Motherhood, and Work Activity, Frank L. Mott and David Shapiro; Chapter 4, Sex Segregation in the Labor Market: An Analysis of Young College Women's Occupational Preferences, Patricia K. Brito and Carol L. Jusenius; Chapter 5, Work Attachment, Investments in Human Capital, and the Earnings of Young Women, David Shapiro and Timothy J. Carr; Chapter 6, The Migration of Young Families: An Economic Perspective, Steven H. Sandell and Peter J. Koenig; Chapter 7, The Causes and Consequences of Marital Breakdown, Frank L. Mott and Sylvia F. Moore; Chapter 8, Highlights of the Volume and Some Policy Implications, Frank L. Mott. See abstract for Mott, Years for Decision, Volume 4 (1978); R&D Monograph 24. Washington: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1978.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L. Women, Work, and Family: Dimensions of Change in American Society. Lexington, MA: Lexington Books, 1978.
84. Mott, Frank L.
Baker, Paula C.
Evaluation of the 1989 Child-Care Supplement in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth
Report NLS 92-6, Washington DC: U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, October 1989.
Also: http://stats.bls.gov/ore/abstract/nl/nl890020.htm
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Child Care; Contraception; Data Quality/Consistency; Mothers; Research Methodology

This report assesses a variety of data quality issues in the special 1989 NLSY child care supplement. Funded by the Department of Health and Human Services, the 1989 round of the NLSY included a special data collection designed to obtain maternal reports of current and usual child care arrangements and to assess the following three data quality issues: (1) the extent to which information collected on primary and secondary child care arrangements accurately reflects all child care use; (2) the extent to which mothers were able to reconstruct a retrospective of every child care arrangement used for at least 10 hours per week since the date of last interview; and (3) the validity and usefulness of a set of questions dealing with the mother's attitudes towards child care and the flexibility of available child care arrangements in meeting unusual or emergency situations. Data were collected from 347 mothers who were interviewed during the first month of the survey round. The report summarizes results of the special survey and presents recommendations for future child care data collections.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L. and Paula C. Baker. "Evaluation of the 1989 Child-Care Supplement in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth." Report NLS 92-6, Washington DC: U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, October 1989.
85. Mott, Frank L.
Baker, Paula C.
Evaluation of the 1989 Child-Care Supplement in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth
Report, Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1989
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): Child Care; Data Quality/Consistency; Mothers

Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L. and Paula C. Baker. "Evaluation of the 1989 Child-Care Supplement in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth." Report, Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1989.
86. Mott, Frank L.
Baker, Paula C.
Haurin, R. Jean
Marsiglio, William
Fertility Related Data in the 1982 National Longitudinal Survey of Work Experience of Youth: An Evaluation of Data Quality and Some Preliminary Analytical Results
Report, Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1983
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): Abortion; Behavior; Birth Rate; Child Care; Contraception; Deviance; Fertility; Male Sample; Methods/Methodology; Sexual Activity; Sexual Behavior; Wantedness

This report evaluates the quality of the fertility-related data in the 1982 round of the NLSY and summarizes highlights of findings from these fertility data. The evaluation indicates that the overall quality of the female live birth information is equivalent to that of the Current Population Survey, that the abortion data is significantly under-reported, and that the other fertility-related information appears equivalent in quality to that of other available data. The quality of the male birth records are inferior to those of the female respondents and should be used with greater care by fertility researchers using this data set. The report specifies the potential magnitude of reporting errors, how these potential error levels are related to characteristics of the respondents, and the procedures used to clean up the fertility records. The analytical sections of the report examine differentials in period and cohort birth rates, sexual activity and contraception, birth wantedness, and pregnancy outcomes for selected respondent characteristics within cross-tabular and multivariate frameworks. Characteristics considered include race and ethnicity, religion, education, and various aspects of family stability, social class, and geographic residence. The multivariate results suggest the utility of a variety of background factors and more proximate respondent attitudes and behaviors for investigating a variety of adolescent and young adult fertility-related attitudes and behavior.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L., Paula C. Baker, R. Jean Haurin and William Marsiglio. "Fertility Related Data in the 1982 National Longitudinal Survey of Work Experience of Youth: An Evaluation of Data Quality and Some Preliminary Analytical Results." Report, Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1983.
87. Mott, Frank L.
Cooksey, Elizabeth C.
Hango, Darcy William
Neubauer, Stefanie A.
Gender and Race Differences in the Determinants of Early Adolescent Relationships: Evidence from the NLSY
Presented: Washington, DC, Population Association of America Annual Meetings, March 2001
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS); Fathers, Presence; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Sexual Activity; Sexual Behavior; Siblings

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

In this research, we use unique longitudinal data from the 1979 through 1998 rounds of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79) and its linked child data set to explore the process by which family background and the development of early relationships may or may not translate into early sexual activity. Specifically, we follow a large national sample of youth from ages 11 or 12 to ages 15 or 16. All of the youth we follow are virgins as of ages 13 or 14. We examine the determinants of losing virginity between ages 13-14 and 15-16. Our particular focus in this paper is to explore the extent that there are meaningful generalizations regarding the determinants and the process that can be made across race and gender groups. That is, to what extent do black and white boys and girls follow common developmental pathways with regard to incipient sexual activity, and to what extent are there important factors that are suggestive of variations that may be socially based? In essence, using logit techniques, we try to untangle the independent paths between children's earlier environment, their early adolescent relationship networks, and their propensity to become sexually active by mid-adolescence.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L., Elizabeth C. Cooksey, Darcy William Hango and Stefanie A. Neubauer. "Gender and Race Differences in the Determinants of Early Adolescent Relationships: Evidence from the NLSY." Presented: Washington, DC, Population Association of America Annual Meetings, March 2001.
88. Mott, Frank L.
Fondell, Michelle M.
Hu, Paul N.
Kowaleski-Jones, Lori
Menaghan, Elizabeth G.
The Determinants of First Sex by Age 14 in a High-Risk Adolescent Population
Family Planning Perspectives 28,1 (January-February 1996): 13-18.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2135957
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Alan Guttmacher Institute
Keyword(s): Age at First Intercourse; Alcohol Use; Cigarette Use (see Smoking); Demography; Hispanics; Racial Differences; Sexual Activity; Socioeconomic Factors; Substance Use

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

A study using data for mothers from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth and their children aged 14 or older indicates that, after accounting for a wide range of demographic and socioeconomic antecedents, children are significantly more likely to become sexually active before age 14 if their mother had sex at an early age and if she has worked extensively. In addition, early sexual debut is eight times as likely among black boys as among non-Hispanic white boys. Children who use controlled substances at an early age are more than twice as likely to have sex before age 14 as those who do not, although the type of substance having an effect is different for girls (cigarettes) and boys (alcohol). Church attendance is an important determinant of delayed sexual activity but only when a child's friends attend the same church. (Full text available online from EBSCO.)
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L., Michelle M. Fondell, Paul N. Hu, Lori Kowaleski-Jones and Elizabeth G. Menaghan. "The Determinants of First Sex by Age 14 in a High-Risk Adolescent Population ." Family Planning Perspectives 28,1 (January-February 1996): 13-18.
89. Mott, Frank L.
Fondell, Michelle M.
Hu, Paul N.
Menaghan, Elizabeth G.
Determinants of First Sex by Age 14 in a High Risk Adolescent Population
Working Paper, Center for Human Resource Research and Department of Sociology, The Ohio State University, April 1995
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): Age at First Intercourse; Age at Menarche; Family Characteristics; Gender Differences; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Maternal Employment; Mothers, Behavior; Psychological Effects; Racial Differences; Religious Influences; Sexual Activity; Socioeconomic Factors; Substance Use

This research uses data for children age 13 and over from the 1988, 1990 and 1992 waves of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth child data collection to clarify the importance of a wide range of family and child socio-economic, psychological and physiological priors as predictors of having had sex prior to age fourteen for a high risk national population. The results suggest that while many standard socio-economic and attitudinal priors are not significant predictors, several maternal and child antecedents are highly significant: extensive maternal employment over the child's life is independently associated with above average early sexual activity. Being black is a significant predictor--but only for boys. From an intergenerational perspective, having had a mother who was sexually active at an early age is a robust predictor of a child's early sex. Independent of all other attributes and behaviors. Surprisingly, no cross-generational links between maternal age at menarche and either daughters age at puberty or first sex or within-generational connections between daughter's puberty and age at first sex were found.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L., Michelle M. Fondell, Paul N. Hu and Elizabeth G. Menaghan. "Determinants of First Sex by Age 14 in a High Risk Adolescent Population." Working Paper, Center for Human Resource Research and Department of Sociology, The Ohio State University, April 1995.
90. Mott, Frank L.
Fondell, Michelle M.
Hu, Paul N.
Menaghan, Elizabeth G.
The Determinants of Delayed Sexual Activity in a High Risk Adolescent Population
Working Paper, Center for Human Resource Research and Department of Sociology, The Ohio State University, March 1995
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): Age at First Intercourse; Gender Differences; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Mothers, Behavior; Sexual Activity; Socioeconomic Factors

In this paper we use some unique longitudinal data for a national sample of high risk young adolescents to temporally examine how various dimensions of a child's background may be linked with subsequent early sexual activity. In particular, we consider the extent to which family and maternal attributes, and child personal behaviors and attitudes may be predictive of subsequent sexual activity. We additionally explore the extent to which early sexual intercourse by a youth may be associated with similar early behavior by his or her mother a generation earlier. For daughters, we are able to clarify whether this intergenerational transmission appears to be independent of any propensities by the mother or daughter to have reached menarche at an early age. We essentially incorporate a variety of social and psychological perspectives into our research design.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L., Michelle M. Fondell, Paul N. Hu and Elizabeth G. Menaghan. "The Determinants of Delayed Sexual Activity in a High Risk Adolescent Population." Working Paper, Center for Human Resource Research and Department of Sociology, The Ohio State University, March 1995.
91. Mott, Frank L.
Gryn, Thomas A.
Evaluating Male Fertility Data: Who Reports Consistently and What are the Analytical Implications?
Presented: Washington, DC, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, March 2001
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Age at Birth; Education; Ethnic Groups/Ethnicity; Fertility; Racial Studies

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We follow a national sample of over 4,000 men from the 1979 (when they were 14-22 years old) to 1998 through 18 interview rounds using unique longitudinal data, describing their cumulative as well as cross-sectional fertility profiles (both before and after "cleaning" the data) and partially explaining the reasons for inconsistencies in reports over that interval. We document inconsistencies in reporting over that interval, and, using tabular and multivariate perspectives, clarify some of the characteristics of poorer reporters. In this regard, we provide a number of strong inferences regarding the reasons for differentials in reporting over time - both misreporting or inconsistencies in reporting - in dates of birth as well as actual acknowledgement of the existence of specific children. Factors considered (e.g.) in this examination include race/ethnicity, education, age at birth of child as well as parents' age, parental presence at birth as well as over the child's life.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L. and Thomas A. Gryn. "Evaluating Male Fertility Data: Who Reports Consistently and What are the Analytical Implications?" Presented: Washington, DC, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, March 2001.
92. Mott, Frank L.
Haurin, R. Jean
Being an Only Child: Effects on Educational Progression and Career Orientation
Journal of Family Issues 3,4 (December 1982): 575-593.
Also: http://jfi.sagepub.com/content/3/4/575.abstract
Cohort(s): Young Men, Young Women
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Behavior; Career Patterns; Children; Educational Attainment; Family Influences; I.Q.; Marriage; Pairs (also see Siblings); Siblings

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study uses data from the Young Men's and Young Women's cohorts of the NLS to measure the independent effects of sibling number and placement on a number of educational, family, career, and social-psychological outcomes as of age 24. In particular, the study compares separately for young men and women the effects of being an only child with being the older of two children as well as the general importance of coming from a smaller rather than a larger family. The authors conclude that, while confluence theory is frequently supported by the data for both sexes, the corollary tutoring hypothesis is generally only validated for young women. The authors conjecture that this sex discrepancy may reflect a greater likelihood that the tutoring role within the family may be substantially affectively based, thus making it an activity that is more likely to be associated with female intrafamily role behavior.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L. and R. Jean Haurin. "Being an Only Child: Effects on Educational Progression and Career Orientation." Journal of Family Issues 3,4 (December 1982): 575-593.
93. Mott, Frank L.
Haurin, R. Jean
Factors Affecting Mortality in the Years Surrounding Retirement
In: Retirement Among American Men. H.S. Parnes, ed. Lexington, MA: Lexington Books, 1985
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: Jossey-Bass
Keyword(s): Age and Ageing; Educational Attainment; Employment; Health Care; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Marital Status; Mortality; Occupational Status; Racial Differences; Retirement

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This article presents an analysis of the mortality rates of older men and shows to what extent factors such as race, education and marital status are independent predictors of mortality. Black men have systematically higher mortality than whites, but almost all of this difference reflects differences in socioeconomic background. In contrast, the effect of marital status appears more deeply embedded. After controlling for background factors as well as for differences between the married and non-married in employment and health status, married men still face more favorable survival prospects. Detailed employment measures as well as self-report health measures permit (1) documentation of the health-mortality association and (2) more effective measurement of other mortality differentials. The generally acknowledged overall declines in mortality over the past fifteen years have affected all segments of the society; blacks and whites, the well- and the poorly educated, and the healthy and unhealthy, have all apparently benefited from the general improvements in health and medical care services available in our society. One population subgroup, however, has benefited to a substantially greater extent than others-- individuals not at work who frequently have reported illnesses of long duration. In this regard, it may be fair to conclude that those most in need have indeed benefited the most from the secular improvements in health care.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L. and R. Jean Haurin. "Factors Affecting Mortality in the Years Surrounding Retirement" In: Retirement Among American Men. H.S. Parnes, ed. Lexington, MA: Lexington Books, 1985
94. Mott, Frank L.
Haurin, R. Jean
Inter-Relatedness of Age at First Intercourse, Early Pregnancy, Alcohol, and Drug Use Among American Adolescents
Report, Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1987
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Adolescent Fertility; Age at First Intercourse; Alcohol Use; Behavioral Problems; Childbearing; Deviance; Fertility; Gender Differences; Sexual Activity; Sexual Behavior; Substance Use

This research describes the patterns of initiation into drugs, alcohol, and early sexual activity for a cohort of young men and women reaching maturity in the late 1970s and early 1980s. Preliminary results indicate that while substantial proportions of youth have used marijuana prior to their 16th birthday, much smaller proportions have tried harder substances, with males generally showing higher rates of initiation at all ages than females. Comparisons with alcohol use highlight the sensitivity of initiation patterns to the definition of substance usage employed. Multivariate results suggest a variety of significant independent linkages between family background factors and these early adolescent behaviors. The direction of effects is generally consistent across the alcohol, marijuana, and other drug-use outcomes. Where divergences occur, they tend to emphasize the different influences on early sexual activity as compared to early substance use. Early use of alcohol and m arijuana are also shown to have significant associations with early sexual activity for all race/gender groups independent of family background factors.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L. and R. Jean Haurin. "Inter-Relatedness of Age at First Intercourse, Early Pregnancy, Alcohol, and Drug Use Among American Adolescents." Report, Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1987.
95. Mott, Frank L.
Haurin, R. Jean
Linkages Between Sexual Activity and Alcohol and Drug Use Among American Adolescents
Family Planning Perspectives 20,3 (May-June 1988): 128-136.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2135701
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Alan Guttmacher Institute
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Alcohol Use; Behavioral Problems; Deviance; Drug Use; Fertility; Gender Differences; Sexual Activity; Sexual Behavior

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This research describes the patterns of initiation into drug and alcohol use, and early sexual activity for a cohort of young men and women reaching maturity in the late 1970s and early 1980s. Results indicate that while substantial proportions of youth have used marijuana prior to their 16th birthday, much smaller proportions have tried harder substances or experienced sexual intercourse, with males generally showing higher rates of initiation at all ages than females. Comparisons between various levels of alcohol use highlight the sensitivity of initiation patterns to the definition of substance usage employed. This research emphasizes the general nonparticipation or singularity of participation in these adolescent behaviors, with only modest percentages of youth experiencing multiple events at early ages or in proximity to one another. However, for those youth who do use one or more substances at a given age, the likelihood is greater that they will soon become sexually active. While the converse is also true, it is more so for girls than boys, suggesting stronger linkages among these activities for females.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L. and R. Jean Haurin. "Linkages Between Sexual Activity and Alcohol and Drug Use Among American Adolescents." Family Planning Perspectives 20,3 (May-June 1988): 128-136.
96. Mott, Frank L.
Haurin, R. Jean
Longer Term Determinants of Male Mortality in the Years Surrounding Retirement
Presented: Minneapolis, MN, Population Association of America Meetings, 1984
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Age and Ageing; Health Care; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Mortality; Retirement; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Data from the Older Men's cohort are used to examine the extent to which background as well as more proximate factors are determinants of mortality over the period from 1966 to 1981 for a nationally representative sample of men who were 45 to 59 years of age in 1966. Included is a cohort trend analysis that gives special attention to the group of men who were ages 55 to 59 in 1966 because this group can be followed through the retirement years; by 1981, its surviving members had attained ages 70-74. The study documents how the generally acknowledged overall decline in mortality over the past 15 years has impacted fairly equally on all segments of the society. The only population subgroup that has benefited to a substantially greater extent than others is that group which includes the most obviously at risk individuals not at work who frequently report illnesses of long duration. Thus, it is reasonable to conclude that those most in need have benefited most from the secular improvements in health care.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L. and R. Jean Haurin. "Longer Term Determinants of Male Mortality in the Years Surrounding Retirement." Presented: Minneapolis, MN, Population Association of America Meetings, 1984.
97. Mott, Frank L.
Haurin, R. Jean
The Impact of Health Problems and Mortality on Family Well-Being
In: Work and Retirement: A Longitudinal Study of Men. H.S. Parnes, ed. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1981.
Also: http://www.chipublib.org/search/details/cn/676493
Cohort(s): Mature Women, Older Men
Publisher: MIT Press
Keyword(s): Behavior; Employment; Family Income; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Husbands; Mortality; Racial Differences; Retirement; Widows; Wives

About one-fifth of the more than 20 million males in the U.S. civilian population who were between 45 and 64 years of age in 1976 will not survive to age 65 and the majority of these men will leave widows when they die. These statistics are reflected in the Older Men's sample of the NLS. Of the approximately 5,000 individuals in the original sample, 737 men had died by the time of the 1976 survey before reaching 65. The longitudinal records permit a comparison of the predeath work experience and income of this group with the experience of comparable men who remained alive in 1976. It is possible in this way to explore the extent to which deteriorating health or disability prior to death affect family income and the labor market activity of other family members. To assess the impact of the death of the breadwinner on survivors, an additional analysis can be made of data from the NLS of Mature Women. The longitudinal records of a somewhat younger sample of women who were widowed between the ages of 30 and 53 are compared with those of a similar group of women whose marriages remained intact. The racial difference in mortality rates is pronounced: the gross mortality rate of black men was one-third again as high as that of whites. The differential persists when educational attainment is controlled but tends to disappear within occupational categories. This suggests that black men of this generation have been channeled into less desirable occupations than white men with ostensibly comparable educational backgrounds. Other topics discussed and compared are: racial group death rates, men with previously reported health problems, income and employment experience of decedents, decendents' employment opportunities, labor force behavior of decendents.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L. and R. Jean Haurin. "The Impact of Health Problems and Mortality on Family Well-Being" In: Work and Retirement: A Longitudinal Study of Men. H.S. Parnes, ed. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1981.
98. Mott, Frank L.
Haurin, R. Jean
Variations in the Educational and Career Development Paths of Brothers and Sisters
In: Employment Revolution, Young American Women in the 1970s. F.L. Mott, ed. Cambridge MA: MIT Press, 1982.
Cohort(s): Young Men, Young Women
Publisher: MIT Press
Keyword(s): Career Patterns; Education; Educational Attainment; Family Resources; Pairs (also see Siblings); Parental Influences; Siblings

This study examines the extent to which socioeconomic and internal characteristics of families differentially affect the ability of matched pairs of brothers and sisters to progress through the educational system. The data utilized came from the NLS of Young Men and Women. It was found that young men were apparently advantaged in their educational progress compared with young women. Sibling position or sex of other siblings had little, if any, influence. The extent of parental education did have a major effect, and the educational progress probabilities for sons were higher than those for daughters, regardless of the parents' education. Greater ability for boys and girls was associated with higher probabilities of education completion. Parental encouragement affected the ability of youth to succeed.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L. and R. Jean Haurin. "Variations in the Educational and Career Development Paths of Brothers and Sisters" In: Employment Revolution, Young American Women in the 1970s. F.L. Mott, ed. Cambridge MA: MIT Press, 1982.
99. Mott, Frank L.
Haurin, R. Jean
Marsiglio, William
The Impact of Longitudinal Data Files on Research on Women's Roles
Presented: Detroit, MI, American Sociological Association Annual Meetings, 1983
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Behavior; Research Methodology; Sex Roles

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper considers how several major longitudinal data sets which include data appropriate for sociological analyses of issues associated with women's roles have been used for such research. In particular, the extent to which these data sets are (1) useful for examining the dynamics of female home/work behavior and (2) being used extensively within a longitudinal context. The explicit inclusion of variables for sociological analyses in these data sets and the extent to which the available data have biased the research orientation of sociologists is considered.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L., R. Jean Haurin and William Marsiglio. "The Impact of Longitudinal Data Files on Research on Women's Roles." Presented: Detroit, MI, American Sociological Association Annual Meetings, 1983.
100. Mott, Frank L.
Haurin, R. Jean
Shaw, Lois B.
Statham, Anne
Years for Decision, Volume 5: A Longitudinal Study of the Educational, Labor Market and Family Experiences of Young Women, 1968-1978
Washington DC: National Technical Information Service, 1981
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: National Technical Information Service (NTIS)
Keyword(s): Career Patterns; Educational Attainment; Fertility; Marital Disruption; Sex Roles; Siblings; Work Attitudes; Work History

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This report uses data from the NLS of Young Women to examine trends and determinants of employment between 1968 and 1978 for women who were 14 to 24 years of age in 1968. The study highlights the importance of non-economic factors as motivators of employment for young women and the relative independence of work and fertility for young women now reaching adulthood. The study also contrasts the educational progression paths of young men and women, documents the association between divorce, remarriage and economic wellbeing for young women, and describes recent trends in their marital, childbearing, schooling and employment patterns and the association between those phenomena. This volume has been published by MIT Press entitled The Employment Revolution: Young American Women of the 1970s, Frank L. Mott, ed.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L., R. Jean Haurin, Lois B. Shaw and Anne Statham. Years for Decision, Volume 5: A Longitudinal Study of the Educational, Labor Market and Family Experiences of Young Women, 1968-1978. Washington DC: National Technical Information Service, 1981.
101. Mott, Frank L.
Kowaleski-Jones, Lori
Menaghan, Elizabeth G.
Gender Variations in the Associations Between Father's Absence from the Home and Children's Behavior: Sensitivity to Life Cycle Stage
Presented: Miami, FL, Population Association of America Meetings, May 1994
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Birthweight; Children, Behavioral Development; Fathers, Absence; Gender Differences; Household Composition; Life Cycle Research; Maternal Employment; Mothers, Education; Poverty; Self-Esteem

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This research uses the 1979 through 1990 rounds of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth and its complementary child assessment data to explore the shorter and longer term implications of a father's absence for the behavior of national sample of white children who are nine to eleven years of age in 1990. A particular focus of the research is to explore gender variations in the effects of father's absence on the behavior of this sample of about 500 children. The results suggest that (1) there is systematic evidence of strong associations between a fathers absence and a child's behavior in the shorter and longer run, with particular strong effects in the years immediately following the fathers departure. (2) More modest effects are found for girls than for boys. In this regard, there is no evidence of behavioral deterioration among girls compared to boys in the later childhood period -- either for children whose father has been absent for a lengthy time period or for children whose father left in the later childhood period.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L., Lori Kowaleski-Jones and Elizabeth G. Menaghan. "Gender Variations in the Associations Between Father's Absence from the Home and Children's Behavior: Sensitivity to Life Cycle Stage." Presented: Miami, FL, Population Association of America Meetings, May 1994.
102. Mott, Frank L.
Kowaleski-Jones, Lori
Menaghan, Elizabeth G.
Paternal Absence and Child Behavior: Does a Child's Gender Make a Difference?
Journal of Marriage and Family 59,1 (February 1997): 103-118.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/353665
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: National Council on Family Relations
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Birthweight; Child Development; Children, Behavioral Development; Fathers, Absence; Gender Differences; Household Composition; Maternal Employment; Parental Influences; Poverty; Pre-natal Care/Exposure; Pre/post Natal Behavior; Pre/post Natal Health Care; Self-Esteem

A study was conducted to examine the shorter and longer implications of a father's absence from the home for the behavior of a national sample of 482 white children aged 9-11 years in 1990, focusing in particular on gender differences in these longer and shorter term effects. Findings indicate that more modest effects of a father's absence are found for girls than are for boys, although the gender variations typically are not statistically significant. In addition, contrary to expectations, this modest behavioral gender difference appears for both externalization and internalization subscores. Furthermore, boys and girls seem to react similarly and negatively to the presence of a new man in the home.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L., Lori Kowaleski-Jones and Elizabeth G. Menaghan. "Paternal Absence and Child Behavior: Does a Child's Gender Make a Difference?" Journal of Marriage and Family 59,1 (February 1997): 103-118.
103. Mott, Frank L.
Kowaleski-Jones, Lori
Menaghan, Elizabeth G.
Paternal Absence and Child Behavior: Does Child Gender Make a Difference?
Working Paper, Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, Columbus, 1996
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Birthweight; Children, Behavioral Development; Fathers, Absence; Gender Differences; Household Composition; Maternal Employment; Poverty; Pre-natal Care/Exposure; Pre/post Natal Behavior; Pre/post Natal Health Care; Self-Esteem

This research uses data from the 1979 through 1990 rounds of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth and its complementary child assessment data to explore the shorter and longer implications of a father's absence from the home.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L., Lori Kowaleski-Jones and Elizabeth G. Menaghan. "Paternal Absence and Child Behavior: Does Child Gender Make a Difference?" Working Paper, Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, Columbus, 1996.
104. Mott, Frank L.
Marsiglio, William
Early Childbearing and Completion of High School
Family Planning Perspectives 17,5 (September-October 1985): 234-237.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2135098
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Alan Guttmacher Institute
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Childbearing, Adolescent; Educational Attainment; Fertility; First Birth; High School Completion/Graduates; High School Dropouts

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Data are presented documenting the extent of high school completion among current 20-26 year old women. Women who have a child before completion are far less likely to eventually obtain a secondary credential than women who postpone childbearing until their 20s. Among women who complete high school but bear a child prior to the date of high school accreditation, almost 40 percent obtain their credential through the GED program.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L. and William Marsiglio. "Early Childbearing and Completion of High School." Family Planning Perspectives 17,5 (September-October 1985): 234-237.
105. Mott, Frank L.
Maxwell, Nan L.
Early Fertility Behavior of Non-College Bound Youth: Trends and Consequences
Working Paper, Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, Columbus, 1981
Cohort(s): NLSY79, Young Women
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Behavior; Fertility; First Birth; Household Composition

Using data from the 1976 NLS Young Women's cohort and the 1979 NLSY, this study compares the early childbearing behavior of young women in the late 1960s and 1970s. It contrasts separately for black and white non-college bound women the percentages who had a first birth while still in high school, their family situations, socioeconomic characteristics, access to income support, employment situations and their future employment intentions.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L. and Nan L. Maxwell. "Early Fertility Behavior of Non-College Bound Youth: Trends and Consequences." Working Paper, Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, Columbus, 1981.
106. Mott, Frank L.
Maxwell, Nan L.
School-Age Mothers: 1968-1979
Family Planning Perspectives 13,6 (November-December 1981): 287-292.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2134593
Cohort(s): NLSY79, Young Women
Publisher: Alan Guttmacher Institute
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Adolescent Fertility; Childbearing, Adolescent; Children; Dropouts; Fertility; High School Completion/Graduates; Household Composition; Mothers; Mothers, Behavior; Teenagers; Unemployment; Welfare

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using data from the 1968 NLS of Young Women and the 1979 NLSY, this study compares the early childbearing behavior of young women in the late 1960s and 1970s. It contrasts separately for black and white non-college bound women the percentages who had a first birth while still in high school, their family situations, socioeconomic characteristics, access to income support, employment situations and their future employment intentions.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L. and Nan L. Maxwell. "School-Age Mothers: 1968-1979." Family Planning Perspectives 13,6 (November-December 1981): 287-292.
107. Mott, Frank L.
Menaghan, Elizabeth G.
Adolescents At Risk: Family Predictors Of Problem Behaviors
Final Report for Grant Apr 000961, Office of Population Affairs, Department of Health & Human Services, September 1996
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Behavior, Antisocial; Child Development; Family History; Family Influences; Family Studies; Fathers, Absence; Fathers, Presence; Gender Differences; Life Course; Maternal Employment; Mothers, Education; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Poverty; Sexual Activity; Siblings

This report synthesizes our work on grant APR 000961, entitled "Adolescents at Risk--Family Predictors of Problem Behaviors". This grant used a life course perspective to explore the family origins of child and adolescent problem behaviors. The availability of a longitudinal data file, the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, enabled us to follow national samples of youth who are disproportionately from high risk backgrounds, from mid-childhood well into adolescence, examining the family antecedents and concomitants of troublesome behaviors. This report summarizes our findings from the full body of research which has been completed under this grant. In this final report, our approach is to systematically clarify how a variety of early family behaviors and attributes may or may not contribute to a developmental process whereby some youths succeed emotionally and intellectually, whereas others follow a more erratic developmental path. All of the findings we report in this summary represent independent effects, after a wide range of family and maternal priors have been taken into account. Major findings are summarized in 8 components.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L. and Elizabeth G. Menaghan. "Adolescents At Risk: Family Predictors Of Problem Behaviors." Final Report for Grant Apr 000961, Office of Population Affairs, Department of Health & Human Services, September 1996.
108. Mott, Frank L.
Menaghan, Elizabeth G.
Linkages Between Early Childhood Family Structure, Socio-Economic Well-Being and Middle-Childhood Socio-Emotional Development
Presented: Cincinnati, OH, Population Association of America Meetings, April 1993
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Behavioral Problems; Children, Behavioral Development; Children, Home Environment; Children, Well-Being; Depression (see also CESD); Family Structure; Fathers, Absence; Household Composition; Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness; Peers/Peer influence/Peer relations; Poverty; Socioeconomic Status (SES); Well-Being

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This research uses family and child outcome data from the 1979 through 1990 rounds of the National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth to explore associations between infant and early childhood family structure, socio-economic well-being and parent-child interaction patterns and evidence of subsequent behavior problems by the same children in the immediate pre-adolescent years. The children we follow in this research all have been born between the 1979 and 1982 survey rounds and thus will be between the ages of 8 and 11 as of the 1990 survey point. This sample of approximately 1300 children includes an over-representation of black youth. The separate black and white samples are sufficiently large to permit sample stratification as necessary. The outcome variables we focus on are a well-established nationally-normed behavior problems scale and six behavior problems subscales which measure anxiousness-depression, peer conflict, hyperactivity, headstrong behavior, dependency, and anti-social behavior.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L. and Elizabeth G. Menaghan. "Linkages Between Early Childhood Family Structure, Socio-Economic Well-Being and Middle-Childhood Socio-Emotional Development." Presented: Cincinnati, OH, Population Association of America Meetings, April 1993.
109. Mott, Frank L.
Moore, Sylvia F.
Determinants and Consequences of Occupational Information for Young Women
Working Paper, Columbus, OH, Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1976
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): Earnings; Employment; Schooling; Vocational Guidance; Work Attitudes; Work Experience; Work Knowledge; World of Work Test

In this study, an examination of the determinants and consequences of occupational knowledge is carried out, using data collected from the NLS of 5,159 Young Women. The significance of various background factors as potential determinants of a young woman's occupational knowledge score and the effect of this score on subsequent earnings and occupational status are investigated. The report notes that the extent of vocational counseling was irrelevant as a determinant of the knowledge of the world of work score. It was found that the relevance of occupational information, as measured by this score, to predict early adults' labor market success was not as clear for young women as it has been shown to be for men.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L. and Sylvia F. Moore. "Determinants and Consequences of Occupational Information for Young Women." Working Paper, Columbus, OH, Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1976.
110. Mott, Frank L.
Moore, Sylvia F.
Socioeconomic Determinants and Shortrun Consequences of Marital Disruption
Presented: St Louis, MO, Population Association of America Meetings, April 1977
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Divorce; Employment; Husbands, Income; Marital Dissolution; Marriage; Socioeconomic Status (SES); Welfare

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The primary objective of this paper is to highlight the extent to which economic factors play major roles in creating or precipitating the marital disruption process. Other variables reflecting attitudinal, legal, and duration and timing elements function chiefly as controls on the model. This paper was published in Mott, Women, Work, and Family: Dimensions of Change in American Society.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L. and Sylvia F. Moore. "Socioeconomic Determinants and Shortrun Consequences of Marital Disruption." Presented: St Louis, MO, Population Association of America Meetings, April 1977.
111. Mott, Frank L.
Moore, Sylvia F.
The Causes of Marital Disruption Among Young American Women: An Interdisciplinary Perspective
Journal of Marriage and Family 41,2 (May 1979): 355-365.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/351702
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: National Council on Family Relations
Keyword(s): Behavior; Children; Divorce; Family Influences; Husbands, Influence; Marital Disruption; Marriage; Welfare; Work Experience

Using the National Longitudinal Survey of young women aged 14 to 24 in 1968 who were interviewed annually over a five-year period, a study was conducted to examine the relative importance of economic and noneconomic factors in determining the likelihood of marital disruption for young black and white women. A literature review showed that previous research lacked an interdisciplinary approach. The major economic factors examined consisted of the husband's earnings, improvements in financial position, debt accumulation, welfare accessibility, the woman's income, and number of hours worked per week. The demographic and social variables considered were the woman's education, age, duration of marriage, childbearing, growing up in a broken home, and urban/rural residence. Also the ease with which one can obtain a divorce in the state of residence was analyzed. It was found that (1) direct economic factors are less important as determinants of marital breakdown than socioeconomic background and demographic factors; (2) educational attainment, coming from a broken home, age, and duration of marriage are the most influential determinants; (3) racial differences are not significant. Topics for future research on this subject are suggested. (ELG)
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L. and Sylvia F. Moore. "The Causes of Marital Disruption Among Young American Women: An Interdisciplinary Perspective." Journal of Marriage and Family 41,2 (May 1979): 355-365.
112. Mott, Frank L.
Moore, Sylvia F.
The Tempo of Remarriage Among Young American Women
Journal of Marriage and Family 45,2 (May 1983): 427-436.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/351521
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: National Council on Family Relations
Keyword(s): Children; Educational Attainment; Family Influences; Marital Dissolution; Remarriage; Socioeconomic Status (SES); Work History

This study uses data from the NLS of Young Women to examine the socioeconomic determinants of the timing of remarriage during the first five years following divorce for young white women who divorced for the first time between l968 and l973. The study concludes that, while socioeconomic and demographic variables are only moderately useful predictors of remarriage, not taking into account the effects that background factors have on the pace of remarriage can lead to significant misstatements of the importance of various factors for interpreting the likelihood of remarriage.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L. and Sylvia F. Moore. "The Tempo of Remarriage Among Young American Women." Journal of Marriage and Family 45,2 (May 1983): 427-436.
113. Mott, Frank L.
Mott, Susan H.
Attitude Consistency Among American Youth
Report, Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1982
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): Fertility; Sex Roles

This study uses data from the NLSY, a representative sample of about 12,000 American youth who were 14 to 21 years of age in l979, to examine the extent of congruence between the attitudes of young men and women about the appropriate roles for women and their own fertility expectations. The study hypothesizes that women, whites, older youth, and youth expecting to complete higher education should show greater independent associations between their women's role attitudes and their fertility expectations. The results support these hypotheses and the verified hypotheses are consistent with the notions that: (1) youth for whom attitudes toward women's roles and fertility expectations have more direct relevance, particularly in the short run, exhibit greater congruence between their values and expectations; and (2) youth who are less assimilated into the socioeconomic mainstream exhibit less congruence between their values and expectations, primarily because the variability in women's role attitudes exceeds the variability in fertility expectations and because youth who are less assimilated express more traditional values.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L. and Susan H. Mott. "Attitude Consistency Among American Youth." Report, Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1982.
114. Mott, Frank L.
Mott, Susan H.
Level and Stability of Young Adult Fertility Preferences
Report, Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1985
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): Fertility

This paper utilizes the 1979 and 1983 rounds of the NLSY to examine the level and stability of the fertility preferences of a nationally representative sample of young males and females aged 14 to 22 in 1979. The results demonstrate the importance of micro-level longitudinal data for measuring and interpreting trends in the fertility expectations of young adults. Findings indicate that, while in the aggregate mean fertility expectations decline with maturation for all subsets of young adults, at the individual level, maturation is associated with an upward movement in fertility expectations. In addition, this tendency is most pronounced for better educated white women, a substantial portion of the total pool.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L. and Susan H. Mott. "Level and Stability of Young Adult Fertility Preferences." Report, Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1985.
115. Mott, Frank L.
Mott, Susan H.
Prospective Life Style Congruence Among American Adolescents: Variations in the Association Between Fertility Expectations and Ideas Regarding Women's Roles
Social Forces 63,1 (September 1984): 184-208.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2578865
Cohort(s): Young Men, Young Women
Publisher: University of North Carolina Press
Keyword(s): Fertility; Sex Roles; Socioeconomic Status (SES); Teenagers

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study examines the extent of congruence between the attitudes of young men and women concerning the appropriate roles for women and their own fertility expectations. It is hypothesized that women, whites, older youth, and youth expecting to complete higher education should show greater independent associations between their attitudes of women's roles and their fertility expectations. In addition, the hypotheses are consistent with the following notions: (1) youth for whom attitudes toward women's roles and fertility expectations have more direct relevance, particularly in the short run, display greater congruence between their values and expectations; and (2) youth who are less assimilated into the socioeconomic mainstream exhibit less congruence between their values and expectations.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L. and Susan H. Mott. "Prospective Life Style Congruence Among American Adolescents: Variations in the Association Between Fertility Expectations and Ideas Regarding Women's Roles." Social Forces 63,1 (September 1984): 184-208.
116. Mott, Frank L.
Quinlan, Stephen V.
Children of the NLSY: 1988 Tabulations and Summary Discussion
Report, Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, March 1991
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLS General, NLSY79
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): Child Development; Children; Data Quality/Consistency; General Assessment; NLS Description; Overview, Child Assessment Data

This report, designed for persons interested in learning more about the Children of the NLSY data set as well as those researchers actively working with these data, provides detailed information on the 1988 data collection including: (1) basic demographic characteristics of the sample of children and NLSY mothers; (2) a discussion of the thirteen assessments administered during the 1986 and 1988 surveys to the mother and child samples; (3) distributions of the normed and raw child assessment scores including completion rates for each assessment; and (4) within- and cross-year correlations for selected assessments as of 1988.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L. and Stephen V. Quinlan. "Children of the NLSY: 1988 Tabulations and Summary Discussion." Report, Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, March 1991.
117. Mott, Frank L.
Quinlan, Stephen V.
Maternal-Child Health Data from the NLSY: 1988 Tabulations and Summary Discussion
Report, Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, October 1991.
Also: http://www.nlsinfo.org/usersvc/Child-Young-Adult/Maternal-Child_Health_Data_From_the_NLSY.pdf
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): Birthweight; Child Health; Children; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Mothers; Mothers, Education; Pre-natal Care/Exposure; Pre/post Natal Behavior; Pre/post Natal Health Care; Pregnancy and Pregnancy Outcomes

This report includes detailed information as of the 1988 survey round on the pre- and post-natal health care status of women with respect to the periods preceding and following the births of all their children. This includes (but is not limited to) information about prenatal care utilization, substance use during pregnancy, amnio/sonogram use, weight gain, the infant's birth weight, gestation length, sick and well care during the first year of life and infant feeding practices. The report includes selected analytically useful crosstabulations as well as charts and figures. Tabulations are presented by race/ethnicity, maternal education and poverty status. In addition, data are provided on the health status of all the children as of the 1988 survey date. The report includes a brief narrative discussion as well as an appendix precisely defining all of the health inputs including data limitations.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L. and Stephen V. Quinlan. "Maternal-Child Health Data from the NLSY: 1988 Tabulations and Summary Discussion." Report, Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, October 1991.
118. Mott, Frank L.
Quinlan, Stephen V.
Participation in Project Head Start: Determinants and Possible Intermediate-Term Consequences
Working Paper, Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1992.
Also: http://www.nlsinfo.org/usersvc/Child-Young-Adult/MottQuinlan1991-HeadStart.pdf
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Child Development; Children; Children, Academic Development; Children, Behavioral Development; General Assessment; Head Start; Maternal Employment; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT); Pre-natal Care/Exposure; Pre/post Natal Behavior; Pre/post Natal Health Care; Racial Differences; Temperament

This research uses data from the 1988 Merged Child-Mother File of the NLSY to present: (1) summary statistics on Head Start enrollment; (2) multivariate analyses examining the independent predictors of Head Start enrollment; and (3) multivariate analyses examining the extent to which enrollment in a Head Start program may have impacted on a child's behavior and verbal and reading skills over a two year (1986-1988) period, controlling for a full range of background factors including behavior problems and verbal ability at the initiation of participation in the program. The sample of children examined have been born to a nationally representative sample of women age 23 to 30 in 1988.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L. and Stephen V. Quinlan. "Participation in Project Head Start: Determinants and Possible Intermediate-Term Consequences." Working Paper, Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1992.
119. Mott, Frank L.
Quinlan, Stephen V.
Participation in Project Head Start: Determinants and Possible Short-Term Consequences
Report, Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, July 1992
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Child Development; Head Start; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT)

This report presents multivariate analyses examining the extent to which enrollment in a Head Start program over a two-year period may have impacted children's behavior and verbal and reading skills.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L. and Stephen V. Quinlan. "Participation in Project Head Start: Determinants and Possible Short-Term Consequences." Report, Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, July 1992.
120. Mott, Frank L.
Quinlan, Stephen V.
Ten-and-Over Years: Self-Reports from the Children of the NLSY
Report, Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1993.
Also: http://www.nlsinfo.org/usersvc/Child-Young-Adult/Ten-And-Over%20Report-Nov93.pdf
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS); Self-Reporting

Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L. and Stephen V. Quinlan. "Ten-and-Over Years: Self-Reports from the Children of the NLSY." Report, Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1993.
121. Mott, Frank L.
Sandell, Steven H.
Shapiro, David
Brito, Patricia K.
Years for Decision, Volume 4: A Longitudinal Study of the Educational, Labor Market and Family Experiences of Young Women, 1968 to 1973
R and D Monograph 24, Volume 4. Washington, DC: US GPO, 1978.
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Children; College Education; Educational Attainment; Job Training; Marital Disruption; Migration; Occupational Aspirations; Socioeconomic Status (SES); Unemployment

Also published as: Published as: Women, Work, and Family. Lexington, MA: Lexington Books, 1978. This monograph describes the changes both in the attitudes of women toward working outside the home and in their actual participation in the work force. It is based on a five-year longitudinal study of more than 5, 000 women aged 14 to 24 when first interviewed. Based on a comprehensive set of data obtained through personal interviews with a national sample of young women over the period 1968 to 1973, these studies focus either on aspects of the labor market experience of the current generation of young women or on facets of their lives that have substantial relationships to their labor market activity. Included are: preparation for the world of work-college attendance; labor force dynamics associated with withdrawal from and reentry into the labor force due to childbirth; the characteristics of young women that are associated with the choice of an "atypical," or "male" occupation; whether investment in on-the-job training is related to an expectation of long-term attachment to the labor force; some of the causes as well as the consequences of migration for the economic welfare of young women and their families; some of the determinants of marital disruption, and also the short- run economic consequences for women and children.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L., Steven H. Sandell, David Shapiro and Patricia K. Brito. Years for Decision, Volume 4: A Longitudinal Study of the Educational, Labor Market and Family Experiences of Young Women, 1968 to 1973. R and D Monograph 24, Volume 4. Washington, DC: US GPO, 1978..
122. Mott, Frank L.
Shapiro, David
Complementarity of Work and Fertility Among Young American Mothers
Population Studies 37,2 (July 1983): 239-252
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: Population Investigation Committee
Keyword(s): Childbearing, Adolescent; Children; Employment; Fertility; Life Cycle Research; Mothers

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This research uses data from the Young Women's cohort of the NLS to examine the extent to which women maintain a continuity of work attachment during their early childbearing years, the years when they traditionally were most likely to withdraw from the work force. The results indicate that women who maintain closer ties to the work force immediately before and after their first birth are also more likely to be employed in l978--between five and ten years after the first birth-- independent of intervening fertility events and other labor supply factors considered to be important predictors of work. The research supports the notion that work and fertility are increasingly becoming complementary activities for American women.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L. and David Shapiro. "Complementarity of Work and Fertility Among Young American Mothers." Population Studies 37,2 (July 1983): 239-252.
123. Mott, Frank L.
Shapiro, David
Some Dimensions of Work-Fertility Analysis from the National Longitudinal Surveys of Labor Market Experience
Presented: Chapel Hill, North Carolina, Eastern North American Region Joint Meetings of the Institute of Mathematical Statistics and The American Statistical Association, April 1977
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: American Statistical Association
Keyword(s): Employment; Fertility

This paper represents, in essence, a program report on our work-fertility research which represents a major and continuing thrust of our research program at the center for Human Resource Research.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L. and David Shapiro. "Some Dimensions of Work-Fertility Analysis from the National Longitudinal Surveys of Labor Market Experience." Presented: Chapel Hill, North Carolina, Eastern North American Region Joint Meetings of the Institute of Mathematical Statistics and The American Statistical Association, April 1977.
124. Mott, Frank L.
Shapiro, David
Trends in the Employment of Young Women: Evidence from the National Longitudinal Surveys
Report, Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1982
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): Children; Demography; Educational Attainment; Employment; Family Income; Labor Force Participation; Women; Work History

This paper uses data from the 1968-1978 Young Women's cohort. Recent increases in the work participation of young adult women reflect the greater likelihood of women with children to be employed, particularly women who are better educated. While young mothers are not so likely to be working as women without children, the employment gap between the two groups is rapidly narrowing.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L. and David Shapiro. "Trends in the Employment of Young Women: Evidence from the National Longitudinal Surveys." Report, Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1982.
125. Mott, Frank L.
Shaw, Lois B.
The Transition from School to Adulthood
Presented: Washington, DC, Conference on Young Women and Employment, U.S. Department of Labor, 1978.
Also: http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/detailmini.jsp?_nfpb=true&_&ERICExtSearch_SearchValue_0=ED158018&ERICExtSearch_SearchType_0=no&accno=ED158018
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Children; Dropouts; Fertility; High School Completion/Graduates; Job Search; Teenagers; Transition, School to Work; Welfare; Work Knowledge

This paper focuses on young women who either drop out of high school without completing the 12th grade or who complete high school but do not immediately attend college. Not only do child-related considerations cause dropping out, but they then subsequently affect the ability of a woman both to take formal training programs and to find meaningful employment at a reasonable salary. The presence of a child not only inhibits the job hunt and the probability of finding a job but, in addition, has associated child-care costs. Thus, the "threshold" at which it is economically rational to accept a job is probably higher. Youth who will drop out of high school are far less likely to have had extensive employment experiences before leaving school. They are more likely to become discouraged and withdraw from the labor force.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L. and Lois B. Shaw. "The Transition from School to Adulthood." Presented: Washington, DC, Conference on Young Women and Employment, U.S. Department of Labor, 1978.
126. Mott, Frank L.
Shaw, Lois B.
Work and Family in the School Leaving Years: A Comparison of Female High School Graduates and Dropouts
Report, Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1978
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): Childbearing; Dropouts; Earnings; Educational Attainment; High School; High School Dropouts; Marriage; Work Knowledge

In this study, the determinants and consequences of dropping out of high school are addressed. Findings show that child-related considerations affect dropping out as well as the ability of a woman to take formal training programs and to find meaningful employment at a reasonable salary. Independent of child considerations, short and long-term implications are also discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L. and Lois B. Shaw. "Work and Family in the School Leaving Years: A Comparison of Female High School Graduates and Dropouts." Report, Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1978.
127. Parnes, Herbert S.
Chirikos, Thomas N.
Menaghan, Elizabeth G.
Mott, Frank L.
The NLS Older Male Sample Revisited: A Unique Data Base for Gerontological Research. A Description of the Data Base and Illustrative Tables
Report, Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1992
Cohort(s): NLS General, Older Men
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): Labor Force Participation; Longitudinal Data Sets; Longitudinal Surveys; Mortality; NLS Description; Support Networks; Well-Being; Widows

This volume, consisting of 56 tables and descriptive text, introduces the reader to the 1990 re-survey of the NLS Older Men's Cohort, in which interviews were obtained with 2,092 members of the original sample and with 2,206 widows or other next-of-kin of decedents. It is designed to: (1) describe and illustrate the categories of data that were collected; (2) record the sizes of various subsets of the sample (e.g., the number of men who were employed in the year preceding the survey); (3) present some simple relationships that invite more sophisticated analysis; and (4) provide some evidence on the reliability and validity of several of the psychological scales used in the survey. Although the tabulations presented within this volume are based on preliminary data, researchers should find the results useful in deciding whether the data base will meet their needs and, if so, in developing research plans before obtaining the data files. Included is an introduction, which describes the purpose and content of the 1990 survey, and seven additional sections dealing with "Mortality", "Physical Well-Being", "Emotional Well-Being", "Family and Friendship Support Systems", "Economic Well-Being", "Current and Prospective Labor Market Activity", and "Status of the Widows."
Bibliography Citation
Parnes, Herbert S., Thomas N. Chirikos, Elizabeth G. Menaghan and Frank L. Mott. "The NLS Older Male Sample Revisited: A Unique Data Base for Gerontological Research. A Description of the Data Base and Illustrative Tables." Report, Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1992.
128. Parnes, Herbert S.
Crowley, Joan E.
Haurin, R. Jean
Less, Lawrence L.
Mott, Frank L.
Morgan, William R.
Nestel, Gilbert
Retirement Among American Men
Lexington, MA: Lexington Books, 1985
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: Jossey-Bass
Keyword(s): Early Retirement; Earnings; Education; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Job Satisfaction; Life Satisfaction; Mortality; Retirees; Retirement

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Fifteen years of data from a nationally representative sample of men age 45-59 in 1966 show that by 1981 most had retired. One third of all retirements and almost half of those by black men were caused by poor health; fewer than five percent of retirees were forced from their jobs by mandatory plans; about 10 percent of retirees were forced from their jobs by mandatory plans; about 10 percent left the labor market in discouragement due to labor market adversity. Most retirements, however, are voluntary, and most take place before age 65. Trends in mortality differentials show that general improvements in health and medical care have benefited all groups, especially the chronically ill. The data highlight a trend toward early retirement in the 1960s and 1970s and show that only 30 percent of retirements actually took place at the age men expected when asked at age 59. Economic well being, leisure activities and social interactions, psychological and physical well being are examined. The experience of the minority who continue to work beyond the normal retirement age is also analyzed.

Introduction and overview / Herbert S. Parnes and Lawrence J. Less -- Factors affecting mortality in the years surrounding retirement / Frank L. Mott and R. Jean Haurin -- The volume and pattern of retirements, 1966-1981 / Herbert S. Parnes and Lawrence J. Less -- Retirement expectation and the timing of retirement / Gilbert Nestel -- Economic well-being in retirement / Herbert S. Parnes and Lawrence J. Less -- Leisure activities and social networks / William R. Morgan, Herbert S. Parnes, and Lawrence J. Less -- Longitudinal effects of retirement on men's psychological and physical well-being / Joan E. Crowley -- Shunning retirement : the experience of full-time workers / Herbert S. Parnes and Lawrence J. Less.

Bibliography Citation
Parnes, Herbert S., Joan E. Crowley, R. Jean Haurin, Lawrence L. Less, Frank L. Mott, William R. Morgan and Gilbert Nestel. Retirement Among American Men. Lexington, MA: Lexington Books, 1985.
129. Parnes, Herbert S.
Nestel, Gilbert
Chirikos, Thomas N.
Daymont, Thomas N.
Mott, Frank L.
Parsons, Donald O.
From the Middle to the Later Years: Longitudinal Studies of the Preretirement and Postretirement Experiences of Men
Report, Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1979
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): Employment; Family Background and Culture; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Household Income; Mortality; Retirement

The pre-retirement labor market behavior and the post-retirement experience of men between ages 45 and 69 are examined. This analysis shows the extension of the surveys beyond the originally planned five years. Both labor market behaviors and post-retirement experience are based on longitudinal data collected by periodic personal interviews with the same sample of men between l966 and l976. This is volume 5 in a series. This volume was also published by MIT Press as Work and Retirement.
Bibliography Citation
Parnes, Herbert S., Gilbert Nestel, Thomas N. Chirikos, Thomas N. Daymont, Frank L. Mott and Donald O. Parsons. From the Middle to the Later Years: Longitudinal Studies of the Preretirement and Postretirement Experiences of Men. Report, Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1979.
130. Patel, Diane B.
Lynch, Jamie L.
Mott, Frank L.
Good Parenting: Do Younger Parents Learn from Their Mothers?
Presented: New York, NY, Population Association of America Annual Meetings, March 29-31, 2007.
Also: http://paa2007.princeton.edu/abstractViewer.aspx?submissionId=71422
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Child Health; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Mothers, Behavior; Transfers, Parental

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

In ongoing research, we are utilizing a unique data set, the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (1979 cohort) and their Young Adult children, to explore cross generational connections in the propensity of young men and women at adolescent and young adult ages to follow parenting practices evidenced by their mothers a generation earlier. Our particular focus will be to contrast their mother's child-raising behaviors (NLSY79) for their children in the 1980s with how these young women and men (NLSY Young Adults) are currently raising the children in their households, as evidenced using the HOME scale (Caldwell and Bradley 1984). In addition to describing these cross generational connections, we will focus on the extent to which these connections may retain their independence in a multivariate context after controlling for a wide range of factors available in the data set that might be considered to be independently linked with parenting behaviors.
Bibliography Citation
Patel, Diane B., Jamie L. Lynch and Frank L. Mott. "Good Parenting: Do Younger Parents Learn from Their Mothers?" Presented: New York, NY, Population Association of America Annual Meetings, March 29-31, 2007.
131. Shapiro, David
Mott, Frank L.
Effects of Selected Variables on Work Hours of Young Women
Monthly Labor Review 106,7 (July 1983): 31-34.
Also: http://www.bls.gov/opub/mlr/1983/07/rpt1full.pdf
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Educational Attainment; Fertility; Labor Supply; Work Hours

This research summary reports on estimates of the determinants of hours of work among women in their twenties for the two periods, 1968-73 and 1973-78. Educational attainment and fertility status are key determinants of hours worked among both blacks and whites, and husband's earnings are significantly associated with the hours of work of white wives. Over the course of the decade, there is a pattern among both whites and blacks of reduced impact on labor supply of being married and of husband's earnings, lesser effect of educational attainment among non-mothers and larger effects of schooling among mothers. There is a clear trend toward greater work activity among mothers, and it is the better- educated (high-wage) mothers who are leading the way.
Bibliography Citation
Shapiro, David and Frank L. Mott. "Effects of Selected Variables on Work Hours of Young Women." Monthly Labor Review 106,7 (July 1983): 31-34.
132. Shapiro, David
Mott, Frank L.
Labor Force Attachment during the Early Childbearing Years: Evidence from the National Longitudinal Surveys of Young Women
Annales de l'INSEE 30-31 (April-September 1978): 565-598.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20075304
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: INSEE (Institut National de la Statistique et des Etudes Economiques)
Keyword(s): Career Patterns; Childbearing, Adolescent; Children; Fertility

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper presents unique data on labor force attachment of young American women during the periods immediately surrounding the first and second births. In the context of neoclassical labor-supply theory and utilizing both cross-sectional and longitudinal data sets, factors contributing to variations in labor force attachment among these women are examined. The researchers find that the empirical results from the cross-sectional and longitudinal data sets are generally consistent with each other and for the most part supportive of neoclassical labor supply theory.
Bibliography Citation
Shapiro, David and Frank L. Mott. "Labor Force Attachment during the Early Childbearing Years: Evidence from the National Longitudinal Surveys of Young Women." Annales de l'INSEE 30-31 (April-September 1978): 565-598.
133. Shapiro, David
Mott, Frank L.
Labor Supply Behavior of Prospective and New Mothers
Demography 16,2 (May 1979): 199-208.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/97g24103133w4u2q/
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Career Patterns; Earnings; Educational Attainment; Family Income; First Birth; Life Cycle Research; Mothers; Vocational Education

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Utilizing unique data generated from the NLS of Young Women, this paper examines the labor force participation of young mothers in the months immediately preceding and following the birth of the first child. Labor supply behavior at this point in the life cycle is described in greater detail than has hitherto been available. In addition, the independent effect of several factors of interest on the probability that a young woman will be in the labor force during various intervals surrounding the first birth is analyzed.
Bibliography Citation
Shapiro, David and Frank L. Mott. "Labor Supply Behavior of Prospective and New Mothers." Demography 16,2 (May 1979): 199-208.
134. Shapiro, David
Mott, Frank L.
Long-Term Employment and Earnings of Women in Relation to Employment Behavior Surrounding the First Birth
Presented: Minneapolis, MN, Donner Foundation - University of Minnesota Industrial Relations Center Workshop on the Economic Well-Being of Women and Children, 1991
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: Author
Keyword(s): Children, Well-Being; First Birth; Labor Force Participation; Maternal Employment; Mothers; Racial Differences; Wages; Well-Being; Work Histories

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper examines the extent to which the employment activities of women overtime are linked to their work behavior during the period immediately before and after the birth of their first child. Utilizing data from the NLS of Young Women 1968-1987, the authors find that, for the women studied, employment behavior at first birth tends to be a significant independent predictor of lifetime work experience. Differences in current and recent work behavior according to first-birth employment status were found to persist but diminish over time. However, such differences were still evident 14-19 years after the first birth particularly for women who returned to work shortly after the child's birth. These differences in employment behavior translate into improved economic well-being, although somewhat differently for whites and blacks. Other things being equal, the greater lifetime work experience of whites who worked both just before and just after the first birth is associated with an average wage premium of nearly 18 percent compared to those who were not employed during this period of time. The corresponding wage premium for the most strongly attached whites as compared to those who worked just before the birth but not immediately after was approximately 13 percent. Among the blacks studied, there was a distinctly smaller wage premium, amounting to 6 percent at the most, associated with greater lifetime work experience. The authors conclude that policies aimed at facilitating retention of employment at the outset of childbearing might not only contribute to a greater supply of female workers but could eventually lead to demand-side changes that would enhance women's opportunities for advancement in the labor market.
Bibliography Citation
Shapiro, David and Frank L. Mott. "Long-Term Employment and Earnings of Women in Relation to Employment Behavior Surrounding the First Birth." Presented: Minneapolis, MN, Donner Foundation - University of Minnesota Industrial Relations Center Workshop on the Economic Well-Being of Women and Children, 1991.
135. Shaw, Lois B.
D'Amico, Ronald
Gagen, Mary G.
Gitter, Robert J.
Haurin, Donald R.
Morgan, William R.
Mott, Frank L.
Peters, Elizabeth
Dual Careers, Volume 6: Fifteen Year Report on the National Longitudinal Surveys Mature Women's Cohort
Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1985
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): Education; Employment; Family Constraints; Job Patterns; Marital Disruption; Marriage; Racial Differences

Fifteen years of data from the NLS cohort of Mature Women are analyzed. Chapter one describes the extent of the decreasing family responsibilities and increasing labor market involvement for these women over the fifteen-year period. Chapter two explores the employment patterns of white and black women following the birth of their first child. Chapter three examines the degree of responsibility given to women age 45 to 59 for the pay and promotion decisions of others. Chapter four describes the education the women received between 1967 and 1982, and chapter five examines the extent to which they increased their labor market involvement as a result of family disruptions or husband's employment or disability. Chapter six describes the factors that determine women's early withdrawal from the labor market. Chapter seven illustrates the usefulness of hazard rate models in exploring the transition from divorce to remarriage and finds a striking difference in the mean duration to remarriage between whites and non-whites. Chapter eight focuses on the retirement plans and expected pension of white and black middle aged women.
Bibliography Citation
Shaw, Lois B., Ronald D'Amico, Mary G. Gagen, Robert J. Gitter, Donald R. Haurin, William R. Morgan, Frank L. Mott and Elizabeth Peters. Dual Careers, Volume 6: Fifteen Year Report on the National Longitudinal Surveys Mature Women's Cohort. Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1985.