Search Results

Author: Haurin, R. Jean
Resulting in 33 citations.
1. D'Amico, Ronald
Haurin, R. Jean
Mott, Frank L.
Effect of Mother's Employment on Adolescent and Early Adult Outcomes of Young Men and Women
In: Children of Working Parents: Experiences and Outcomes. C. Hayes and S. Kammerman, eds. Washington, DC: National Academy Press, 1983
Cohort(s): Mature Women, Young Men, Young Women
Publisher: National Academy Press
Keyword(s): Children; Educational Attainment; Mothers; Sex Roles; Teenagers

This research uses data from mother-daughter and mother-son pairs to examine the effects of mother's employment on her children's educational attainments, early adult sex role attitudes, career attainments, fertility expectations and plans to work. Measures of mother's employment include several items tapping the extent of her labor force participation when her children were still young. The models also include measures of mother's educational attainment and sex role attitudes as controls. None of the measures of mother's employment has any important effect on any of the outcome measures of either sons or daughters. However, mother's educational attainment and sex role attitudes did have some strong effects, especially for daughters.
Bibliography Citation
D'Amico, Ronald, R. Jean Haurin and Frank L. Mott. "Effect of Mother's Employment on Adolescent and Early Adult Outcomes of Young Men and Women" In: Children of Working Parents: Experiences and Outcomes. C. Hayes and S. Kammerman, eds. Washington, DC: National Academy Press, 1983
2. Garasky, Steven
Haurin, R. Jean
Haurin, Donald R.
Group Living Decisions as Youth Transition to Adulthood: The Effect of Local Shelter Costs
Presented: Washington, DC, Population Association of America Meetings, March 1997
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Family Formation; Family Income; Family Studies; Household Models; Local Labor Market; Migration; Migration Patterns; Modeling, Hazard/Event History/Survival/Duration

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study follows teens through their young adulthood as they make the transition to independent living. Our hypotheses are that the probability of leaving the parental household is lower in higher real cost of shelter localities, and that, conditional on choosing to leave the parental household, the probability of their living in large groups of unrelated adults is higher in communities with relatively higher shelter costs. Data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth are merged with house price and rental data obtained from Freddie Mac-Fannie Mae and from Coldwell Banker. The unit of analysis is a person/year. The method is a discrete hazard model within a multinomial logit framework that allows for more than one possible state transition. We believe that our study is important for a broad PAA audience including students of family formation, housing and real estate, family economics, migration, and local macroeconomics.
Bibliography Citation
Garasky, Steven, R. Jean Haurin and Donald R. Haurin. "Group Living Decisions as Youth Transition to Adulthood: The Effect of Local Shelter Costs." Presented: Washington, DC, Population Association of America Meetings, March 1997.
3. Garasky, Steven
Haurin, R. Jean
Haurin, Donald R.
Group Living Decisions as Youths Transition to Adulthood
Journal of Population Economics 14,2 (June 2001): 329-349.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/qcm491pdrv032t5j/
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Home Environment; Household Composition; Mobility; Teenagers

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study follows teens through young adulthood as they transition to independent living. We focus on a little studied issue: why some youths live in groups rather than alone or with parents. This choice is important because the size of the group has a substantial impact on the demand for dwelling units; the more youths per dwelling the lower is aggregate demand and the greater is population density. Our study also adds to the knowledge of which factors influence youths' choice of destination as they leave the parental home. The empirical testing uses a discrete hazard model within a multinomial logit framework to allow for more than one possible state transition. We find that economic variables have little impact on the decision of whether to exit to a large versus a small group, while socio-demographic variables matter. We also test a new push-pull hypothesis and find that the pull of economic variables on the probability of exiting the parental home increases as youths reach their mid to late twenties.
Bibliography Citation
Garasky, Steven, R. Jean Haurin and Donald R. Haurin. "Group Living Decisions as Youths Transition to Adulthood." Journal of Population Economics 14,2 (June 2001): 329-349.
4. Haurin, Donald R.
Haurin, R. Jean
Net Migration, Unemployment, and the Business Cycle
Journal of Regional Science 28,2 (May 1988): 239-253.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1467-9787.1988.tb01211.x/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Business Cycles; Endogeneity; Job Turnover; Local Labor Market; Migration; Mobility, Job; Unemployment Rate

An empirical test of the effects of exogenous shocks upon a region's population size is conducted in the framework of an equilibrium locational model. The model emphasizes the separation of endogenous from exogenous factors, a point omitted in most empirical studies of aggregate migration. Exogenous changes are manifested in the local relative cost of living and the local relative unemployment rate. Hypotheses are supported in analyses of data from both the NLSY as well as Census. Surprisingly, a simple measure of the size of a shock to a regional economy has the greatest explanatory power compared with more sophisticated measures based on prior business cycles.
Bibliography Citation
Haurin, Donald R. and R. Jean Haurin. "Net Migration, Unemployment, and the Business Cycle." Journal of Regional Science 28,2 (May 1988): 239-253.
5. Haurin, Donald R.
Haurin, R. Jean
The Migration of Youth and the Business Cycle: 1978 to 1984
Economic Development Quarterly 1,2 (May 1987): 162-169.
Also: http://edq.sagepub.com/content/1/2/162.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Business Cycles; Labor Force Participation; Labor Supply; Manpower Programs; Migration

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study investigates whether the relocational choices of youth correspond to the business cycle, and identifies other correlates with relocation decisions. Analysis is based on a state's viewpoint and policy questions are evaluated in this context. The authors find that the migration of youth is highly cyclical and that in a downturn relative to the rest of the nation, a state can lose a substantial proportion of its youth, the group forming the next generation of a state's labor supply. The coordination of redevelopment goals calls for states to not only concentrate on attracting desired types of employers, but also on retaining a labor force with the appropriate skills. In particular, the study indicates that midwestern states which have recently focused on attracting "high-tech" industries have simultaneously lost their brightest and most highly motivated youth. Some support was found for the hypothesis that a state supported jobs program can tide youth over the downturn and raise their long-term retention probability.
Bibliography Citation
Haurin, Donald R. and R. Jean Haurin. "The Migration of Youth and the Business Cycle: 1978 to 1984." Economic Development Quarterly 1,2 (May 1987): 162-169.
6. Haurin, Donald R.
Haurin, R. Jean
Youth Migration in Deindustrializing Regions of the United States
Presented: Cambridge, UK, Regional Science Association Twenty-Ninth European Congress, August 1989
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Regional Science Association International
Keyword(s): Geographical Variation; Migration; Mobility, Labor Market; Unemployment; Wages

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Because youth are the most mobile cohort in the U.S., theories about the causes of migration are best tested upon this subgroup. The focus of this research is to analyze the causes of out-migration and return migration of youth in a region of the U.S. that is in the process of decreasing employment in its manufacturing sector and increasing employment in its service sector, that is, the "rust belt". There are three major topics in the research. The first measures the aggregate amount of out and net youth migration from a deindustrializing region in the U.S. Migration in each year (1979-1987) in this region is compared to that in a similarly sized area where manufacturing employment increased. The second topic uses micro data to analyze the determinants of a youth's length of stay in a region. The empirical model allows for censoring and for time-varying explanatory factors and thus, corresponds to the temporal sequence of the locational decision-making process of youth. The third topic uses the same micro data set to analyze remigration to the home (deindustrializing) region. Here, the authors attempt to identify the characteristics of youth that are correlated with a successful out-migration. The empirical model again uses duration methods for analysis. Utilizing data from the 1979-1987 NLSY, the authors test for the factors that affect the migration decision of youth and then compare these results with their model of the remigration decision of previous out-migrants. The application is to a deindustrializing region of the U.S. and the results are contrasted with those for a region of similar spatial size which experienced growth in manufacturing employment.
Bibliography Citation
Haurin, Donald R. and R. Jean Haurin. "Youth Migration in Deindustrializing Regions of the United States." Presented: Cambridge, UK, Regional Science Association Twenty-Ninth European Congress, August 1989.
7. Haurin, Donald R.
Haurin, R. Jean
Youth Migration in the United States: An Analysis of a Deindustrializing Region
In: Migration Models: Macro and Micro Perspectives. J. Stillwell and P. Congdon, eds. London, England: Belhaven Press, 1990
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Belhaven Press
Keyword(s): Gender Differences; Migration; Regions; Wages

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The focus of this research is to present a methodology appropriate for analyzing the causes of out-migration and return migration of youth. The application is to a region of the U.S. that is in the process of decreasing employment in its manufacturing sector and increasing employment in its service sector (the region is popularly known as the 'rust belt'). A longitudinal series of observations of individuals and families is used to analyze the determinants of the length of stay in a region. The empirical model allows for time-varying explanatory factors and thus corresponds to the temporal sequence of the locational decision-making process. Explanatory factors include measures of the potential benefits of migration (a higher expected wage or probability of employment) and measures that influence the cost of migration. Results indicate that the likelihood of outmigration is influenced by the probability of obtaining a job in the alternative area and some measures of the cost of relocation (for example, loss of job tenure). The same data set is used to analyze remigration to the home (deindustrializing) region. The empirical model uses duration methods for analysis and results indicate that remigration is only related to relatively long periods of personal unemployment in the new location.
Bibliography Citation
Haurin, Donald R. and R. Jean Haurin. "Youth Migration in the United States: An Analysis of a Deindustrializing Region" In: Migration Models: Macro and Micro Perspectives. J. Stillwell and P. Congdon, eds. London, England: Belhaven Press, 1990
8. Haurin, Donald R.
Parcel, Toby L.
Haurin, R. Jean
Does Homeownership Affect Child Outcomes?
Real Estate Economics 30,4 (Winter 2002):635-667.
Also: http://search.epnet.com/direct.asp?an=7717323&db=buh
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association (AREUEA)
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Behavior; Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Behavioral Problems; Children, Behavioral Development; Cognitive Ability; Home Environment; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Home Ownership; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The data set that forms the basis for our analysis is the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY), augmented by the NLSY-Child Data. We study the impact of homeowning on the cognitive and behavioral outcomes of children. Using four waves of a comprehensive national panel data set, we control for many social, demographic and economic variables previously found to influence child outcomes. The data are a panel, allowing us to control for unobserved household-and child-specific factors. We use a treatment effects model to address the issue of possible sample selection bias caused by unobserved variables that influence both the parent's choice of whether to own or rent and whether to invest in their children. We find that owning a home compared with renting leads to a 13 to 23% higher quality home environment, greater cognitive ability and fewer child behavior problems. For children living in owned homes, math achievement is up to 9% higher, reading achievement is up to 7% higher, and children's behavioral problems are 1 to 3% lower. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Haurin, Donald R., Toby L. Parcel and R. Jean Haurin. "Does Homeownership Affect Child Outcomes?" Real Estate Economics 30,4 (Winter 2002):635-667.
9. Haurin, Donald R.
Parcel, Toby L.
Haurin, R. Jean
The Impact of Home Ownership on Child Outcomes
Presented: Boston, MA, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, Allied Social Science Association Meetings, January 2000
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association (AREUEA)
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Behavioral Problems; Cognitive Ability; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Income; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Wages, Adult; Wages, Men; Wages, Women; Wealth

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We analyze the impact of home owning on the cognitive and behavioral outcomes of children. Our study controls for many social, demographic and economic variables previously found to influence child outcomes. We also address the issue of possible sample selection bias caused by unobserved variables that influence both the parent's choice of whether to own or rent and parental investment in their children. The study uses four waves of a national data set, permitting a panel data analysis of the relationship of owning a home to three child outcomes: math achievement, reading recognition and behavior problems. Using panel data allows us to control for household and child-specific, unobserved, influential factors. We also use a treatment effects model to address the problem of sample selection bias. We find that owning a home compared with renting leads to a higher quality home environment, the improvement being 16 to 22 percent. Considering both the direct and indirect effects of home ownership on child outcomes, we find that for children living in owned homes, math achievement is up to seven percent higher and reading achievement is up to six percent higher, ceteris paribus. We also find that the measure of a child's behavior problems is up to four percent lower if the child resides in an owned home. Existing literature suggests that these youth's greater cognitive abilities and fewer behavioral problems will result in higher educational attainment, greater future earnings, and a reduced tendency to engage in deviant behaviors.
Bibliography Citation
Haurin, Donald R., Toby L. Parcel and R. Jean Haurin. "The Impact of Home Ownership on Child Outcomes." Presented: Boston, MA, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, Allied Social Science Association Meetings, January 2000.
10. Haurin, Donald R.
Parcel, Toby L.
Haurin, R. Jean
The Impact of Home Ownership on Child Outcomes
In: Low-income Homeownership: Examining the Unexamined Goal. Nicholas P. Retsinas and Eric S. Belsky, eds. Washington, DC: Brookings Institution Press, 2002: pp. 427-446
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Brookings Institution
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Behavioral Problems; Children, Behavioral Development; Home Environment; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Home Ownership; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Residence

We analyze the impact of home owning on the cognitive and behavioral outcomes of children. Our study controls for many social, demographic, and economic variables previously found to influence child outcomes. We also address the issue of possible sample selection bias caused by unobserved variables that influence both the parent's choice of whether to own or rent and parental investment in their children.

The study uses four waves of a national data set, permitting a panel data analysis of the relationship of owning a home to three child outcomes: math achievement, reading recognition and behavior problems. Using panel data allows us to control for household and child-specific, unobserved, influential factors. We also use a treatment effects model to address the problem of sample selection bias.

We find that owning a home compared with renting leads to a higher quality home environment, the improvement being 16 to 22 percent. Considering both the direct and indirect effects of home ownership on child outcomes, we find that for children living in owned homes math achievement is up to seven percent higher and reading achievement is up to six percent higher, ceteris paribus. We also find that the measure of a child's behavior problems is up to four percent lower if the child resides in an owned home. Existing literature suggests that these youths' greater cognitive abilities and fewer behavioral problems will result in higher educational attainment, greater future earnings, and a reduced tendency to engage in deviant behaviors

Bibliography Citation
Haurin, Donald R., Toby L. Parcel and R. Jean Haurin. "The Impact of Home Ownership on Child Outcomes" In: Low-income Homeownership: Examining the Unexamined Goal. Nicholas P. Retsinas and Eric S. Belsky, eds. Washington, DC: Brookings Institution Press, 2002: pp. 427-446
11. Haurin, Donald R.
Parcel, Toby L.
Haurin, R. Jean
The Impact of Homeownership on Child Outcomes
Working Paper LIH0-01.14, Joint Center for Housing Studies, Harvard University, Cambridge MA, October 2001.
Also: http://www.jchs.harvard.edu/research/publications/impact-homeownership-child-outcomes
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Joint Center for Housing Studies of Harvard University
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Cognitive Ability; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Home Ownership; Income; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Residence; Wages, Adult; Wages, Men; Wages, Women; Wealth

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Does homeownership affect the outcomes of resident children? Using a national data set, we observed that children of homeowners have better home environments, high cognitive test scores, and fewer behavior problems than do children of renters. We find that these results hold even after controlling for a large number of economic, social, and demographic variables. Owning a home compared with renting leads to 13 to 23 percent higher quality home environment, ceteris paribus. The independent impact of homeownership combined with its positive impact on the home environment results in the children of owners achieving math scores up to nine percent higher, reading scores up to seven percent higher, and reductions in children's behavior problems of up to three percent. These findings suggest homeowners support programs should be targeted at households with young children.
Bibliography Citation
Haurin, Donald R., Toby L. Parcel and R. Jean Haurin. "The Impact of Homeownership on Child Outcomes." Working Paper LIH0-01.14, Joint Center for Housing Studies, Harvard University, Cambridge MA, October 2001.
12. Haurin, R. Jean
A Model of Educational Attainment from a Social Learning Perspective
M.A. Thesis, The Ohio State University, 1985
Cohort(s): Young Men, Young Women
Publisher: UMI - University Microfilms, Bell and Howell Information and Learning
Keyword(s): Educational Aspirations/Expectations; Educational Attainment; Family Influences; Fertility; Gender Differences; Marriage; Military Service; Parental Influences; Simultaneity

This paper develops a model of the individual educational attainment process using social learning theory as the framework. Hypotheses are developed concerning the influence of family background factors and significant others on educational achievement, aspirations, and educational attainment over a ten year period. Also considered are intervening life-cycle events such as marriage, fertility and military service which generally have not simultaneously been examined in previous research. Particular attention is devoted to sex differences in the educational attainment process. The model is empirically tested on nationally representative cohorts of males and females using two-stage least squares. The results provide support for the influence of the education of same-sex parent, income and parental encouragement as predicted by the social learning theory framework. However, further testing on data sets with greater detail on "significant other" relationships is advised. The results argue against using composites of parental characteristics. Mother's employment characteristics have little effect on the attainment process for either sex, while marriage and fertility events represent significant limitations only for females. Recommendations for future research include further development of attainment models for different race-gender groups. Particular attention should be given to investigating the impact of parental encouragement among these subgroups as well as to what differences in the educational attainment process obtain for youth from intact versus non-intact families.
Bibliography Citation
Haurin, R. Jean. A Model of Educational Attainment from a Social Learning Perspective. M.A. Thesis, The Ohio State University, 1985.
13. Haurin, R. Jean
Childhood Residence Patterns: Evidence from the National Longitudinal Surveys of Work Experience of Youth
Report, Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1991
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): Childhood Residence; Current Population Survey (CPS) / CPS-Fertility Supplement; Data Quality/Consistency; Gender Differences; Household Structure; Minorities, Youth; Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID); Racial Differences

This report summarizes the nature and quality of information collected on the childhood residence patterns of respondents in the NLSY. Evaluation of the data indicate that overall patterns compare quite favorably to other national data. Internal comparisons with residence items collected at earlier survey points also confirm the generally high reliability and quality of the data. Descriptive analyses reveal major variability in residence patterns by race and ethnicity for this cohort of youth growing up in the decades of the 1960s and 1970s. Minority children are less likely to live with both biological parents at birth than are white children and appear more likely to lose a parent over time, particularly during the preschool and elementary school years, ages critical to early educational development. While in general, few children reside without at least one parent, especially at the pre-adolescent ages, when these situations do occur, residence with grandparents is the most frequently encountered arrangement. Childhood residence patterns for racial and ethnic subgroups are discussed. Multivariate analyses of the effect of childhood residence characteristics on early adult outcomes indicate that white youth benefit significantly from the presence of two parents. Suggestions are made for future data collection and research inquiry especially with regard to step-family processes.
Bibliography Citation
Haurin, R. Jean. "Childhood Residence Patterns: Evidence from the National Longitudinal Surveys of Work Experience of Youth." Report, Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1991.
14. Haurin, R. Jean
Collection of Sibling Attributes: Some Data Quality Issues
Report, Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, December 1994
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): Age at First Birth; Childbearing; Data Quality/Consistency; Educational Attainment; Marital Conflict; Minorities; Nonresponse; Schooling; Siblings

This report summarizes the level and correlates of nonresponse for questionnaire items on sibling characteristics collected in the 1993 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. Results show that response rates are highest for items of information which are fairly stable about a sibling such as their gender and relative age. However, other characteristics which can vary over time or which generally occur after siblings depart the parental home have substantially higher levels of nonresponse. Examples include the amount of schooling or age at childbearing for a sibling. Minority respondents and respondents with lower levels of education themselves are less likely to be able to recall this more variable type of information about their siblings. Recall problems are also associated more often with older as opposed to younger siblings. Based on these findings, suggestions for improving upon future survey collection on sibling characteristics is offered.
Bibliography Citation
Haurin, R. Jean. "Collection of Sibling Attributes: Some Data Quality Issues." Report, Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, December 1994.
15. Haurin, R. Jean
Determinants of Fertility in Remarriage: An Analysis of White American Experience
Ph.D. Dissertation, The Ohio State University, 1992
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: UMI - University Microfilms, Bell and Howell Information and Learning
Keyword(s): Behavior; Fertility; Household Composition; Remarriage

This study examines how the context of remarriage influences expectations about future childbearing and the probability and timing of first births in marriage. Using longitudinal data for a contemporary cohort of white males and females, a descriptive overview of how fertility expectations change with alterations in marital status and how completed fertility is distributed across the marital history is presented. The study develops a general model of the determinants of the transition to first birth in marriage. This model is tested for both first and second marriage. A major finding is that the general model of fertility determination for short-term fertility expectations and behavior is the same for first and second marriage. While the general model is similar between marriages, this study finds that second-married individuals are significantly more likely to have a birth within two years of marriage than are first-marriers. However, second-marrieds are not more likely to expect a birth within two years of marriage. Thus, while second-marriers make judgements about additional fertility in a similar fashion to first-marriers, they are more likely to end up having a child, suggesting considerable psychological uncertainty in the context within which they are making these decisions.
Bibliography Citation
Haurin, R. Jean. Determinants of Fertility in Remarriage: An Analysis of White American Experience. Ph.D. Dissertation, The Ohio State University, 1992.
16. Haurin, R. Jean
Determinants of Fertility in Remarriage: Outcomes of White American Experience
Presented: Miami, FL, Population Association of America Meetings, May 1994
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Childbearing; Family Structure; Fertility; First Birth; Household Composition; Remarriage

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study examines how remarriage influences the timing of first births in marriage for a contemporary cohort of white females. A model of the determinants of a first birth in marriage is developed and empirically tested for first and second marriage. Hypotheses regarding the impact of prior marital experience and characteristics of prior-born children for both wife and husband are tested. Correction is made for the process of selection into various marital states. Results indicate that first- and second marriers are influenced by similar sets of factors. However, second-married individuals are significantly more likely to have a birth soon after marriage. These results highlight the pro-fertility context of remarriage suggesting a desire to "cement" new marriages through additional fertility. Larger numbers of prior-born children residing outside the household tend to decrease the likelihood of subsequent fertility. The overall reduction in fertility is greatest if the prior- born children are the woman's step-children rather than biological children.
Bibliography Citation
Haurin, R. Jean. "Determinants of Fertility in Remarriage: Outcomes of White American Experience." Presented: Miami, FL, Population Association of America Meetings, May 1994.
17. Haurin, R. Jean
Marriage and Childbearing of Adults: An Evaluation of the 1992 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth
Report, NICHD. Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, November 1994
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): Childbearing; Cohabitation; Data Quality/Consistency; Ethnic Differences; Fertility; Gender Differences; Marital Dissolution; Marital Status; Marriage; Racial Differences

This report provides a descriptive overview of the 1992 marriage and childbearing data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth and evaluates data quality based on comparisons to external data sources. Greater emphasis than in previous reports, is placed on reviewing the NLSY marital history and cohabitation data and on examining previously known problem areas such as the recording of birth history information for men. Results reveal extraordinary comparability of the NLSY data to estimates derived from alternative national data sources. These include cross-sectional estimates by marital status and cohabitation status, overall levels of completed and expected fertility, and the timing of marriage and fertility. Typical patterns by gender and race/ethnicity are confirmed for selected marital and fertility comparisons.
Bibliography Citation
Haurin, R. Jean. "Marriage and Childbearing of Adults: An Evaluation of the 1992 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth." Report, NICHD. Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, November 1994.
18. Haurin, R. Jean
Patterns of Childhood Residence and the Relationship to Young Adult Outcomes
Journal of Marriage and Family 54,4 (November 1992): 846-880.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/353166
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: National Council on Family Relations
Keyword(s): Childhood Residence; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Family Structure; Parental Influences; Racial Differences

This study describes the childhood residence patterns of a national cohort of youth and analyses the effects of expanded measures of family structure on a variety of young adult outcomes. Results reveal major variability in residence patterns by race and ethnicity across a wide array of living arrangements and from birth through age eighteen. Family stress and socialization perspectives are used to examine the effect of summary measures of family structure across childhood on the likelihood of high school completion, teen parenting, delinquency, drug and alcohol use and later marital disruption. Results of logistic regressions indicate that white youth benefit significantly from the presence of two parents. Controlling for a variety of social and economic background factors, duration in mother-only families shows no significant consequences for these outcomes while residence with a step-parent has negative consequences for several outcomes across subgroups.
Bibliography Citation
Haurin, R. Jean. "Patterns of Childhood Residence and the Relationship to Young Adult Outcomes." Journal of Marriage and Family 54,4 (November 1992): 846-880.
19. Haurin, R. Jean
Mott, Frank L.
Adolescent Sexual Activity in the Family Context: The Impact of Older Siblings
Demography 27,4 (November 1990): 537-557.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/e283316w36q50577/
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Age at First Intercourse; Family Resources; Pairs (also see Siblings); Racial Differences; Sexual Activity; Sexual Behavior; Sexual Experiences/Virginity; Siblings

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using approximately 2,000 sibling pairs from the NLSY, this study examines the influence of an older sibling's age at first sexual intercourse upon the sexual initiation of a younger sibling. Hypotheses about differences by gender- composition of the pair are tested using a framework derived from social comparison theory and a two-stage failure-time model. Results provide evidence of a direct, but modest sized older sibling effect for white, but not black youth. This effect is approximately equal in magnitude for same- and opposite-sex siblings. Little support is offered for the greater salience and association of sexual activity for brother-brother as compared to sister-sister pairs.
Bibliography Citation
Haurin, R. Jean and Frank L. Mott. "Adolescent Sexual Activity in the Family Context: The Impact of Older Siblings." Demography 27,4 (November 1990): 537-557.
20. Haurin, R. Jean
Mott, Frank L.
Adolescent Sexual Activity in the Family Context: The Impact of Older Siblings
Report, Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, October 1989
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): Age at First Intercourse; Family Resources; Pairs (also see Siblings); Racial Differences; Sexual Activity; Sexual Behavior; Sexual Experiences/Virginity; Siblings

Using approximately 2,000 sibling pairs from the NLSY, this report examines the influence of an older sibling's age at first sexual intercourse upon the sexual initiation of a younger sibling.
Bibliography Citation
Haurin, R. Jean and Frank L. Mott. "Adolescent Sexual Activity in the Family Context: The Impact of Older Siblings." Report, Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, October 1989.
21. Haurin, R. Jean
Mott, Frank L.
Social Policy and Demographic Change: Trends in Survival for U.S. Males in the Years Preceding Retirement, 1966-1981
Report, Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1987
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): Health Care; Health Factors; Legislation; Retirement; Social Security

Using data from the NLS of Older Men (1966-1981), this paper examines the extent to which survival prospects for men in the years immediately preceding the normal retirement age have been affected by the many changes in medical and health care and in Social Security retirement and disability provisions during the period. Hypotheses relating both to generalized improvements in survival probabilities and to the narrowing of survival differentials between population subgroups defined by socioeconomic, marital, health and employment status are tested. Results indicate that many of the traditionally evidenced differentials narrow or vanish over the period. Consistent with expectations, the greatest improvement in survival is evidenced for the retired, particularly those with health problems. The selective improvement in survival chances for this group is related to ongoing transitions in medical and health care as well as retirement trends in general.
Bibliography Citation
Haurin, R. Jean and Frank L. Mott. "Social Policy and Demographic Change: Trends in Survival for U.S. Males in the Years Preceding Retirement, 1966-1981." Report, Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1987.
22. Mott, Frank L.
Baker, Paula C.
Haurin, R. Jean
Marsiglio, William
Fertility Related Data in the 1982 National Longitudinal Survey of Work Experience of Youth: An Evaluation of Data Quality and Some Preliminary Analytical Results
Report, Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1983
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): Abortion; Behavior; Birth Rate; Child Care; Contraception; Deviance; Fertility; Male Sample; Methods/Methodology; Sexual Activity; Sexual Behavior; Wantedness

This report evaluates the quality of the fertility-related data in the 1982 round of the NLSY and summarizes highlights of findings from these fertility data. The evaluation indicates that the overall quality of the female live birth information is equivalent to that of the Current Population Survey, that the abortion data is significantly under-reported, and that the other fertility-related information appears equivalent in quality to that of other available data. The quality of the male birth records are inferior to those of the female respondents and should be used with greater care by fertility researchers using this data set. The report specifies the potential magnitude of reporting errors, how these potential error levels are related to characteristics of the respondents, and the procedures used to clean up the fertility records. The analytical sections of the report examine differentials in period and cohort birth rates, sexual activity and contraception, birth wantedness, and pregnancy outcomes for selected respondent characteristics within cross-tabular and multivariate frameworks. Characteristics considered include race and ethnicity, religion, education, and various aspects of family stability, social class, and geographic residence. The multivariate results suggest the utility of a variety of background factors and more proximate respondent attitudes and behaviors for investigating a variety of adolescent and young adult fertility-related attitudes and behavior.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L., Paula C. Baker, R. Jean Haurin and William Marsiglio. "Fertility Related Data in the 1982 National Longitudinal Survey of Work Experience of Youth: An Evaluation of Data Quality and Some Preliminary Analytical Results." Report, Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1983.
23. Mott, Frank L.
Haurin, R. Jean
Being an Only Child: Effects on Educational Progression and Career Orientation
Journal of Family Issues 3,4 (December 1982): 575-593.
Also: http://jfi.sagepub.com/content/3/4/575.abstract
Cohort(s): Young Men, Young Women
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Behavior; Career Patterns; Children; Educational Attainment; Family Influences; I.Q.; Marriage; Pairs (also see Siblings); Siblings

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study uses data from the Young Men's and Young Women's cohorts of the NLS to measure the independent effects of sibling number and placement on a number of educational, family, career, and social-psychological outcomes as of age 24. In particular, the study compares separately for young men and women the effects of being an only child with being the older of two children as well as the general importance of coming from a smaller rather than a larger family. The authors conclude that, while confluence theory is frequently supported by the data for both sexes, the corollary tutoring hypothesis is generally only validated for young women. The authors conjecture that this sex discrepancy may reflect a greater likelihood that the tutoring role within the family may be substantially affectively based, thus making it an activity that is more likely to be associated with female intrafamily role behavior.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L. and R. Jean Haurin. "Being an Only Child: Effects on Educational Progression and Career Orientation." Journal of Family Issues 3,4 (December 1982): 575-593.
24. Mott, Frank L.
Haurin, R. Jean
Factors Affecting Mortality in the Years Surrounding Retirement
In: Retirement Among American Men. H.S. Parnes, ed. Lexington, MA: Lexington Books, 1985
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: Jossey-Bass
Keyword(s): Age and Ageing; Educational Attainment; Employment; Health Care; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Marital Status; Mortality; Occupational Status; Racial Differences; Retirement

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This article presents an analysis of the mortality rates of older men and shows to what extent factors such as race, education and marital status are independent predictors of mortality. Black men have systematically higher mortality than whites, but almost all of this difference reflects differences in socioeconomic background. In contrast, the effect of marital status appears more deeply embedded. After controlling for background factors as well as for differences between the married and non-married in employment and health status, married men still face more favorable survival prospects. Detailed employment measures as well as self-report health measures permit (1) documentation of the health-mortality association and (2) more effective measurement of other mortality differentials. The generally acknowledged overall declines in mortality over the past fifteen years have affected all segments of the society; blacks and whites, the well- and the poorly educated, and the healthy and unhealthy, have all apparently benefited from the general improvements in health and medical care services available in our society. One population subgroup, however, has benefited to a substantially greater extent than others-- individuals not at work who frequently have reported illnesses of long duration. In this regard, it may be fair to conclude that those most in need have indeed benefited the most from the secular improvements in health care.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L. and R. Jean Haurin. "Factors Affecting Mortality in the Years Surrounding Retirement" In: Retirement Among American Men. H.S. Parnes, ed. Lexington, MA: Lexington Books, 1985
25. Mott, Frank L.
Haurin, R. Jean
Inter-Relatedness of Age at First Intercourse, Early Pregnancy, Alcohol, and Drug Use Among American Adolescents
Report, Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1987
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Adolescent Fertility; Age at First Intercourse; Alcohol Use; Behavioral Problems; Childbearing; Deviance; Fertility; Gender Differences; Sexual Activity; Sexual Behavior; Substance Use

This research describes the patterns of initiation into drugs, alcohol, and early sexual activity for a cohort of young men and women reaching maturity in the late 1970s and early 1980s. Preliminary results indicate that while substantial proportions of youth have used marijuana prior to their 16th birthday, much smaller proportions have tried harder substances, with males generally showing higher rates of initiation at all ages than females. Comparisons with alcohol use highlight the sensitivity of initiation patterns to the definition of substance usage employed. Multivariate results suggest a variety of significant independent linkages between family background factors and these early adolescent behaviors. The direction of effects is generally consistent across the alcohol, marijuana, and other drug-use outcomes. Where divergences occur, they tend to emphasize the different influences on early sexual activity as compared to early substance use. Early use of alcohol and m arijuana are also shown to have significant associations with early sexual activity for all race/gender groups independent of family background factors.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L. and R. Jean Haurin. "Inter-Relatedness of Age at First Intercourse, Early Pregnancy, Alcohol, and Drug Use Among American Adolescents." Report, Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1987.
26. Mott, Frank L.
Haurin, R. Jean
Linkages Between Sexual Activity and Alcohol and Drug Use Among American Adolescents
Family Planning Perspectives 20,3 (May-June 1988): 128-136.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2135701
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Alan Guttmacher Institute
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Alcohol Use; Behavioral Problems; Deviance; Drug Use; Fertility; Gender Differences; Sexual Activity; Sexual Behavior

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This research describes the patterns of initiation into drug and alcohol use, and early sexual activity for a cohort of young men and women reaching maturity in the late 1970s and early 1980s. Results indicate that while substantial proportions of youth have used marijuana prior to their 16th birthday, much smaller proportions have tried harder substances or experienced sexual intercourse, with males generally showing higher rates of initiation at all ages than females. Comparisons between various levels of alcohol use highlight the sensitivity of initiation patterns to the definition of substance usage employed. This research emphasizes the general nonparticipation or singularity of participation in these adolescent behaviors, with only modest percentages of youth experiencing multiple events at early ages or in proximity to one another. However, for those youth who do use one or more substances at a given age, the likelihood is greater that they will soon become sexually active. While the converse is also true, it is more so for girls than boys, suggesting stronger linkages among these activities for females.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L. and R. Jean Haurin. "Linkages Between Sexual Activity and Alcohol and Drug Use Among American Adolescents." Family Planning Perspectives 20,3 (May-June 1988): 128-136.
27. Mott, Frank L.
Haurin, R. Jean
Longer Term Determinants of Male Mortality in the Years Surrounding Retirement
Presented: Minneapolis, MN, Population Association of America Meetings, 1984
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Age and Ageing; Health Care; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Mortality; Retirement; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Data from the Older Men's cohort are used to examine the extent to which background as well as more proximate factors are determinants of mortality over the period from 1966 to 1981 for a nationally representative sample of men who were 45 to 59 years of age in 1966. Included is a cohort trend analysis that gives special attention to the group of men who were ages 55 to 59 in 1966 because this group can be followed through the retirement years; by 1981, its surviving members had attained ages 70-74. The study documents how the generally acknowledged overall decline in mortality over the past 15 years has impacted fairly equally on all segments of the society. The only population subgroup that has benefited to a substantially greater extent than others is that group which includes the most obviously at risk individuals not at work who frequently report illnesses of long duration. Thus, it is reasonable to conclude that those most in need have benefited most from the secular improvements in health care.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L. and R. Jean Haurin. "Longer Term Determinants of Male Mortality in the Years Surrounding Retirement." Presented: Minneapolis, MN, Population Association of America Meetings, 1984.
28. Mott, Frank L.
Haurin, R. Jean
The Impact of Health Problems and Mortality on Family Well-Being
In: Work and Retirement: A Longitudinal Study of Men. H.S. Parnes, ed. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1981.
Also: http://www.chipublib.org/search/details/cn/676493
Cohort(s): Mature Women, Older Men
Publisher: MIT Press
Keyword(s): Behavior; Employment; Family Income; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Husbands; Mortality; Racial Differences; Retirement; Widows; Wives

About one-fifth of the more than 20 million males in the U.S. civilian population who were between 45 and 64 years of age in 1976 will not survive to age 65 and the majority of these men will leave widows when they die. These statistics are reflected in the Older Men's sample of the NLS. Of the approximately 5,000 individuals in the original sample, 737 men had died by the time of the 1976 survey before reaching 65. The longitudinal records permit a comparison of the predeath work experience and income of this group with the experience of comparable men who remained alive in 1976. It is possible in this way to explore the extent to which deteriorating health or disability prior to death affect family income and the labor market activity of other family members. To assess the impact of the death of the breadwinner on survivors, an additional analysis can be made of data from the NLS of Mature Women. The longitudinal records of a somewhat younger sample of women who were widowed between the ages of 30 and 53 are compared with those of a similar group of women whose marriages remained intact. The racial difference in mortality rates is pronounced: the gross mortality rate of black men was one-third again as high as that of whites. The differential persists when educational attainment is controlled but tends to disappear within occupational categories. This suggests that black men of this generation have been channeled into less desirable occupations than white men with ostensibly comparable educational backgrounds. Other topics discussed and compared are: racial group death rates, men with previously reported health problems, income and employment experience of decedents, decendents' employment opportunities, labor force behavior of decendents.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L. and R. Jean Haurin. "The Impact of Health Problems and Mortality on Family Well-Being" In: Work and Retirement: A Longitudinal Study of Men. H.S. Parnes, ed. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1981.
29. Mott, Frank L.
Haurin, R. Jean
Variations in the Educational and Career Development Paths of Brothers and Sisters
In: Employment Revolution, Young American Women in the 1970s. F.L. Mott, ed. Cambridge MA: MIT Press, 1982.
Cohort(s): Young Men, Young Women
Publisher: MIT Press
Keyword(s): Career Patterns; Education; Educational Attainment; Family Resources; Pairs (also see Siblings); Parental Influences; Siblings

This study examines the extent to which socioeconomic and internal characteristics of families differentially affect the ability of matched pairs of brothers and sisters to progress through the educational system. The data utilized came from the NLS of Young Men and Women. It was found that young men were apparently advantaged in their educational progress compared with young women. Sibling position or sex of other siblings had little, if any, influence. The extent of parental education did have a major effect, and the educational progress probabilities for sons were higher than those for daughters, regardless of the parents' education. Greater ability for boys and girls was associated with higher probabilities of education completion. Parental encouragement affected the ability of youth to succeed.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L. and R. Jean Haurin. "Variations in the Educational and Career Development Paths of Brothers and Sisters" In: Employment Revolution, Young American Women in the 1970s. F.L. Mott, ed. Cambridge MA: MIT Press, 1982.
30. Mott, Frank L.
Haurin, R. Jean
Marsiglio, William
The Impact of Longitudinal Data Files on Research on Women's Roles
Presented: Detroit, MI, American Sociological Association Annual Meetings, 1983
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Behavior; Research Methodology; Sex Roles

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper considers how several major longitudinal data sets which include data appropriate for sociological analyses of issues associated with women's roles have been used for such research. In particular, the extent to which these data sets are (1) useful for examining the dynamics of female home/work behavior and (2) being used extensively within a longitudinal context. The explicit inclusion of variables for sociological analyses in these data sets and the extent to which the available data have biased the research orientation of sociologists is considered.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L., R. Jean Haurin and William Marsiglio. "The Impact of Longitudinal Data Files on Research on Women's Roles." Presented: Detroit, MI, American Sociological Association Annual Meetings, 1983.
31. Mott, Frank L.
Haurin, R. Jean
Shaw, Lois B.
Statham, Anne
Years for Decision, Volume 5: A Longitudinal Study of the Educational, Labor Market and Family Experiences of Young Women, 1968-1978
Washington DC: National Technical Information Service, 1981
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: National Technical Information Service (NTIS)
Keyword(s): Career Patterns; Educational Attainment; Fertility; Marital Disruption; Sex Roles; Siblings; Work Attitudes; Work History

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This report uses data from the NLS of Young Women to examine trends and determinants of employment between 1968 and 1978 for women who were 14 to 24 years of age in 1968. The study highlights the importance of non-economic factors as motivators of employment for young women and the relative independence of work and fertility for young women now reaching adulthood. The study also contrasts the educational progression paths of young men and women, documents the association between divorce, remarriage and economic wellbeing for young women, and describes recent trends in their marital, childbearing, schooling and employment patterns and the association between those phenomena. This volume has been published by MIT Press entitled The Employment Revolution: Young American Women of the 1970s, Frank L. Mott, ed.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L., R. Jean Haurin, Lois B. Shaw and Anne Statham. Years for Decision, Volume 5: A Longitudinal Study of the Educational, Labor Market and Family Experiences of Young Women, 1968-1978. Washington DC: National Technical Information Service, 1981.
32. Parnes, Herbert S.
Crowley, Joan E.
Haurin, R. Jean
Less, Lawrence L.
Retirement Among American Men
Report, Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1984
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): Early Retirement; Earnings; Education; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Job Satisfaction; Life Satisfaction; Retirement

Published as: Retirement Among American Men, Lexington MA: Lexington Books, 1985. This is also the six volume of a series.
Bibliography Citation
Parnes, Herbert S., Joan E. Crowley, R. Jean Haurin and Lawrence L. Less. Retirement Among American Men. Report, Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1984.
33. Parnes, Herbert S.
Crowley, Joan E.
Haurin, R. Jean
Less, Lawrence L.
Mott, Frank L.
Morgan, William R.
Nestel, Gilbert
Retirement Among American Men
Lexington, MA: Lexington Books, 1985
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: Jossey-Bass
Keyword(s): Early Retirement; Earnings; Education; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Job Satisfaction; Life Satisfaction; Mortality; Retirees; Retirement

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Fifteen years of data from a nationally representative sample of men age 45-59 in 1966 show that by 1981 most had retired. One third of all retirements and almost half of those by black men were caused by poor health; fewer than five percent of retirees were forced from their jobs by mandatory plans; about 10 percent of retirees were forced from their jobs by mandatory plans; about 10 percent left the labor market in discouragement due to labor market adversity. Most retirements, however, are voluntary, and most take place before age 65. Trends in mortality differentials show that general improvements in health and medical care have benefited all groups, especially the chronically ill. The data highlight a trend toward early retirement in the 1960s and 1970s and show that only 30 percent of retirements actually took place at the age men expected when asked at age 59. Economic well being, leisure activities and social interactions, psychological and physical well being are examined. The experience of the minority who continue to work beyond the normal retirement age is also analyzed.

Introduction and overview / Herbert S. Parnes and Lawrence J. Less -- Factors affecting mortality in the years surrounding retirement / Frank L. Mott and R. Jean Haurin -- The volume and pattern of retirements, 1966-1981 / Herbert S. Parnes and Lawrence J. Less -- Retirement expectation and the timing of retirement / Gilbert Nestel -- Economic well-being in retirement / Herbert S. Parnes and Lawrence J. Less -- Leisure activities and social networks / William R. Morgan, Herbert S. Parnes, and Lawrence J. Less -- Longitudinal effects of retirement on men's psychological and physical well-being / Joan E. Crowley -- Shunning retirement : the experience of full-time workers / Herbert S. Parnes and Lawrence J. Less.

Bibliography Citation
Parnes, Herbert S., Joan E. Crowley, R. Jean Haurin, Lawrence L. Less, Frank L. Mott, William R. Morgan and Gilbert Nestel. Retirement Among American Men. Lexington, MA: Lexington Books, 1985.