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Author: Macke, Anne Statham
Resulting in 6 citations.
1. Macke, Anne Statham
Changing Family Roles as Predictors of Labor Force Behaviors
Presented: Cincinnati, OH, Meetings of the North Central Sociological Association, May 1978
Cohort(s): Mature Women, Older Men, Young Men, Young Women
Publisher: North Central Sociological Association ==> Routledge (new in 2012)
Keyword(s): Attitudes; Family Constraints; Family Influences; Mobility, Job

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Data from the four age/sex groups in the NLS were analyzed to examine the impact of family role attitudes on labor force behaviors. Nontraditional men and traditional women, being relatively free of family support responsibility, were expected to exhibit more flexibility in their labor force behaviors. They were expected to change employers more frequently, to do so for personal gain or satisfaction, to feel less constrained by the family's economic needs. The findings partially support the hypothesis, but show the greatest similarity between nontraditional men and nontraditional women. These nontraditional persons change employers more often, do so for personal gain or satisfaction, but are actually more constrained by the family's support situation. This combination of flexibility and constraint represents joint support responsibility. By closely monitoring the family's situation, each partner can provide security to the other during risky transitions, in the end allowing for more flexibility and ultimate job success. Evidence of this pattern was found in all age and race groups, along with some evidence that the prevalence of this pattern is increasing over time.
Bibliography Citation
Macke, Anne Statham. "Changing Family Roles as Predictors of Labor Force Behaviors." Presented: Cincinnati, OH, Meetings of the North Central Sociological Association, May 1978.
2. Macke, Anne Statham
Family Role Definitions as Determinants of Labor Force Behavior
Ph.D. Dissertation, Indiana University, 1976
Cohort(s): Mature Women, Young Women
Publisher: UMI - University Microfilms, Bell and Howell Information and Learning
Keyword(s): Assets; Behavioral Differences; Family Income; Family Influences; Husbands, Influence; Sex Roles

The extent to which a shift in support responsibility causes behavioral differences for traditional and nontraditional married persons is the central consideration of the study. An expected repercussion of shifting support responsibility is that husbands and wives who are relatively free of family support responsibility (nontraditional men and traditional women) should be less constrained to stay in their present jobs by the family's financial situation (assets, number of dependents, etc. ) and more likely to leave their jobs in response to personal preferences (extrinsic and intrinsic job satisfaction) than traditional men and nontraditional women. In general, true reciprocal role modification for men and women is not apparent. While true role modification (in the form of shifting support responsibility) has apparently occurred for a certain segment of our society, the modification of role definitions (nontraditionality) is the crucial factor producing alterations in role behavior (differing reactions to constraints upon labor force behavior). The simple fact that a wife works--in and of itself--is not sufficient to produce these behavioral changes. Specific aspects of our findings substantiate two important principles of the symbolic interactionist approach: (1) the power of Thomas' subjective "definition of the situation" is seen in the important influence role definitions have in determining the role behavior of working wives and their husbands; and (2) the constraining power of one's social environment is shown by the fact that certain respondents do not adhere to their role definitions because of overpowering environmental influences.
Bibliography Citation
Macke, Anne Statham. Family Role Definitions as Determinants of Labor Force Behavior. Ph.D. Dissertation, Indiana University, 1976.
3. Macke, Anne Statham
Using the National Longitudinal Surveys to Examine Changes in Women's Role Behavior
Journal of Social Issues 38,1 (Winter 1982): 39-51.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1540-4560.1982.tb00840.x/abstract
Cohort(s): Mature Women, Young Women
Publisher: Plenum Publishing Corporation
Keyword(s): Behavior; Educational Attainment; Family Influences; Research Methodology; Sex Roles; Work History

This paper explores the uses of a particular set of panel data, the NLS of Mature and Young Women, to study women's issues. Women's labor force behaviors, role conceptions, and family statuses were measured at several time points. Various ways of examining the relationships among these variables are presented. The author concludes that the data set provides valuable information about changes in women's situation in society over time and causes of those changes.
Bibliography Citation
Macke, Anne Statham. "Using the National Longitudinal Surveys to Examine Changes in Women's Role Behavior." Journal of Social Issues 38,1 (Winter 1982): 39-51.
4. Macke, Anne Statham
Hudis, Paula M.
Larrick, Don
Sex-Role Attitudes and Employment Among Women: Dynamic Models of Continuity and Change
In: Women's Changing Roles at Home and on the Job: National Commission for Manpower Policy, Special Report No: 26. Washington DC: U.S. GPO, 1978
Cohort(s): Mature Women, Young Women
Publisher: U.S. Government Printing Office
Keyword(s): Employment; Husbands, Influence; Sex Roles; Teenagers; Vocational Education; Work Attitudes; Work History

The authors explore the hypothesis that prior sex-role attitudes among women influence subsequent labor force behavior, which, in turn, affects later sex-role attitudes. They find that recent declines in sex-role traditionality among American women are likely to accelerate the desire for employment among whites, but that among blacks, attitudinal changes appear not to affect the future employment of current adult cohorts. For black adolescents entering the labor force, however, early market work will be important predictors of their future desire for work. Husbands' attitudes toward women's involvement in the labor market, particularly among whites, were also significant. Based on these and other findings, the authors present five public policy recommendations.
Bibliography Citation
Macke, Anne Statham, Paula M. Hudis and Don Larrick. "Sex-Role Attitudes and Employment Among Women: Dynamic Models of Continuity and Change" In: Women's Changing Roles at Home and on the Job: National Commission for Manpower Policy, Special Report No: 26. Washington DC: U.S. GPO, 1978
5. Macke, Anne Statham
Hudis, Paula M.
Larrick, Don
Sex-Role Attitudes and Employment Among Women: A Dynamic Model of Change and Continuity
Report, Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, October 1979
Cohort(s): Mature Women, Young Women
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): Employment; Gender Attitudes/Roles; Husbands, Influence; Labor Force Participation; Sex Roles; Work Attitudes

Our analyses demonstrate a small but significant effect of nontraditional attitudes on white wives' extent of employment experience and a substantially larger effect of market participation on later attitudes.
Bibliography Citation
Macke, Anne Statham, Paula M. Hudis and Don Larrick. "Sex-Role Attitudes and Employment Among Women: A Dynamic Model of Change and Continuity." Report, Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, October 1979.
6. Macke, Anne Statham
Mott, Frank L.
The Impact of Maternal Characteristics and Significant Life Events on the Work Orientation of Adolescent Women: A Longitudinal Look
Research in Labor Economics 3 (1980): 129-146
Cohort(s): Mature Women, Young Women
Publisher: JAI Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Children; Employment; High School; Marriage; Mothers and Daughters; Pairs (also see Siblings); Work Attitudes

A mother-daughter sample from the NLS of Mature and Young Women cohorts is used to examine important determinants of work orientation among adolescent women. The impact of maternal characteristics and other key life experiences is examined for adolescent women when they are in high school and again when they are college-aged and beyond. Findings show the importance of maternal influence, the college experience, the current family experiences (getting married, having a child). Implications for future trends in women's labor force participation, including continued racial differences, are discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Macke, Anne Statham and Frank L. Mott. "The Impact of Maternal Characteristics and Significant Life Events on the Work Orientation of Adolescent Women: A Longitudinal Look." Research in Labor Economics 3 (1980): 129-146.