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Author: Chase-Lansdale, P. Lindsay
Resulting in 15 citations.
1. Chase-Lansdale, P. Lindsay
Impact of Early Maternal Employment on Children's Development: Insights from a National U.S. Sample
Presented: Lausanne, Switzerland, International Symposium on Childcare in the Early Years: Research and Future Prospects, 1990
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: International Symposium on Childcare
Keyword(s): Child Development; Children; General Assessment; Maternal Employment; Mothers

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Bibliography Citation
Chase-Lansdale, P. Lindsay. "Impact of Early Maternal Employment on Children's Development: Insights from a National U.S. Sample." Presented: Lausanne, Switzerland, International Symposium on Childcare in the Early Years: Research and Future Prospects, 1990.
2. Chase-Lansdale, P. Lindsay
Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne
Escape from Poverty: What Makes a Difference for Children?
Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 1995
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Keyword(s): Child Care; Children, Well-Being; Family Studies; Fathers; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Overview, Child Assessment Data; Poverty; Racial Differences; Welfare; Women's Roles

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

First published: 1995. Includes bibliographical references and index. Whose responsibility? An historical analysis of the changing roles of mothers, fathers, and society -- The life circumstances and development of children in welfare families: a profile based on national survey data -- Welfare- to-work through the eyes of children -- Strategies for altering the outcomes of poor children and their families -- Policy issues of child care -- Child care and children of color -- Health policy in the Family Support Act of 1988 -- Economic issues of health care -- Dealing with dads: the changing roles of fathers -- The effects of child support reform on child well-being -- Losing ground or moving ahead? Welfare reform and children -- National surveys as data resources for public policy research on poor children -- An interdisciplinary model and data requirements for studying poor children -- Two-generation programs: a new intervention strategy and directions for future research .
Bibliography Citation
Chase-Lansdale, P. Lindsay and Jeanne Brooks-Gunn. Escape from Poverty: What Makes a Difference for Children? Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 1995.
3. Chase-Lansdale, P. Lindsay
Gordon, Rachel A.
Economic Hardship and the Development of Five- and Six-Year-Olds: Neighborhood and Regional Perspectives
Child Development 67,6 (December 1996): 3338-3367.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1467-8624.1996.tb01917.x/abstract
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Child Development; Childhood Education, Early; Children, School-Age; Cognitive Development; Education; Ethnic Studies; Family Influences; Geocoded Data; Income; Neighborhood Effects; Occupations; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT); Racial Differences; Racial Studies; Regions; Socioeconomic Factors; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

The present study examines the association between neighborhood characteristics and the development of 5- and 6-year-olds. We also explore how region might moderate the effects of neighborhoods on children, thus considering both larger (regional) and smaller (community) contexts of families. We find that structural aspects of the neighborhood at the census tract level are associated with child development in the early school-age period. For the sample as a whole neighborhood factors play a role in both cognitive and socioemotional outcomes, even when family factors are controlled. Yet only modest support for neighborhood influences on child development is evident in our main effects models. It appears that neighborhood influences on child development are underestimated or masked unless the associations are examined separately by two areas of the United States: the Midwest and Northeast versus the South and West. Significant associations between neighborhood variables and children's development are seen in the Northeastern and Midwestern regions, but less so in the Southern and Western regions of the United States. Greater economic and social resources as measured by average neighborhood SES (income, education, occupation) and greater ethnic congruity as measured by more neighbors of the same racial heritage as the child are related to higher cognitive functioning, but only in the Northeast and Midwest. Furthermore, children in these regions show more competent behavioral functioning when the relative presence of adults to children in the neighborhood is higher. In these regions, African-American but not white children show higher levels of behavior problems when community male joblessness rates are higher. We speculate about processes that might underlie these neighborhood and regional effects and point to directions for further research. (Copyright 1996 by the Society for Research in Child Development. All rights reserved.)
Bibliography Citation
Chase-Lansdale, P. Lindsay and Rachel A. Gordon. "Economic Hardship and the Development of Five- and Six-Year-Olds: Neighborhood and Regional Perspectives." Child Development 67,6 (December 1996): 3338-3367.
4. Chase-Lansdale, P. Lindsay
Gordon, Rachel A.
Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne
Klebanov, Pamela Kato
Neighborhood and Family Influences on the Intellectual and Behavioral Competence of Preschool and Early School-Age Children
In: Neighborhood Poverty: Context and Consequences for Children, Volume 1. G. Duncan, J. Brooks-Gunn, and J. Aber, eds., New York, NY: Russell Sage Foundation; 1997: 79-118
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Russell Sage Foundation
Keyword(s): Age at Birth; Children, Academic Development; Children, Poverty; Children, Preschool; Children, School-Age; Cognitive Ability; Family Income; Family Resources; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Infant Health and Development Program (IHDP); Maternal Employment; Neighborhood Effects; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT)

Chapter 4: In this chapter we examine neighborhood-and family-level effects on the functioning of preschool (three- and four-year-old) and early school-age (five- and six-year-old) children. We use data from the Children of the NLSY, a survey of children based on a national survey of adolescents and young adults begun in 1979, and from the IHDP, a large eight-site study of an early educational intervention for premature and low-birth-weight children and their parents.
Bibliography Citation
Chase-Lansdale, P. Lindsay, Rachel A. Gordon, Jeanne Brooks-Gunn and Pamela Kato Klebanov. "Neighborhood and Family Influences on the Intellectual and Behavioral Competence of Preschool and Early School-Age Children" In: Neighborhood Poverty: Context and Consequences for Children, Volume 1. G. Duncan, J. Brooks-Gunn, and J. Aber, eds., New York, NY: Russell Sage Foundation; 1997: 79-118
5. Chase-Lansdale, P. Lindsay
Michael, Robert T.
Desai, Sonalde
Impact of Early Maternal Employment on Children's Development: The Role of the Home Environment
Working Paper, Department of Educational Seminar Series, The University of Chicago, June 1991
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: University of Chicago
Keyword(s): Child Development; Home Environment; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Maternal Employment; Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Bibliography Citation
Chase-Lansdale, P. Lindsay, Robert T. Michael and Sonalde Desai. "Impact of Early Maternal Employment on Children's Development: The Role of the Home Environment." Working Paper, Department of Educational Seminar Series, The University of Chicago, June 1991.
6. Chase-Lansdale, P. Lindsay
Michael, Robert T.
Desai, Sonalde
Maternal Employment During Infancy: An Analysis of "Children of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY)"
In: Employed Mothers and their Children. J.V. Lerner and N.L. Galambos, eds. New York, NY: Garland Publishing, 1991
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Garland Publishing, Inc.
Keyword(s): Children; Employment; General Assessment; Maternal Employment; Mothers; Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT); Women

Permission to reprint the abstract has been denied by the publisher.

Bibliography Citation
Chase-Lansdale, P. Lindsay, Robert T. Michael and Sonalde Desai. "Maternal Employment During Infancy: An Analysis of "Children of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY)"" In: Employed Mothers and their Children. J.V. Lerner and N.L. Galambos, eds. New York, NY: Garland Publishing, 1991
7. Chase-Lansdale, P. Lindsay
Mott, Frank L.
Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne
Phillips, Deborah A.
Children of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY): A Unique Research Opportunity
Developmental Psychology 27,6 (November 1991): 918-931.
Also: http://psycnet.apa.org/journals/dev/27/6/918/
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLS General, NLSY79
Publisher: American Psychological Association (APA)
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Child Care; Children; General Assessment; Household Composition; Life Course; Maternal Employment; Mothers; NLS Description; Overview, Child Assessment Data; Research Methodology

The data set known as Children of the NLSY offers unusual opportunities for research on questions not easily pursued by developmental psychologists. This article provides a history of children of the NLSY, describes the data set with special focus on the child outcome measures and a subset of maternal life history measures, highlights several of the research and policy relevant issues that may be addressed, and shows how the intersection of children's and mother's lives may be studied in less static, more life-course oriented ways. Exemplars are given in the topics of maternal employment and child care, adolescent pregnancy and child rearing, divorce, poverty, and multigenerational parenting. Implications of research using children of the NLSY for the field of developmental psychology and interdisciplinary collaboration are discussed. [PsycINFO]
Bibliography Citation
Chase-Lansdale, P. Lindsay, Frank L. Mott, Jeanne Brooks-Gunn and Deborah A. Phillips. "Children of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY): A Unique Research Opportunity." Developmental Psychology 27,6 (November 1991): 918-931.
8. Desai, Sonalde
Chase-Lansdale, P. Lindsay
Mother or Market? Effects of Maternal Employment on the Intellectual Ability of 4-Year-Old Children
Presented: New Orleans, LA, Population Association of America Meetings, April 1988
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Child Care; Child Development; Children; Employment; Family Income; Gender Differences; General Assessment; Maternal Employment; Mothers; Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Bibliography Citation
Desai, Sonalde and P. Lindsay Chase-Lansdale. "Mother or Market? Effects of Maternal Employment on the Intellectual Ability of 4-Year-Old Children." Presented: New Orleans, LA, Population Association of America Meetings, April 1988.
9. Desai, Sonalde
Chase-Lansdale, P. Lindsay
Michael, Robert T.
Mother or Market? Effects of Maternal Employment on Cognitive Development of Four-Year-Old Children
Demography 26,4 (November 1989): 545-561.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/k612587ln0x288n4/
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Child Care; Child Development; Children; Employment; Family Income; Gender Differences; General Assessment; Maternal Employment; Mothers; Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT); Test Scores/Test theory/IRT

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper is a first report on a project investigating the influence of maternal employment on the cognitive and social development of young children. The data set analyzed is the newly available "Children of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth," a 1986 survey of the 5,000 biological offspring of the females in the NLSY data set. The paper focuses on the cognitive development of the four-year-old children, of whom there are 585. Demographic, economic, and social background factors are controlled in the analysis of relationships among maternal employment, child care, and the child's test score on the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT).
Bibliography Citation
Desai, Sonalde, P. Lindsay Chase-Lansdale and Robert T. Michael. "Mother or Market? Effects of Maternal Employment on Cognitive Development of Four-Year-Old Children." Demography 26,4 (November 1989): 545-561.
10. Desai, Sonalde
Michael, Robert T.
Chase-Lansdale, P. Lindsay
Exploring the Mechanisms through which Employment Affects Women's Childrearing Practices
Presented: Toronto, Canada, Population Association of America Meetings, May 1990
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Child Care; Child Development; Childbearing; Children; General Assessment; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Household Composition; Maternal Employment; Mothers

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using data from the Children of the NLSY, this paper examines the effect of employment on emotional support and cognitive stimulation provided by mothers to their preschool age children. Measures of childrearing practices are based on mother reports as well as interviewer observations, from a short form of HOME [Home Observation for Measurement of the Environment]. The results suggest that mother's cognitive stimulation of the children seems to suffer substantially when the mother is employed, but only in the households with middle or higher levels of income. Moreover and conversely, mother's emotional support of children appears to be greater when the mother is employed, but only in the households with lower levels of income.
Bibliography Citation
Desai, Sonalde, Robert T. Michael and P. Lindsay Chase-Lansdale. "Exploring the Mechanisms through which Employment Affects Women's Childrearing Practices." Presented: Toronto, Canada, Population Association of America Meetings, May 1990.
11. Desai, Sonalde
Michael, Robert T.
Chase-Lansdale, P. Lindsay
Home Environment: A Mechanism through which Maternal Employment Affects Child Development
Working Paper No. 20, The Population Council, New York, 1990
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Child Care; Child Development; Children, Academic Development; Children, Home Environment; Family Income; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Maternal Employment; Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Also: Presented: Toronto, Canada, Population Association of America Meetings, May 1990

This paper argues that seeking a simple, universal effect of maternal employment on the welfare of very young children is not a fruitful strategy. Instead, it suggests that: (1) maternal employment affects children through a variety of mechanisms, some positive and others negative; and (2) the consequences of maternal employment depend on the family's socioeconomic circumstances and the social context. Using data on pre-school aged children in the U.S. from the Children of the NLSY, the paper examines the impact of maternal employment on children's verbal abilities in different family economic contexts. The results indicate that while maternal absence and alternate child care arrangements have some negative impact on children's verbal ability (particularly for boys), in low-income families this negative impact is compensated to a large extent by the positive impact of maternal income and the improved quality of children's home environment which that income can buy.

Bibliography Citation
Desai, Sonalde, Robert T. Michael and P. Lindsay Chase-Lansdale. "Home Environment: A Mechanism through which Maternal Employment Affects Child Development." Working Paper No. 20, The Population Council, New York, 1990.
12. Gordon, Rachel A.
Chase-Lansdale, P. Lindsay
Availability of Child Care in the United States: A Description and Analysis of Data Sources
Working Paper, Department of Sociology and Institute of Government and Public Affairs, University of Illinois at Chicago and Northwestern University, 2000.
Also: http://wf.educ.msu.edu/working_abs.html#0016
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Department of Sociology, University of Illinois at Chicago
Keyword(s): Census of Population; Child Care; Maternal Employment

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Lack of high quality, affordable child care is an oft cited impediment to a maageable work-family balance. This is particularly true given demographic trends toward more dual earner families and employed unmarried parents in the U.S., and given political focus on reducing long term welfare dependency through parents' employment. However, researchers have lacked data about the availability of child care in communities, restricting research on these topics. In this paper, we lay out a conceptual framework regarding the importance of child care availability in a community, considering potential variation based on the urbanicity of the area and the economic resources of its residents. We then describe and evaluate several indicators of child care availability that have been released by the U.S. Census Bureau over the last 15 years. We examine the validity of these data for measuring child care availability using community- and individual-level analyses. We discuss the data sources' benefits and limitations, and point to directions for future data developments and research.
Bibliography Citation
Gordon, Rachel A. and P. Lindsay Chase-Lansdale. "Availability of Child Care in the United States: A Description and Analysis of Data Sources." Working Paper, Department of Sociology and Institute of Government and Public Affairs, University of Illinois at Chicago and Northwestern University, 2000.
13. Gordon, Rachel A.
Chase-Lansdale, P. Lindsay
Availability of Child Care in the United States: A Description and Analysis of Data Sources
Demography 38, 2 (May 2001): 299-316.
Also: http://muse.jhu.edu/login?uri=/journals/demography/v038/38.2gordon.html
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Census of Population; Child Care; Maternal Employment

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Lack of high quality, affordable child care is an oft cited impediment to a maageable work-family balance. This is particularly true given demographic trends toward more dual earner families and employed unmarried parents in the U.S., and given political focus on reducing long term welfare dependency through parents' employment. However, researchers have lacked data about the availability of child care in communities, restricting research on these topics. In this paper, we lay out a conceptual framework regarding the importance of child care availability in a community, considering potential variation based on the urbanicity of the area and the economic resources of its residents. We then describe and evaluate several indicators of child care availability that have been released by the U.S. Census Bureau over the last 15 years. We examine the validity of these data for measuring child care availability using community- and individual-level analyses. We discuss the data sources' benefits and limitations, and point to directions for future data developments and research.
Bibliography Citation
Gordon, Rachel A. and P. Lindsay Chase-Lansdale. "Availability of Child Care in the United States: A Description and Analysis of Data Sources." Demography 38, 2 (May 2001): 299-316.
14. Gordon, Rachel A.
Chase-Lansdale, P. Lindsay
Women's Participation in Market Work and the Availability of Child Care in the United States
Working Paper No. 99-05, NORC and the University of Chicago, 1999
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: National Opinion Research Center - NORC
Keyword(s): Child Care; Geocoded Data; Labor Force Participation; Maternal Employment; Simultaneity; Work Hours

Also: Presented: New York, NY, Population Association of America Annual Meetings, March 1999.

This paper moves beyond the typical correlates of individual mothers' decisions to participate in market work and to use non-maternal child care by examining how child care availability in the community relates to families' arrangements for employment and child care in communities of varying income level and population density. We measure center child care availability in all U.S. ZIP codes using several business-level data sources (Economic Census, ZIP code Business Patterns) and a Special Tabulation of the 1990 Decennial Census, the latter of which also provides an estimate of family day care availability. Descriptive analyses suggest that center care is more available when both a sufficient population base and a source of income (private of subsidies) are present, as in low and high income urban areas. In contrast, family day care is most available in middle income, non-metropolitan areas. Using data for 3- to 6-year olds in the geocoded Children of the NLSY data set, we (1) jointly predict whether a woman works in the market and whether she places her child in another's care and (2) simultaneously predict the number of hours employed mothers' work and the hours their children spend in relative care, center-based care, and family day care. Findings suggest that available care may be necessary for some mothers to enter the market work or to select a type of child care, especially in the non-metropolitan areas of the U.S.

Bibliography Citation
Gordon, Rachel A. and P. Lindsay Chase-Lansdale. "Women's Participation in Market Work and the Availability of Child Care in the United States." Working Paper No. 99-05, NORC and the University of Chicago, 1999.
15. Klebanov, Pamela Kato
Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne
Chase-Lansdale, P. Lindsay
Gordon, Rachel A.
Are Neighborhood Effects on Young Children Mediated by Features of the Home Environment?
In: Neighborhood Poverty: Context and Consequences for Children, Volume 1. G. Duncan, J. Brooks-Gunn, and J. Aber, eds., New York, NY: Russell Sage Foundation; 1997: 119-145
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Russell Sage Foundation
Keyword(s): Age at Birth; Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Children, Academic Development; Children, Poverty; Children, School-Age; Cognitive Ability; Family Income; Family Resources; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Infant Health and Development Program (IHDP); Maternal Employment; Neighborhood Effects; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading)

Chapter 5: Our goal in this chapter is to extend chapter 4's analyses in several ways in order to understand whether or not neighborhood of residence is linked to the actual environments of children's homes, not just to the family's income and educational resources...This chapter has three aims. The first is to look at how neighborhood composition is correlated with indicators in the home environment and cultural characteristics of the young children's mothers. Our measures include the cognitive stimulation provided to the child in the home, the physical environment of the home, the mother's warmth toward the child, the mother's mental health, the mother's coping style, and the social support received by the mother...The second aim of this chapter is to see whether or not the neighborhood effects on child outcomes reported in chapter 4 are mediated by the family-level process variables just specified...Our final aim is to go beyond examining mediated effects to explore a few likely moderated effects. The ways in which the family resource variables operate may differ as a function of the type of neighborhoods in which families reside.
Bibliography Citation
Klebanov, Pamela Kato, Jeanne Brooks-Gunn, P. Lindsay Chase-Lansdale and Rachel A. Gordon. "Are Neighborhood Effects on Young Children Mediated by Features of the Home Environment?" In: Neighborhood Poverty: Context and Consequences for Children, Volume 1. G. Duncan, J. Brooks-Gunn, and J. Aber, eds., New York, NY: Russell Sage Foundation; 1997: 119-145