Search Results

Author: Haurin, Donald R.
Resulting in 20 citations.
1. Andrew, Mark
Haurin, Donald R.
Munasib, Abdul
Explaining the Route to Owner-Occupation: A Transatlantic Comparison
Journal of Housing Economics 15,3 (September 2006): 189-216.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1051137706000180#
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): British Household Panel Survey (BHPS); Cross-national Analysis; Home Ownership; Income; Modeling, Hazard/Event History/Survival/Duration; Wealth

This paper compares the transition of young adults from renting to first-time homeownership in Britain and the U.S. By adopting a common theoretical and methodological framework, we identify behavioural similarities and differences in transitions in the two countries. We find that the higher ownership rates among British young adults are caused by quicker transitions and our study sheds light on which factors contribute to this difference. We use British and U.S. longitudinal data sets for the analysis and a relative risk Cox hazard model in the empirical work. Although there are behavioural similarities in attaining first-time homeownership with regard to the demographic and housing market variables, there are substantial differences in the two populations’ responses to income and wealth, where we find that young adults’ transitions to homeownership in Britain are more responsive.
Bibliography Citation
Andrew, Mark, Donald R. Haurin and Abdul Munasib. "Explaining the Route to Owner-Occupation: A Transatlantic Comparison." Journal of Housing Economics 15,3 (September 2006): 189-216.
2. Garasky, Steven
Haurin, R. Jean
Haurin, Donald R.
Group Living Decisions as Youth Transition to Adulthood: The Effect of Local Shelter Costs
Presented: Washington, DC, Population Association of America Meetings, March 1997
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Family Formation; Family Income; Family Studies; Household Models; Local Labor Market; Migration; Migration Patterns; Modeling, Hazard/Event History/Survival/Duration

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study follows teens through their young adulthood as they make the transition to independent living. Our hypotheses are that the probability of leaving the parental household is lower in higher real cost of shelter localities, and that, conditional on choosing to leave the parental household, the probability of their living in large groups of unrelated adults is higher in communities with relatively higher shelter costs. Data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth are merged with house price and rental data obtained from Freddie Mac-Fannie Mae and from Coldwell Banker. The unit of analysis is a person/year. The method is a discrete hazard model within a multinomial logit framework that allows for more than one possible state transition. We believe that our study is important for a broad PAA audience including students of family formation, housing and real estate, family economics, migration, and local macroeconomics.
Bibliography Citation
Garasky, Steven, R. Jean Haurin and Donald R. Haurin. "Group Living Decisions as Youth Transition to Adulthood: The Effect of Local Shelter Costs." Presented: Washington, DC, Population Association of America Meetings, March 1997.
3. Garasky, Steven
Haurin, R. Jean
Haurin, Donald R.
Group Living Decisions as Youths Transition to Adulthood
Journal of Population Economics 14,2 (June 2001): 329-349.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/qcm491pdrv032t5j/
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Home Environment; Household Composition; Mobility; Teenagers

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study follows teens through young adulthood as they transition to independent living. We focus on a little studied issue: why some youths live in groups rather than alone or with parents. This choice is important because the size of the group has a substantial impact on the demand for dwelling units; the more youths per dwelling the lower is aggregate demand and the greater is population density. Our study also adds to the knowledge of which factors influence youths' choice of destination as they leave the parental home. The empirical testing uses a discrete hazard model within a multinomial logit framework to allow for more than one possible state transition. We find that economic variables have little impact on the decision of whether to exit to a large versus a small group, while socio-demographic variables matter. We also test a new push-pull hypothesis and find that the pull of economic variables on the probability of exiting the parental home increases as youths reach their mid to late twenties.
Bibliography Citation
Garasky, Steven, R. Jean Haurin and Donald R. Haurin. "Group Living Decisions as Youths Transition to Adulthood." Journal of Population Economics 14,2 (June 2001): 329-349.
4. Gill, H. Leroy
Haurin, Donald R.
Phillips, Jeff
Mobility and Fertility in the Military
Social Science Quarterly 75,2 (June 1994): 340-353
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: University of Texas Press
Keyword(s): Earnings, Wives; Fertility; Marital Stability; Military Service; Mobility; Regions; Religion; Wages, Women; Wives, Attitudes

Permission to reprint the abstract has been denied by the publisher.

Bibliography Citation
Gill, H. Leroy, Donald R. Haurin and Jeff Phillips. "Mobility and Fertility in the Military." Social Science Quarterly 75,2 (June 1994): 340-353.
5. Haurin, Donald R.
Women's Labor Market Reactions to Family Disruptions
Review of Economics and Statistics 71,1 (February 1989): 54-61.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1928051
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: Harvard University Press
Keyword(s): Displaced Homemakers; Divorce; Earnings, Husbands; Health Factors; Husbands; Labor Force Participation; Labor Supply; Marital Disruption; Widows; Women

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper examines the impact of different types of household disruptions on women's labor supply. Utilizing data from the Mature Women's cohort (1979, 1981, and 1982) it was found that newly discovered or separated women increase their work hours more than do new widows. If a woman worked 960 hours in 1982, the increase in work time for those women recently divorced or separated is 540 hours while the estimate for widows indicates a slight decline in work time. Non-significant reactions are found if the women's husband reports a new health limitation or the husband suffers ten weeks or more of unemployment during the year.
Bibliography Citation
Haurin, Donald R. "Women's Labor Market Reactions to Family Disruptions." Review of Economics and Statistics 71,1 (February 1989): 54-61.
6. Haurin, Donald R.
Haurin, R. Jean
Net Migration, Unemployment, and the Business Cycle
Journal of Regional Science 28,2 (May 1988): 239-253.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1467-9787.1988.tb01211.x/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Business Cycles; Endogeneity; Job Turnover; Local Labor Market; Migration; Mobility, Job; Unemployment Rate

An empirical test of the effects of exogenous shocks upon a region's population size is conducted in the framework of an equilibrium locational model. The model emphasizes the separation of endogenous from exogenous factors, a point omitted in most empirical studies of aggregate migration. Exogenous changes are manifested in the local relative cost of living and the local relative unemployment rate. Hypotheses are supported in analyses of data from both the NLSY as well as Census. Surprisingly, a simple measure of the size of a shock to a regional economy has the greatest explanatory power compared with more sophisticated measures based on prior business cycles.
Bibliography Citation
Haurin, Donald R. and R. Jean Haurin. "Net Migration, Unemployment, and the Business Cycle." Journal of Regional Science 28,2 (May 1988): 239-253.
7. Haurin, Donald R.
Haurin, R. Jean
The Migration of Youth and the Business Cycle: 1978 to 1984
Economic Development Quarterly 1,2 (May 1987): 162-169.
Also: http://edq.sagepub.com/content/1/2/162.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Business Cycles; Labor Force Participation; Labor Supply; Manpower Programs; Migration

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study investigates whether the relocational choices of youth correspond to the business cycle, and identifies other correlates with relocation decisions. Analysis is based on a state's viewpoint and policy questions are evaluated in this context. The authors find that the migration of youth is highly cyclical and that in a downturn relative to the rest of the nation, a state can lose a substantial proportion of its youth, the group forming the next generation of a state's labor supply. The coordination of redevelopment goals calls for states to not only concentrate on attracting desired types of employers, but also on retaining a labor force with the appropriate skills. In particular, the study indicates that midwestern states which have recently focused on attracting "high-tech" industries have simultaneously lost their brightest and most highly motivated youth. Some support was found for the hypothesis that a state supported jobs program can tide youth over the downturn and raise their long-term retention probability.
Bibliography Citation
Haurin, Donald R. and R. Jean Haurin. "The Migration of Youth and the Business Cycle: 1978 to 1984." Economic Development Quarterly 1,2 (May 1987): 162-169.
8. Haurin, Donald R.
Haurin, R. Jean
Youth Migration in Deindustrializing Regions of the United States
Presented: Cambridge, UK, Regional Science Association Twenty-Ninth European Congress, August 1989
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Regional Science Association International
Keyword(s): Geographical Variation; Migration; Mobility, Labor Market; Unemployment; Wages

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Because youth are the most mobile cohort in the U.S., theories about the causes of migration are best tested upon this subgroup. The focus of this research is to analyze the causes of out-migration and return migration of youth in a region of the U.S. that is in the process of decreasing employment in its manufacturing sector and increasing employment in its service sector, that is, the "rust belt". There are three major topics in the research. The first measures the aggregate amount of out and net youth migration from a deindustrializing region in the U.S. Migration in each year (1979-1987) in this region is compared to that in a similarly sized area where manufacturing employment increased. The second topic uses micro data to analyze the determinants of a youth's length of stay in a region. The empirical model allows for censoring and for time-varying explanatory factors and thus, corresponds to the temporal sequence of the locational decision-making process of youth. The third topic uses the same micro data set to analyze remigration to the home (deindustrializing) region. Here, the authors attempt to identify the characteristics of youth that are correlated with a successful out-migration. The empirical model again uses duration methods for analysis. Utilizing data from the 1979-1987 NLSY, the authors test for the factors that affect the migration decision of youth and then compare these results with their model of the remigration decision of previous out-migrants. The application is to a deindustrializing region of the U.S. and the results are contrasted with those for a region of similar spatial size which experienced growth in manufacturing employment.
Bibliography Citation
Haurin, Donald R. and R. Jean Haurin. "Youth Migration in Deindustrializing Regions of the United States." Presented: Cambridge, UK, Regional Science Association Twenty-Ninth European Congress, August 1989.
9. Haurin, Donald R.
Haurin, R. Jean
Youth Migration in the United States: An Analysis of a Deindustrializing Region
In: Migration Models: Macro and Micro Perspectives. J. Stillwell and P. Congdon, eds. London, England: Belhaven Press, 1990
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Belhaven Press
Keyword(s): Gender Differences; Migration; Regions; Wages

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The focus of this research is to present a methodology appropriate for analyzing the causes of out-migration and return migration of youth. The application is to a region of the U.S. that is in the process of decreasing employment in its manufacturing sector and increasing employment in its service sector (the region is popularly known as the 'rust belt'). A longitudinal series of observations of individuals and families is used to analyze the determinants of the length of stay in a region. The empirical model allows for time-varying explanatory factors and thus corresponds to the temporal sequence of the locational decision-making process. Explanatory factors include measures of the potential benefits of migration (a higher expected wage or probability of employment) and measures that influence the cost of migration. Results indicate that the likelihood of outmigration is influenced by the probability of obtaining a job in the alternative area and some measures of the cost of relocation (for example, loss of job tenure). The same data set is used to analyze remigration to the home (deindustrializing) region. The empirical model uses duration methods for analysis and results indicate that remigration is only related to relatively long periods of personal unemployment in the new location.
Bibliography Citation
Haurin, Donald R. and R. Jean Haurin. "Youth Migration in the United States: An Analysis of a Deindustrializing Region" In: Migration Models: Macro and Micro Perspectives. J. Stillwell and P. Congdon, eds. London, England: Belhaven Press, 1990
10. Haurin, Donald R.
Hendershott, Patric H.
Kim, Dongwook
Housing Decisions of American Youth
Journal of Urban Economics 35,1 (January 1994): 28-45.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0094119084710023
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Academic Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Cohabitation; Demography; Earnings; Family Background and Culture; Family Formation; Home Ownership; Household Composition; Household Structure; Labor Supply

The relationship of household tenure decision with household formation and labor supply choices is examined. Primary data used was the 1987 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth which was filled out by respondents aged 22 to 29 years old. Results show that young adults' decisions whether to live alone (single/married), or to cohabit with parents or other adults is influenced by potential earnings and housing rental costs. Household tenure choice, on the other hand, depends on wealth, the relative homeowning cost and demographic variables such as gender, presence of children and race. Finally, housing demand is swayed by potential wage, wealth and owner cost, but not by demographic and family background factors.
Bibliography Citation
Haurin, Donald R., Patric H. Hendershott and Dongwook Kim. "Housing Decisions of American Youth." Journal of Urban Economics 35,1 (January 1994): 28-45.
11. Haurin, Donald R.
Hendershott, Patric H.
Kim, Dongwook
Real Rents and Household Formation: The Effect of the Tax Reform Act of 1986
Working Paper, Department of Economics, The Ohio State University, Columbus OH, 1990
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Department of Economics, The Ohio State University
Keyword(s): Assets; Family Income; Household Models; Household Structure; Income; Marital Status; Residence; Taxes; Wages

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Although the economic literature has analyzed some components of the headship decision, study of household formation has been primarily in the realm of demography. The authors begin this analysis with a pure demographic model and expand it to include additional determinants of the decision to remain with parents or not, to marry or not, and to live with a group or separately. The results, based on a sample of 2355 youth in their twenties from the NLSY, indicate that (1) rental costs, wealth, and the potential wage that a youth could earn are important variables in explaining the outcomes of these choices and (2) inclusion of the economic variables significantly changes the estimated impacts of the demographic variables. One insight that the expanded economic model allows is the prediction that some public policies will affect headship rates of youth. This prediction is of interest because choices of living arrangements often have implications for demands upon public services and housing. Using as an example the 1986 Tax Reform Act, the authors focus on a single outcome: the expectation of higher rental costs. If rentals rise by 20 percent, as predicted by some tax analysts, there will be an estimated half million reduction in the number of 1986 households formed by youth ages 21 to 29.
Bibliography Citation
Haurin, Donald R., Patric H. Hendershott and Dongwook Kim. "Real Rents and Household Formation: The Effect of the Tax Reform Act of 1986." Working Paper, Department of Economics, The Ohio State University, Columbus OH, 1990.
12. Haurin, Donald R.
Hendershott, Patric H.
Kim, Dongwook
Tenure Choice of American Youth
Working Paper, Department of Economics, The Ohio State University, Columbus OH, 1990
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Department of Economics, The Ohio State University
Keyword(s): Family Income; Home Ownership; Household Structure; Marital Status; Simultaneity; Wages; Wealth

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

While there seems to be no end to estimates of housing tenure determinants, prior studies have not accounted for the simultaneity of tenure choice with household formation, labor supply or the marriage decision. Estimates presented here are superior to those in the literature both because the authors address these issues and because they better measure the cost of owning relative to renting. Accounting for simultaneity with the household formation and labor supply decisions matter. Using a household's predicted wage rate rather than its observed income doubles the response of tenure choice to the price of owning relative to renting. Including household formation selectivity correction variables cuts the response of tenure choice to the predicted wage by 25 percent. Moreover, the impact of variations in demographic variables on tenure choice is sharply reduced after correcting for selectivity bias.
Bibliography Citation
Haurin, Donald R., Patric H. Hendershott and Dongwook Kim. "Tenure Choice of American Youth." Working Paper, Department of Economics, The Ohio State University, Columbus OH, 1990.
13. Haurin, Donald R.
Hendershott, Patric H.
Kim, Dongwook
The Impact of Real Rents and Wages on Household Formation
Review of Economics and Statistics 75,2 (May 1993): 284-293.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2109434
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Harvard University Press
Keyword(s): Demography; Household Composition; Household Income; Local Labor Market; Regions

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Although the economic literature has analyzed some components of the headship decision, study of household formation has been primarily in the realm of demography. We expand the demographic model to include economic determinants of the decision to remain with parents or not, and to live with a group or separately. We focus on measuring the effect of spatial variations in rental costs on the probability of forming a household. Our results, based on a sample of 2,573 youths in their twenties, indicate that the cost of housing and potential labor earnings are important variables in explaining this probability.
Bibliography Citation
Haurin, Donald R., Patric H. Hendershott and Dongwook Kim. "The Impact of Real Rents and Wages on Household Formation." Review of Economics and Statistics 75,2 (May 1993): 284-293.
14. Haurin, Donald R.
Munasib, Abdul
Rosenthal, Stuart S.
Terminations of First-Time Homeownership
Economics Working Paper Series OKSWP0702, Department of Economics, Oklahoma State University, 2007.
Also: http://spears.okstate.edu/ecls-working-papers/files/0702_Munasib_SustianFHO.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Department of Economics, Oklahoma State University
Keyword(s): Home Ownership; Racial Differences; Wealth

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The cliché “once a homeowner, always a homeowner” is not true. We study the causes of terminations of spells of first-time homeownership. Using a national panel data set, we find that the likelihood of a household terminating a spell of homeownership is predictable at the time of purchase. Specifically, the lower the probability score that a household becomes an owner at the time of purchase, the greater the likelihood of termination of the subsequent ownership spell. This finding suggests that post-purchase counseling programs can be targeted toward those most at risk at the time of home purchase. We also find that postpurchase events affect the likelihood of termination. Important factors include changes in household earnings and wealth, house value, unemployment rates, family size, and marital status. There are substantial racial differences in termination rates. Some of these differences are explained by differences in household characteristics at the time of home purchase, and some by differences in post-purchase events or households’ reactions to them.
Bibliography Citation
Haurin, Donald R., Abdul Munasib and Stuart S. Rosenthal. "Terminations of First-Time Homeownership." Economics Working Paper Series OKSWP0702, Department of Economics, Oklahoma State University, 2007.
15. Haurin, Donald R.
Parcel, Toby L.
Haurin, R. Jean
Does Homeownership Affect Child Outcomes?
Real Estate Economics 30,4 (Winter 2002):635-667.
Also: http://search.epnet.com/direct.asp?an=7717323&db=buh
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association (AREUEA)
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Behavior; Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Behavioral Problems; Children, Behavioral Development; Cognitive Ability; Home Environment; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Home Ownership; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The data set that forms the basis for our analysis is the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY), augmented by the NLSY-Child Data. We study the impact of homeowning on the cognitive and behavioral outcomes of children. Using four waves of a comprehensive national panel data set, we control for many social, demographic and economic variables previously found to influence child outcomes. The data are a panel, allowing us to control for unobserved household-and child-specific factors. We use a treatment effects model to address the issue of possible sample selection bias caused by unobserved variables that influence both the parent's choice of whether to own or rent and whether to invest in their children. We find that owning a home compared with renting leads to a 13 to 23% higher quality home environment, greater cognitive ability and fewer child behavior problems. For children living in owned homes, math achievement is up to 9% higher, reading achievement is up to 7% higher, and children's behavioral problems are 1 to 3% lower. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Haurin, Donald R., Toby L. Parcel and R. Jean Haurin. "Does Homeownership Affect Child Outcomes?" Real Estate Economics 30,4 (Winter 2002):635-667.
16. Haurin, Donald R.
Parcel, Toby L.
Haurin, R. Jean
The Impact of Home Ownership on Child Outcomes
Presented: Boston, MA, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, Allied Social Science Association Meetings, January 2000
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association (AREUEA)
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Behavioral Problems; Cognitive Ability; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Income; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Wages, Adult; Wages, Men; Wages, Women; Wealth

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We analyze the impact of home owning on the cognitive and behavioral outcomes of children. Our study controls for many social, demographic and economic variables previously found to influence child outcomes. We also address the issue of possible sample selection bias caused by unobserved variables that influence both the parent's choice of whether to own or rent and parental investment in their children. The study uses four waves of a national data set, permitting a panel data analysis of the relationship of owning a home to three child outcomes: math achievement, reading recognition and behavior problems. Using panel data allows us to control for household and child-specific, unobserved, influential factors. We also use a treatment effects model to address the problem of sample selection bias. We find that owning a home compared with renting leads to a higher quality home environment, the improvement being 16 to 22 percent. Considering both the direct and indirect effects of home ownership on child outcomes, we find that for children living in owned homes, math achievement is up to seven percent higher and reading achievement is up to six percent higher, ceteris paribus. We also find that the measure of a child's behavior problems is up to four percent lower if the child resides in an owned home. Existing literature suggests that these youth's greater cognitive abilities and fewer behavioral problems will result in higher educational attainment, greater future earnings, and a reduced tendency to engage in deviant behaviors.
Bibliography Citation
Haurin, Donald R., Toby L. Parcel and R. Jean Haurin. "The Impact of Home Ownership on Child Outcomes." Presented: Boston, MA, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, Allied Social Science Association Meetings, January 2000.
17. Haurin, Donald R.
Parcel, Toby L.
Haurin, R. Jean
The Impact of Home Ownership on Child Outcomes
In: Low-income Homeownership: Examining the Unexamined Goal. Nicholas P. Retsinas and Eric S. Belsky, eds. Washington, DC: Brookings Institution Press, 2002: pp. 427-446
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Brookings Institution
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Behavioral Problems; Children, Behavioral Development; Home Environment; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Home Ownership; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Residence

We analyze the impact of home owning on the cognitive and behavioral outcomes of children. Our study controls for many social, demographic, and economic variables previously found to influence child outcomes. We also address the issue of possible sample selection bias caused by unobserved variables that influence both the parent's choice of whether to own or rent and parental investment in their children.

The study uses four waves of a national data set, permitting a panel data analysis of the relationship of owning a home to three child outcomes: math achievement, reading recognition and behavior problems. Using panel data allows us to control for household and child-specific, unobserved, influential factors. We also use a treatment effects model to address the problem of sample selection bias.

We find that owning a home compared with renting leads to a higher quality home environment, the improvement being 16 to 22 percent. Considering both the direct and indirect effects of home ownership on child outcomes, we find that for children living in owned homes math achievement is up to seven percent higher and reading achievement is up to six percent higher, ceteris paribus. We also find that the measure of a child's behavior problems is up to four percent lower if the child resides in an owned home. Existing literature suggests that these youths' greater cognitive abilities and fewer behavioral problems will result in higher educational attainment, greater future earnings, and a reduced tendency to engage in deviant behaviors

Bibliography Citation
Haurin, Donald R., Toby L. Parcel and R. Jean Haurin. "The Impact of Home Ownership on Child Outcomes" In: Low-income Homeownership: Examining the Unexamined Goal. Nicholas P. Retsinas and Eric S. Belsky, eds. Washington, DC: Brookings Institution Press, 2002: pp. 427-446
18. Haurin, Donald R.
Parcel, Toby L.
Haurin, R. Jean
The Impact of Homeownership on Child Outcomes
Working Paper LIH0-01.14, Joint Center for Housing Studies, Harvard University, Cambridge MA, October 2001.
Also: http://www.jchs.harvard.edu/research/publications/impact-homeownership-child-outcomes
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Joint Center for Housing Studies of Harvard University
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Cognitive Ability; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Home Ownership; Income; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Residence; Wages, Adult; Wages, Men; Wages, Women; Wealth

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Does homeownership affect the outcomes of resident children? Using a national data set, we observed that children of homeowners have better home environments, high cognitive test scores, and fewer behavior problems than do children of renters. We find that these results hold even after controlling for a large number of economic, social, and demographic variables. Owning a home compared with renting leads to 13 to 23 percent higher quality home environment, ceteris paribus. The independent impact of homeownership combined with its positive impact on the home environment results in the children of owners achieving math scores up to nine percent higher, reading scores up to seven percent higher, and reductions in children's behavior problems of up to three percent. These findings suggest homeowners support programs should be targeted at households with young children.
Bibliography Citation
Haurin, Donald R., Toby L. Parcel and R. Jean Haurin. "The Impact of Homeownership on Child Outcomes." Working Paper LIH0-01.14, Joint Center for Housing Studies, Harvard University, Cambridge MA, October 2001.
19. Haurin, Donald R.
Rosenthal, Stuart S.
The Sustainability of Homeownership: Factors Affecting the Duration of Homeownership and Rental Spells
Contract C-OPC-21895 - Task Order No. 4, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, Office of Policy Development and Research, Washington, DC, December 2004.
Also: http://www.huduser.org/Publications/pdf/homeownsustainability.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development
Keyword(s): Home Ownership; Racial Differences; Residence

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study uses a national data set (the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth-NLSY) that follows a cohort of individuals for 21 years. Their residence histories are tracked, measuring the time spent in each type of tenure. This data set provides extensive information about the socio-demographic characteristics of individuals, allowing one to study the determinants of the length of an ownership spell, or a rental spell. The data are weighted to make the sample nationally representative.

The analysis begins by distinguishing between the length of stay in a particular dwelling and the duration of stay in one or more owned homes. All existing published studies focus on the length of stay in a dwelling (either owner or rented), or on the time to mortgage default. These studies focus on the time spent in a particular dwelling unit, not the length of time in a particular “state of the world” such as owning or renting. While these studies are of interest for some questions, they do not provide the needed information to determine whether different lengths of continuous spells of owning or renting contribute to racial gaps in homeownership rates.

A simple example confirms that the lengths of time spent as a renter and owner affect the overall ownership rate. Assume that African Americans and whites have the same residence history over a 40 year period, consisting of four spells: first the individual rents, then owns, then rents, then owns. If African Americans spend 9 years in each rental spell and 11 years in each ownership spell, then their average homeownership rate will be 0.45. If whites spend 6 years in each rental spell and 14 in each ownership spell, then their average homeownership rate will be 0.70. In this case, the sole cause of the 25 percentage point gap in ownership rates is the difference in the durations of spells of owning and renting.

The study of duration of renting and owning should lead to important policy implications. Policies that promote only temporary spells of homeownership have little impact on the national homeownership rate. What is important is promoting new ownership spells that are sustainable. Policies that lengthen existing ownership spells also will raise the national ownership rate, even if the rate of attaining first-time or subsequent spells of ownership is not affected.

Bibliography Citation
Haurin, Donald R. and Stuart S. Rosenthal. "The Sustainability of Homeownership: Factors Affecting the Duration of Homeownership and Rental Spells." Contract C-OPC-21895 - Task Order No. 4, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, Office of Policy Development and Research, Washington, DC, December 2004.
20. Shaw, Lois B.
D'Amico, Ronald
Gagen, Mary G.
Gitter, Robert J.
Haurin, Donald R.
Morgan, William R.
Mott, Frank L.
Peters, Elizabeth
Dual Careers, Volume 6: Fifteen Year Report on the National Longitudinal Surveys Mature Women's Cohort
Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1985
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): Education; Employment; Family Constraints; Job Patterns; Marital Disruption; Marriage; Racial Differences

Fifteen years of data from the NLS cohort of Mature Women are analyzed. Chapter one describes the extent of the decreasing family responsibilities and increasing labor market involvement for these women over the fifteen-year period. Chapter two explores the employment patterns of white and black women following the birth of their first child. Chapter three examines the degree of responsibility given to women age 45 to 59 for the pay and promotion decisions of others. Chapter four describes the education the women received between 1967 and 1982, and chapter five examines the extent to which they increased their labor market involvement as a result of family disruptions or husband's employment or disability. Chapter six describes the factors that determine women's early withdrawal from the labor market. Chapter seven illustrates the usefulness of hazard rate models in exploring the transition from divorce to remarriage and finds a striking difference in the mean duration to remarriage between whites and non-whites. Chapter eight focuses on the retirement plans and expected pension of white and black middle aged women.
Bibliography Citation
Shaw, Lois B., Ronald D'Amico, Mary G. Gagen, Robert J. Gitter, Donald R. Haurin, William R. Morgan, Frank L. Mott and Elizabeth Peters. Dual Careers, Volume 6: Fifteen Year Report on the National Longitudinal Surveys Mature Women's Cohort. Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1985.