Search Results

Author: Maxwell, Nan L.
Resulting in 22 citations.
1. D'Amico, Ronald
Maxwell, Nan L.
Employment During the School-to-Work Transition: An Explanation for Subsequent Black-White Wage Differentials and Bifurcation of Black Income
Presented: Toronto, Canada, Population Association of America Meetings, May 1990
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Dropouts; Employment; Income; Labor Force Participation; Racial Differences; Regions; Transition, School to Work; Wage Differentials; Work Experience

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study examines the divergence in black-white income and bifurcation in black income for young males in the 1980s. By integrating school-to-work transition literature with black-white research on vintage effects and income bifurcation, a framework is established for linking employment during the school-to-work transition and subsequent wage divergence. The authors empirically confirm this link using data from the NLSY. The results suggest that the higher rates of black youth joblessness during the 1980s directly translate into black-white wage divergence of youth and bifurcation of black income.
Bibliography Citation
D'Amico, Ronald and Nan L. Maxwell. "Employment During the School-to-Work Transition: An Explanation for Subsequent Black-White Wage Differentials and Bifurcation of Black Income." Presented: Toronto, Canada, Population Association of America Meetings, May 1990.
2. D'Amico, Ronald
Maxwell, Nan L.
The Impact of Post-School Joblessness on Male Black-White Wage Differentials
Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economy and Society 33,2 (April 1994): 184-205.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1468-232X.1994.tb00335.x/pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Institute of Industrial Relations, University of California, Berkeley
Keyword(s): Employment, Youth; Racial Differences; Transition, School to Work; Unemployment, Youth; Wage Differentials

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study examines the employment undercurrents of the divergence in black-white wages for young males in the 1980s. By integrating school-to-work transition literature with black-white research on earnings differences, we establish a framework for linking employment during the school-to-work transition and subsequent wage differentials. We empirically confirm this link using the youth cohort of the National Longitudinal Surveys. Results suggest that the higher rates of joblessness among a subset of black youth directly translate into lower earnings for blacks and produce black-white wage divergence. Young black males with extremely high levels of joblessness during the school-to-work period face the greatest reduction in relative wages.
Bibliography Citation
D'Amico, Ronald and Nan L. Maxwell. "The Impact of Post-School Joblessness on Male Black-White Wage Differentials." Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economy and Society 33,2 (April 1994): 184-205.
3. Maxwell, Nan L.
Basic Skills, Occupational Training, and Wage Differentials Between Young Black and White Males
Presented: Washington, DC, Population Association of America Meetings, 1991
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB); Education; Job Tenure; Job Training; Occupations; Racial Differences; Skills; Training, Occupational; Wage Differentials; Wages, Young Men

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper empirically examines the interrelationships between prelabor market skills, on-the-job training as it occurs within occupations, wages, and race. Using data from the NLSY, the lower level of basic skills of blacks is linked to subsequent wage reductions and racial wage differentials. While fewer prelabor market skills do not directly reduce on-the-job training, blacks' employment in less skilled occupations does impede their acquisition of on-the-job training. Thus, blacks' lower level of both prelabor market and labor market skill accumulation is a primary determination of racial wage differentials for youth. In fact, by increasing blacks' basic skills and occupational training to white levels, racial wage differences all but disappear.
Bibliography Citation
Maxwell, Nan L. "Basic Skills, Occupational Training, and Wage Differentials Between Young Black and White Males." Presented: Washington, DC, Population Association of America Meetings, 1991.
4. Maxwell, Nan L.
Economic Returns to Migration: Marital Status and Gender Differences
Social Science Quarterly 68,1 (March 1988): 108-121
Cohort(s): Young Men, Young Women
Publisher: University of Texas Press
Keyword(s): Earnings; Family Influences; Marital Status; Migration

Permission to reprint the abstract has been denied by the publisher.

Bibliography Citation
Maxwell, Nan L. "Economic Returns to Migration: Marital Status and Gender Differences." Social Science Quarterly 68,1 (March 1988): 108-121.
5. Maxwell, Nan L.
Fertility Policy and Employment: Implications from the Former Soviet Union
Population Research and Policy Review 17 (1998): 351-368.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/j8762q3k1vt75qw7/
Cohort(s): Mature Women, NLSY79, Young Women
Publisher: Kluwer Academic Publishers
Keyword(s): Cross-national Analysis; Data Quality/Consistency; Demography; Employment; Fertility; Russia, Russian

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

NLS data (Mature and Young Women and NLSY79) were used as the benchmark for Russians in this study: Using individual-level survey data that were collected in Russia in 1993, we analyze the fertility-employment relationship for a sample of urban women who bore children during the Soviet era. Although some Russian policy makers advocate policies that reduce female employment to stimulate fertility, we find little empirical support to ensure success of these policies. Specifically, we find no connection between employment and fertility for our sample of Russian females, perhaps because of their historic, mandated commitment to the labor market. Instead, we find that demographics and attitudes influence fertility decision making. These results, in combination with the findings that our sample of Russian women hold more 'traditional' attitudes toward family and 'egalitanan' attitudes toward work than similar American women, suggest that policies to stimulate fertility by reducing employment may not be effective for women raised during the Soviet era unless a dramatic shift in attitudes away from a strong work commitment also occurs.
Bibliography Citation
Maxwell, Nan L. "Fertility Policy and Employment: Implications from the Former Soviet Union." Population Research and Policy Review 17 (1998): 351-368.
6. Maxwell, Nan L.
Individual and Aggregate Influences on the Age at First Birth
Population Research and Policy Review 10,1 (1991): 27-46.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/v378603h76581167/
Cohort(s): Mature Women, Young Women
Publisher: Kluwer Academic Publishers
Keyword(s): Age at First Birth; Childbearing; First Birth; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study examines the influence of individual demand factors and aggregate period and cohort effects on the age at first childbirth for blacks, whites, and three cohorts of mothers. Data from the NLS of Mature Women and Young Women were used to construct three birth cohorts of women: women born between 1923 and 1929, 1930 and 1937, and 1944 and 1954. Results reconcile the discrepancy between increased opportunity cost of childbearing and decreased age at first childbirth by showing dominate aggregate influences for blacks and for more recent cohorts of women. For the early baby-boom cohort, there is a relative strengthening in the influence of both aggregate period and cohort effects and individual demand factors on initial childbearing timing. The study also uncovers potential estimation bias in examining age at first childbirth with indirect aggregate influences operating through individual factors for recent cohorts and spurious correlation existing between individual factors and aggregate influences.
Bibliography Citation
Maxwell, Nan L. "Individual and Aggregate Influences on the Age at First Birth." Population Research and Policy Review 10,1 (1991): 27-46.
7. Maxwell, Nan L.
Influences on the Timing of First Childbearing
Contemporary Policy Issues 5,2 (April 1987): 113-121.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1465-7287.1987.tb00260.x/abstract
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: Western Economic Association International
Keyword(s): Age at First Birth; Childbearing; First Birth; Mothers, Race

This paper presents evidence that women from different population subgroups respond differently to economic and background influences when timing initial childbearing. Among all groups examined, age at first birth tends to increase as education levels increase, and married women with spouses present tend to be older than other women at first childbirth. Among whites, all economic influences considered - hourly pay rate, nonmarket income, and work during the year prior to childbearing - have a significant influence in deferring first childbirth, but family background does not. Among blacks, family background plays a significant role in determining age at first childbirth, but only one economic influence - the hourly pay rate - is significant. Blacks' response to family background is somewhat greater than their response to hourly pay rate. Race as a separate influence is significant among women age 20 years or under, but that influence disappears among older women. Because of their adverse economic consequences, adolescent pregnancies and unwed motherhood are of mounting concern. This study suggests that, contrary to popular belief, welfare programs do not foster early pregnancy nor do programs to reduce unemployment deter it. Educational achievement, however, serves as a deterrent to early pregnancy among all groups.
Bibliography Citation
Maxwell, Nan L. "Influences on the Timing of First Childbearing." Contemporary Policy Issues 5,2 (April 1987): 113-121.
8. Maxwell, Nan L.
Labor Market Effects from Involuntary Job Losses in Layoffs and Plant Closings: The Role of Human Capital in Facilitating Reemployment and Reduced Wage Loss
American Journal of Economics and Sociology 48,2 (April 1989): 129-141.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1536-7150.1989.tb02106.x/abstract
Cohort(s): Young Men, Young Women
Publisher: American Journal of Economics and Sociology, Inc.
Keyword(s): Displaced Workers; Family Income; Human Capital; Layoffs; Re-employment; Training; Unemployment; Wages

A study examined a sample of young men and women, drawn from the National Longitudinal Surveys of Labor Market Experience, to determine the extent to which unemployment and wage change after involuntary job termination were related to human capital accumulation prior to displacement. The results indicated that human capital serves as a productivity signal to new employers. It was found that workers with more firm- specific and general human capital, as manifested by higher predisplacement wages, were less likely to suffer wage loss and unemployment. Workers who showed little commitment to the labor force or were victims of bias - low skill, clerical or sales workers, females, and relatively low contributors to the family income - were unlikely candidates for reemployment. These individuals will be greatly harmed by job termination, as some of these characteristics (low skill and female) are also associated with greater wage loss. (ABI/Inform)
Bibliography Citation
Maxwell, Nan L. "Labor Market Effects from Involuntary Job Losses in Layoffs and Plant Closings: The Role of Human Capital in Facilitating Reemployment and Reduced Wage Loss." American Journal of Economics and Sociology 48,2 (April 1989): 129-141.
9. Maxwell, Nan L.
Occupational Differences in the Determination of U.S. Workers' Earnings: Both the Human Capital and the Structured Labor Market Hypotheses Are Useful in Analysis
American Journal of Economics and Sociology 46,4 (October 1987): 431-443.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1536-7150.1987.tb01990.x/abstract
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: American Journal of Economics and Sociology, Inc.
Keyword(s): Dual Economic Theory; Earnings; Human Capital; Labor Market, Secondary; Occupations

A fundamental ongoing debate has centered on whether there exists a single competitive labor market or whether structural impediments create mobility barriers and establish multiple self-contained labor markets. Using data from the older men's panel of the National Longitudinal Survey of Work Experience (NLS), path analysis, and occupationally stratified samples, an empirical study tested the interaction of human capital and segmented labor market theories. Results showed that the dominant forces in earnings determination within labor markets differ. Within the primary segment, characterized by desirable jobs with high wages, job security, and mobility on promotional ladders, workers are rewarded for human capital accumulation and individual productivity matters. In the secondary segment, covering jobs with low wages, high turnover, and poor working conditions, human capital accumulation is not rewarded heavily and structural influences dominate the earnings determination process. (ABI/Inform)
Bibliography Citation
Maxwell, Nan L. "Occupational Differences in the Determination of U.S. Workers' Earnings: Both the Human Capital and the Structured Labor Market Hypotheses Are Useful in Analysis." American Journal of Economics and Sociology 46,4 (October 1987): 431-443.
10. Maxwell, Nan L.
Occupational Segregation and Wages: Is There Long Run Convergence Among Young Male and Female Workers?
Presented: Toronto, Canada, Population Association of America Meetings, May 1990
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): College Education; Educational Attainment; Educational Returns; Gender Differences; Mobility; Mobility, Occupational; Occupational Segregation; Wages

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using data from the NLSY, this study empirically examines occupational and wage mobility of high school and college educated males and females in the first five years after school leaving. College-educated males exhibit the greatest occupational mobility with their movement into management positions. While females, irrespective of educational level, are overwhelmingly employed as clericals throughout the five year period, the movement of high school-educated females into the clerical field suggests that these females will spend nearly half their work lives as clericals. Reflecting this occupational movement, wage growth during the five year period is greatest for college-educated males. College- educated females experienced half as large a growth as their male counterpart and nearly equivalent wage growth as high school-educated males.
Bibliography Citation
Maxwell, Nan L. "Occupational Segregation and Wages: Is There Long Run Convergence Among Young Male and Female Workers?" Presented: Toronto, Canada, Population Association of America Meetings, May 1990.
11. Maxwell, Nan L.
Retirement Implications of Industrial and Occupational Labor Market Segmentation
Ph.D. Dissertation, Florida State University, 1983
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: UMI - University Microfilms, Bell and Howell Information and Learning
Keyword(s): Dual Economic Theory; Income; Retirement

This research explored the extent to which industrial and occupational labor market segments, labor market institutions, and human capital accumulation impact on a worker's labor market and retirement income. Using data from the Older Men's cohort of the NLS and a path analytic estimation procedure, results supported the hypothesis that labor market segments and market institutions exert a powerful impact on labor market earnings and that these influences extend into retirement. Labor market segments exert a more powerful impact on earnings than human capital variables as well as dictate the return on human capital investments while a worker is in the labor market. Labor market segments continue their impact on income once a worker withdraws from the labor force by influencing both the level and source of retirement income.
Bibliography Citation
Maxwell, Nan L. Retirement Implications of Industrial and Occupational Labor Market Segmentation. Ph.D. Dissertation, Florida State University, 1983.
12. Maxwell, Nan L.
Russian Fertility and Labor Supply: Implications for Fertility Policy
Presented: San Francisco, CA, Population Association of America Meetings, 1995
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Birth Rate; Cross-national Analysis; Demography; Fertility; Labor Force Participation; Labor Market Demographics; Labor Market Studies, Geographic; Labor Supply; Local Labor Market; Russia, Russian; Social Influences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using both individual-level survey data that was collected in Russia, three panels of data from the National Longitudinal Surveys, and aggregate-level data from Russia and the U.S., this paper examines the determinants of fertility for Russian women. Although many Russian policy makers advocate policies to reduce female levels of employment to stimulate fertility, we find little empirical support to ensure success of this policy. Specifically, in contrast to American females whose fertility is intertwined with labor market behavior, we find no connection between labor supply and fertility for Russian females. Instead, aggregate social, demographic, and economic conditions influence fertility levels. As such, results of this study suggest that Russian policies designed to decrease female labor force participation will be ineffective at increasing birth rates in absence of change in the country's social and economic structure.
Bibliography Citation
Maxwell, Nan L. "Russian Fertility and Labor Supply: Implications for Fertility Policy." Presented: San Francisco, CA, Population Association of America Meetings, 1995.
13. Maxwell, Nan L.
The Effect of Human Capital and Labor Market Segments on Retirement Income: A Policy Analysis
Social Science Quarterly 67,1 (March 1986): 53-68
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: University of Texas Press
Keyword(s): Dual Economic Theory; Human Capital Theory; Income; Pensions; Retirement; Social Security; Wages

Permission to reprint the abstract has been denied by the publisher.

Bibliography Citation
Maxwell, Nan L. "The Effect of Human Capital and Labor Market Segments on Retirement Income: A Policy Analysis." Social Science Quarterly 67,1 (March 1986): 53-68.
14. Maxwell, Nan L.
The Effect on Black-White Wage Differences of Differences in the Quantity and Quality of Education
Industrial and Labor Relations Review 47,2 (January 1994): 249-264.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2524419
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Cornell University Press
Keyword(s): Education; Educational Attainment; Educational Returns; Racial Differences; Schooling; Wage Differentials

Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth for black-white differences in educational attainment, educational quality, and unmeasured individual ability can explain black-white wage differences. An analysis that corrects for both selectivity and ability biases inherent in estimating the education-wage relationship shows that the main source of the black-white wage differential is the racial difference in the quality rather than quantity of schooling. In fact, the author concludes, closing the racial gap in the basic skills learned in school could reduce the wage differential by two-thirds. Reprinted by permission of the publisher.
Bibliography Citation
Maxwell, Nan L. "The Effect on Black-White Wage Differences of Differences in the Quantity and Quality of Education." Industrial and Labor Relations Review 47,2 (January 1994): 249-264.
15. Maxwell, Nan L.
The Impact of Preretirement Labor Market Experience on Postretirement Well-being
Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1981.
Also: http://catalogue.nla.gov.au/Record/5406728
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): Health Factors; Income; Life Satisfaction; Racial Differences; Retirement; Well-Being

A study was conducted to determine labor market factors influencing one's psychological well being and economic security after retirement. Research was found that supported the hypotheses that a worker's employment, earnings, and industry in the labor force greatly affect a retiree's financial position; the reason for labor force withdrawal influences economic position and outlook toward life; a positive relationship exists between income and life satisfaction; and health problems and job satisfaction influence life satisfaction after retirement. Data were drawn from the older men's cohort of the National Longitudinal Surveys of Work Experience. A logarithmic function of the income received from pension and Social Security was used to measure income. Life satisfaction was measured by response to a question regarding how happy the respondent was with his life. It was found that workers with successful labor market experiences were likely to have a better financial situation in retirement that was transmitted into greater life satisfaction. Whites appeared psychologically affected by job loss, while blacks' ties to the labor market were purely financial. Life satisfaction was not related to the comparison of retirement to preretirement income but was related to the absolute level of income after retirement.
Bibliography Citation
Maxwell, Nan L. The Impact of Preretirement Labor Market Experience on Postretirement Well-being. Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1981..
16. Maxwell, Nan L.
The Retirement Experience: Psychological and Financial Linkages to the Labor Market
Social Science Quarterly 66,1 (March 1985): 22-33.
Also: http://law.vanderbilt.edu/faculty/faculty-personal-sites/joni--hersch/publications/download.aspx?id=856
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: University of Texas Press
Keyword(s): Health Factors; Income Dynamics/Shocks; Retirement; Well-Being; Work Attitudes

Permission to reprint the abstract has been denied by the publisher.

Bibliography Citation
Maxwell, Nan L. "The Retirement Experience: Psychological and Financial Linkages to the Labor Market." Social Science Quarterly 66,1 (March 1985): 22-33.
17. Maxwell, Nan L.
D'Amico, Ronald
Employment and Wage Effects of Involuntary Job Separation: Male-Female Differences
American Economic Review 76,2 (May 1986): 373-377.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1818799
Cohort(s): Young Men, Young Women
Publisher: American Economic Association
Keyword(s): Displaced Workers; Gender Differences; Job Turnover; Labor Force Participation; Wage Effects

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

A study is undertaken to determine if women fare better or worse than men upon job termination. Analysis examines the role human capital and institutional factors play in explaining the consequences following involuntary job termination. Data are taken from the Young Men and Young Women's panels of the NLS. The results indicate that, while males may have increased displacement rates, once females lose their jobs, they are more likely to have difficulty recovering their initial labor market positions. Striking employment differentials between the sexes exist after displacement, with female unemployment rates about 2 1/2 times greater than rates for males. With prolonged unemployment, women are much more likely to drop out of the workforce than men. Much of the differential can be attributed to gender or to gender-related characteristics. Evidence also suggests that, net of human capital and institutional influences, displaced females also suffer greater wage loss than males.
Bibliography Citation
Maxwell, Nan L. and Ronald D'Amico. "Employment and Wage Effects of Involuntary Job Separation: Male-Female Differences." American Economic Review 76,2 (May 1986): 373-377.
18. Maxwell, Nan L.
Duffas, Lu Ann
A Life-Cycle Model of Female Labor Supply
Presented: Baltimore, MD, Population Association of America Meetings, 1989
Cohort(s): Mature Women, Young Women
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Educational Attainment; Fertility; Heterogeneity; Labor Force Participation; Labor Supply; Life Cycle Research; Women

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

A formal life-cycle model of female labor supply is developed in which a woman alters her human capital decision- making in accordance with expected life-cycle events. Within such a model, observed state dependence in labor force participation results from either heterogeneity in human capital and child service stock or from constraints on woman's decision-making. By identifying the direct relationship between children and human capital accumulation, the authors clarify the role of life-cycle events on permanent wages. By integrating this relationship into a system of choice and a system of all-or-nothing options, the multitude of influences on a woman's lifetime labor force participation decision are more easily untangled.
Bibliography Citation
Maxwell, Nan L. and Lu Ann Duffas. "A Life-Cycle Model of Female Labor Supply." Presented: Baltimore, MD, Population Association of America Meetings, 1989.
19. Maxwell, Nan L.
Mott, Frank L.
Trends in the Determinants of Early Childbearing
Population and Environment 9,2 (Summer 1987): 59-73.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/27503065
Cohort(s): NLSY79, Young Women
Publisher: Plenum Publishing Corporation
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Childbearing; Contraception; Fertility; First Birth; Mothers, Race; Racial Differences; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

This study uses data from the Young Women and NLSY cohorts to examine the extent to which socioeconomic background factors and race have changed in their ability to predict a first birth before age 19 between 1968 and 1980 for women aged 19 to 23. The authors find little support for their hypothesis that the increasing availability of contraception and abortion for young women from all social classes reduces the traditionally strong inverse association between social class and early childbearing. There is evidence that, even after controlling for changes in socioeconomic background factors, black young women are significantly more likely than their white counterparts to bear children before age 19 in 1980 and the relative gap between races in this regard did not alter perceptibly during that period.
Bibliography Citation
Maxwell, Nan L. and Frank L. Mott. "Trends in the Determinants of Early Childbearing." Population and Environment 9,2 (Summer 1987): 59-73.
20. Maxwell, Nan L.
Mott, Frank L.
Trends in the Determinants of Early Childbearing
Presented: Chicago, IL, Population Association of America Annual Meetings, April-May 1987
Cohort(s): NLSY79, Young Women
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Childbearing; Contraception; Fertility; First Birth; Mothers, Race; Racial Differences; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study uses data from the Young Women and NLSY cohorts to examine the extent to which socioeconomic background factors and race have changed in their ability to predict a first birth before age 19 between 1968 and 1980 for women aged 19 to 23. The authors find little support for their hypothesis that the increasing availability of contraception and abortion for young women from all social classes reduces the traditionally strong inverse association between social class and early childbearing. There is evidence that, even after controlling for changes in socioeconomic background factors, black young women are significantly more likely than their white counterparts to bear children before age 19 in 1980 and the relative gap between races in this regard did not alter perceptibly during that period.
Bibliography Citation
Maxwell, Nan L. and Frank L. Mott. "Trends in the Determinants of Early Childbearing." Presented: Chicago, IL, Population Association of America Annual Meetings, April-May 1987.
21. Mott, Frank L.
Maxwell, Nan L.
Early Fertility Behavior of Non-College Bound Youth: Trends and Consequences
Working Paper, Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, Columbus, 1981
Cohort(s): NLSY79, Young Women
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Behavior; Fertility; First Birth; Household Composition

Using data from the 1976 NLS Young Women's cohort and the 1979 NLSY, this study compares the early childbearing behavior of young women in the late 1960s and 1970s. It contrasts separately for black and white non-college bound women the percentages who had a first birth while still in high school, their family situations, socioeconomic characteristics, access to income support, employment situations and their future employment intentions.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L. and Nan L. Maxwell. "Early Fertility Behavior of Non-College Bound Youth: Trends and Consequences." Working Paper, Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, Columbus, 1981.
22. Mott, Frank L.
Maxwell, Nan L.
School-Age Mothers: 1968-1979
Family Planning Perspectives 13,6 (November-December 1981): 287-292.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2134593
Cohort(s): NLSY79, Young Women
Publisher: Alan Guttmacher Institute
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Adolescent Fertility; Childbearing, Adolescent; Children; Dropouts; Fertility; High School Completion/Graduates; Household Composition; Mothers; Mothers, Behavior; Teenagers; Unemployment; Welfare

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using data from the 1968 NLS of Young Women and the 1979 NLSY, this study compares the early childbearing behavior of young women in the late 1960s and 1970s. It contrasts separately for black and white non-college bound women the percentages who had a first birth while still in high school, their family situations, socioeconomic characteristics, access to income support, employment situations and their future employment intentions.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L. and Nan L. Maxwell. "School-Age Mothers: 1968-1979." Family Planning Perspectives 13,6 (November-December 1981): 287-292.