Search Results

Author: Daymont, Thomas N.
Resulting in 18 citations.
1. Andrisani, Paul J.
Daymont, Thomas N.
The Age Mix of the Labor Force in 1990: Implications for Labor Market Research
In: Changing Composition of the Workforce. A.S. Glickman, ed. New York, NY: Plenum Press, 1982
Cohort(s): Mature Women, Older Men, Young Men, Young Women
Publisher: Plenum Publishing Corporation
Keyword(s): Age and Ageing; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Career Patterns; Discrimination, Age; Life Cycle Research; Research Methodology; Sex Equality; Work Attitudes

This article reviews problems associated with the labor force projections produced by the Bureau of Labor Statistics and advocates a more behavioral approach. The authors summarize the findings of recent efforts among economists to incorporate social and psychological variables into models of labor market behavior and find that future research is needed: (1) to determine the degree to which the effect of the projected changing age structure of the population varies across different segments of the labor market and over different stages of the life cycle and time periods; (2) to determine why those members of the baby boom cohort who experienced long and/or frequent spells of unemployment will probably be more likely than others to suffer labor market problems throughout their careers; (3) to improve both the conceptualization and measurement of labor force data to capture more adequately the varying degrees of attachment to the labor force and varying degrees of intensity of job search; (4) to understand better the dynamic forces producing strains among women managing dual careers; and (5) to point up problems of age discrimination in employment, which may begin to rival race and sex-based forms of labor market inequality in future decades.
Bibliography Citation
Andrisani, Paul J. and Thomas N. Daymont. "The Age Mix of the Labor Force in 1990: Implications for Labor Market Research" In: Changing Composition of the Workforce. A.S. Glickman, ed. New York, NY: Plenum Press, 1982
2. Borus, Michael E.
Carpenter, Susan A.
Crowley, Joan E.
Daymont, Thomas N.
Kim, Choongsoo
Pollard, Tom K.
Rumberger, Russell W.
Santos, Richard
Pathways to the Future, Volume II: A Final Report on the National Survey of Youth Labor Market Experience in 1980
Report, Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1982
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): Blue-Collar Jobs; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Dropouts; Marital Status; Teenagers; Unemployment; Vocational Education; Wages, Reservation

This is the final report on the 1980 data from the NLSY derived from interviews with 12,141 young people, age 15- 23. Topics examined include: SANTOS -- Chapter 1, the variables affecting the employment prospects of unemployed youth; POLLARD -- Chapter 2, the changes in employment patterns of black and white young men in the decade of the 1970s; KIM -- Chapter 3, the changing patterns in wage and reservation wage differentials for black and white young men during the 1970s; BORUS & CARPENTER -- Chapter 4, the variables affecting the decision to drop out of school without finishing the 12th grade, the decision to return to school after having dropped out, and the decision to go directly to college after completing the 12th grade; RUMBERGER & DAYMONT -- Chapter 5, the effects of high school curriculum on labor market success; and CROWLEY -- Chapter 6, the relationship between delinquency and employment status.
Bibliography Citation
Borus, Michael E., Susan A. Carpenter, Joan E. Crowley, Thomas N. Daymont, Choongsoo Kim, Tom K. Pollard, Russell W. Rumberger and Richard Santos. Pathways to the Future, Volume II: A Final Report on the National Survey of Youth Labor Market Experience in 1980. Report, Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1982.
3. D'Amico, Ronald
Daymont, Thomas N.
Industrial Organization, Economic Conditions, and the Labor Market Success of Young Men: An Overview and Extension
Social Science Research 11,3 (September 1982): 201-226.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0049089X82900096
Cohort(s): Young Men
Publisher: Academic Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Business Cycles; Capital Sector; Industrial Sector; Job Tenure; Job Turnover; Socioeconomic Status (SES); Unemployment; Unions; Wages

The relationship between workplace organization and socioeconomic attainments of workers, although an issue of some currency in contemporary stratification research, is complex and as yet not well understood. In contrast to dual economic theory, this paper attempts to sort out the separate effects of various components of the social organization of production (e.g., profitability, capital intensity, market power, unionization) on job rewards. Moreover, various considerations suggest that these structural effects vary with business cycle activity. Accordingly, one of the research aims is to examine the extent to which various dimensions of organizational structure serve to differentially insulate workers from wage stagnation as economic conditions deteriorate. Finally, because firms may devise different institutional responses to declining product demand, these structural effects on both wage rates and unemployment propensities are examined.
Bibliography Citation
D'Amico, Ronald and Thomas N. Daymont. "Industrial Organization, Economic Conditions, and the Labor Market Success of Young Men: An Overview and Extension." Social Science Research 11,3 (September 1982): 201-226.
4. Daymont, Thomas N.
Changes in Black-White Labor Market Opportunities, 1966-1976
In: Work and Retirement, A Longitudinal Study of Men. H.S. Parnes, ed. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1981
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: MIT Press
Keyword(s): Discrimination, Racial/Ethnic; Racial Differences; Wages

Data from the 1976 and earlier surveys of Older Men, 45-59 in 1966, are used to assess the efforts made over the previous decade by the federal government and many private groups to improve the labor market opportunities of older black men. Using two measures of success-hourly rate of pay and amount of unemployment experienced by an individual--and two regression models for each measure, it is concluded that the opportunities for older black men improved from 1966 to 1976, although racial equity has still not been attained.
Bibliography Citation
Daymont, Thomas N. "Changes in Black-White Labor Market Opportunities, 1966-1976" In: Work and Retirement, A Longitudinal Study of Men. H.S. Parnes, ed. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1981
5. Daymont, Thomas N.
Pay Premiums for Economic Sector and Race: A Decomposition
Social Science Research 9,3 (September 1980): 245-272.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0049089X80900149
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: Academic Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Dual Economic Theory; Job Skills; Public Sector; Unions; Wages

This study examines two issues concerning a dual economy theory of labor markets. First, the economic sectors are analyzed for the degree to which differences in rates of pay are accounted for by sector differences in: human capital composition, unionization, occupational skill requirements and other factors producing an ability and willingness to pay high wages. The primary factors that produce a pay premium in the monopoly sector are its willingness to pay high wages and its higher levels of unionization. Second, the results of a decomposition by race show that contrary to prior research, blacks are found to be relatively more disadvantaged in the competitive sector.
Bibliography Citation
Daymont, Thomas N. "Pay Premiums for Economic Sector and Race: A Decomposition." Social Science Research 9,3 (September 1980): 245-272.
6. Daymont, Thomas N.
Pay Premiums for Economic Sector and Race: A Decomposition
Report, Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, October 1979
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): Dual Economic Theory; Job Skills; Unions; Wages

his study examines two issues concerning a dual economy theory of labor markets. First, the economic sectors are analyzed for the degree to which differences in rates of pay are accounted for by sector differences in: human capital composition, unionization, occupational skill requirements and other factors producing an ability and willingness to pay high wages. The primary factors that produce a pay premium in the monopoly sector are its willingness to pay high wages and its higher levels of unionization. Second, the results of a decomposition by race show that contrary to prior research, blacks are found to be relatively more disadvantaged in the competitive sector.
Bibliography Citation
Daymont, Thomas N. "Pay Premiums for Economic Sector and Race: A Decomposition." Report, Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, October 1979.
7. Daymont, Thomas N.
Racial Equity, Racial Equality, and Reverse Discrimination
Report, Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1980
Cohort(s): Young Men
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): Discrimination, Racial/Ethnic; Earnings; Kinship; Racial Differences; Wages

The author examines the degree of compatibility between the two goals of racial equity and equality. This is done by a regression standardization procedure which projects future levels of black-white earnings ratio. The most interesting projections deal with the assumptions of racial equity in labor market and educational institutions. The results show convergence of the black-white ratio to be a very slow process--another fifty years for it to reach 95. To the extent that racial equality is a goal of public policy, the findings show that this cannot be achieved without reverse discrimination.
Bibliography Citation
Daymont, Thomas N. "Racial Equity, Racial Equality, and Reverse Discrimination." Report, Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1980.
8. Daymont, Thomas N.
Andrisani, Paul J.
Economic Returns to Military Service
Technical Report, Center for Labor and Human Resource Studies, Temple University. Prepared for the U.S. Army Recruiting Command, Evaluation Directorate, Fort Sheridan, Illinois, November 1986.
Also: http://www.dtic.mil/cgi-bin/GetTRDoc?AD=ADA179252&Location=U2&doc=GetTRDoc.pdf
Cohort(s): Older Men, Young Men
Publisher: Center for Labor and Human Resource Studies, Temple University
Keyword(s): Earnings; Education; Legislation; Military Service; Military Training; Racial Differences; Unemployment; Veterans

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The purpose of this study is to assess the extent to which service in the military is a good career investment for young men. Many young men enter the Armed Forces with the anticipation that their training and experiences will enhance their civilian careers. However, others seem to hold the negative view that skills obtained through military training have little payoff in the civilian labor market. Using data from the NLS of Older Men and Young Men, this study found that: (1) there is a significant earnings advantage for young men in the military relative to their civilian counterparts; (2) the earnings of servicemen drop substantially at the time of separation; (3) civilian earnings of former servicemen then rise rapidly and overtake the earnings of their civilian counterparts within one to four years after separation; (4) higher earnings of veterans persist until the end of the period covered by the study; (5) many veterans go back to school to further their education; (6) veterans who obtain college education earn more than men who work in the civilian labor market and then go to college; (7) unemployment trajectories mirror the earnings trajectories; (8) economic returns to military service for minorities are greater than for whites; (9) civilian earnings for Army veterans are lower than other services; (10) small differences exist among those with combat arms, technical, and other types of military service in terms of subsequent civilian earnings.
Bibliography Citation
Daymont, Thomas N. and Paul J. Andrisani. "Economic Returns to Military Service." Technical Report, Center for Labor and Human Resource Studies, Temple University. Prepared for the U.S. Army Recruiting Command, Evaluation Directorate, Fort Sheridan, Illinois, November 1986.
9. Daymont, Thomas N.
Andrisani, Paul J.
Research Uses of the National Longitudinal Surveys: An Update
Review of Public Data Use 2,3 (October 1983): 203-310
Cohort(s): NLS General
Publisher: U.S. Department of Commerce
Keyword(s): Research Methodology

This article comprehensively surveys the research that has been done using the data from the National Longitudinal Surveys, including both the four original NLS cohorts and the new youth cohort. It is an update of the previous survey by William T. Bielby, Clifford Hawley, and David Bills, and documents the accelerated growth and increasing diversification in NLS based research that has taken place since their report. However, in addition to updating that survey, this article also discusses some reasons for the extensive use of the NLS and identifies some research areas in which future NLS studies are likely to yield high intellectual dividends.
Bibliography Citation
Daymont, Thomas N. and Paul J. Andrisani. "Research Uses of the National Longitudinal Surveys: An Update." Review of Public Data Use 2,3 (October 1983): 203-310.
10. Daymont, Thomas N.
Andrisani, Paul J.
The Health and Economic Status of Very Early Retirees
Aging and Work 6,2 (1983): 117-135
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: National Council on the Aging
Keyword(s): Benefits, Disability; Early Retirement; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Mortality; Pensions; Retirees; Retirement; Social Security

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study begins by reviewing key issues raised in the Kingson-Myers debate. Then, using Kingson's analysis as a point of departure, we compare the health and economic status of different groups of Very Early Retirees (VERs). Comparisons of mortality, functional and work limitations indicate that Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) recipients had somewhat more severe health problems and work limitations than unhealthy nonrecipients of SSDI. A substantial number of unhealthy nonrecipients of SSDI received other disability benefits or appeared to be ineligible for SSDI for reasons other than health. Unhealthy VERs who did not receive any disability benefits suffered somewhat greater economic hardship than did recipients of SSDI or other disability benefits. Group differences in health notwithstanding, the finding that a substantial proportion of nonrecipients with severe health problems experienced poverty indicates Kingson's concern that some unhealthy VERs may have been denied SSDI benefits unfairly is warranted. But the analysis also reveals that the social problem is not nearly as large as Kingson's analysis suggests, and a few SSDI recipients may not have deserved benefits.
Bibliography Citation
Daymont, Thomas N. and Paul J. Andrisani. "The Health and Economic Status of Very Early Retirees." Aging and Work 6,2 (1983): 117-135.
11. Daymont, Thomas N.
Rumberger, Russell W.
Impact of High School Curriculum on the Earnings and Employability of Youth
In: Job Training for Youth. R.E. Taylor, et al., eds. Columbus, OH: National Center for Research in Vocational Education, The Ohio State University, 1982
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: National Center for Research in Vocational Education, The Ohio State University
Keyword(s): Earnings; Educational Attainment; Educational Returns; High School Curriculum; Job Training; Schooling; Vocational Education

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study looks at differences in high school curricula and relates high school training to occupations and labor market success. The authors examine whether the returns to vocational training acquired in high school are contingent on whether students obtain an occupation corresponding to their specialty area and examine race and sex differences in both high school training and labor market opportunities.
Bibliography Citation
Daymont, Thomas N. and Russell W. Rumberger. "Impact of High School Curriculum on the Earnings and Employability of Youth" In: Job Training for Youth. R.E. Taylor, et al., eds. Columbus, OH: National Center for Research in Vocational Education, The Ohio State University, 1982
12. Daymont, Thomas N.
Statham, Anne
Occupational Atypicality: Changes, Causes, and Consequences
In: Unplanned Careers: The Working Lives of Middle-Aged Women. L.B. Shaw, ed. Lexington, MA: Lexington Books, 1983
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: Jossey-Bass
Keyword(s): Family Influences; Occupational Segregation; Occupations, Female; Work Reentry

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Little change was found in the tendency for middle-aged women to be employed in female-typed occupations. Family constraints on the time and energies of women do not explain the differential allocation of women to male-and female-typed occupations. Among whites, those who displayed a strong commitment to the labor market were only very slightly more likely than women with a weak commitment to be in atypical or male-typed occupations; moreover, among blacks, those who displayed a strong commitment to the labor market were actually slightly more likely to be in female-typed occupations. These results thus contradict the hypothesis, derived from human-capital theory that occupational sex segregation is largely explained by men and women choosing different occupations based on differences in their commitment to the labor market.
Bibliography Citation
Daymont, Thomas N. and Anne Statham. "Occupational Atypicality: Changes, Causes, and Consequences" In: Unplanned Careers: The Working Lives of Middle-Aged Women. L.B. Shaw, ed. Lexington, MA: Lexington Books, 1983
13. Daymont, Thomas N.
Tsai, Pan Long
Sex Inequality in the Labor Market: A Multidisciplinary Approach
Presented: Toronto, Canada, American Sociological Association Annual Meetings, 1981
Cohort(s): Young Men, Young Women
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Discrimination, Sex; Earnings; Family Influences; Gender Differences; Life Cycle Research; Marital Status; NLS of H.S. Class of 1972; Part-Time Work; Research Methodology; Schooling; Sex Equality; Sexual Division of Labor

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The authors argue that by considering theories from a variety of disciplines and the complementarities among them, our understanding of sex inequality in the labor market can be improved. Further, these theories suggest important sex differences in labor market preferences and preparations that have not previously been included in empirical studies. Our results indicate that at least for young college graduates, a substantial amount of sex inequality in labor market position is due to the traditional sex-based division of labor within the home and sex differences in labor market preferences, preparations, and participation. These factors accounted for nearly one-half of the sex difference in occupational sex type and almost 90 percent of the sex difference in hourly earnings. The results also indicated that no one set of factors were dominant in explaining occupational and sex inequality in earnings.
Bibliography Citation
Daymont, Thomas N. and Pan Long Tsai. "Sex Inequality in the Labor Market: A Multidisciplinary Approach." Presented: Toronto, Canada, American Sociological Association Annual Meetings, 1981.
14. Parnes, Herbert S.
Nestel, Gilbert
Chirikos, Thomas N.
Daymont, Thomas N.
Mott, Frank L.
Parsons, Donald O.
From the Middle to the Later Years: Longitudinal Studies of the Preretirement and Postretirement Experiences of Men
Report, Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1979
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): Employment; Family Background and Culture; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Household Income; Mortality; Retirement

The pre-retirement labor market behavior and the post-retirement experience of men between ages 45 and 69 are examined. This analysis shows the extension of the surveys beyond the originally planned five years. Both labor market behaviors and post-retirement experience are based on longitudinal data collected by periodic personal interviews with the same sample of men between l966 and l976. This is volume 5 in a series. This volume was also published by MIT Press as Work and Retirement.
Bibliography Citation
Parnes, Herbert S., Gilbert Nestel, Thomas N. Chirikos, Thomas N. Daymont, Frank L. Mott and Donald O. Parsons. From the Middle to the Later Years: Longitudinal Studies of the Preretirement and Postretirement Experiences of Men. Report, Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1979.
15. Phillips, Robert L.
Andrisani, Paul J.
Daymont, Thomas N.
Military Service Effects for Minority Youth
Presented: Boston, MA, Eastern Economic Association Meetings, March 1988
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Eastern Economic Association
Keyword(s): Earnings; Military Service; Minorities; Minorities, Youth; Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Since the advent fifteen years ago of the all volunteer force, there has been various levels of concern about the increasing minority composition of the armed forces. The purpose of this paper is to turn around the focus of concern, examine the reasons that minority youth are attracted to the service as well as assess the impact of service on the youth. Both in-service and post-service aspects are examined. The latter is primarily based upon a pooled cross-section time-series data file from the NLSY. The analysis shows that minority youth have equal opportunity in the armed forces with respect to accession opportunity, pay, promotion, career opportunity, and job-satisfaction. Further, when compared to their non-veteran counterparts, veteran minority youth have greater success in the labor market, both with respect to wages and unemployment experience. The key deficiency was in job assignment within the armed forces; minority youth were overrepresented in the less technical, non-combat skills. Military personnel policy is analyzed and recommendations are suggested with respect to minority assistance.
Bibliography Citation
Phillips, Robert L., Paul J. Andrisani and Thomas N. Daymont. "Military Service Effects for Minority Youth." Presented: Boston, MA, Eastern Economic Association Meetings, March 1988.
16. Phillips, Robert L.
Andrisani, Paul J.
Daymont, Thomas N.
Duran, Catherine A.
Analysis of Armed Forces Personnel Policy on Minority Youth
Presented: Southern Management Association Annual Meeting, 1988
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Southern Management Association
Keyword(s): Earnings; Military Service; Minorities; Minorities, Youth; Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

As the largest employer of youth, the personnel policies of the Department of Defense were analyzed with respect to their impact on minorities. The complete cycle was examined; that is, accessions, in-service results, and post-service experience in the labor market. The latter is based upon a pooled cross-section time-series data file from the NLSY. The overall analysis concludes that minority youth: (1) have equal opportunity for accession in the armed forces; (2) do not have an equal chance at technical training; (3) fare just as well as their majority counterparts with respect to pay and promotion; and (4) compare favorably with their nonserving minority counterparts both on in-service pay and benefits as well as post-service earnings and spells of unemployment. Recommendations are made concerning possible policy changes affecting minority job assignment and training.
Bibliography Citation
Phillips, Robert L., Paul J. Andrisani, Thomas N. Daymont and Catherine A. Duran. "Analysis of Armed Forces Personnel Policy on Minority Youth." Presented: Southern Management Association Annual Meeting, 1988.
17. Rumberger, Russell W.
Daymont, Thomas N.
Economic Value of Academic and Vocational Training Acquired in High School
IFG Project Report 82-A23 (Box 6, Folder 3). Stanford, CA: Institute for Research on Educational Finance and Governance, School of Education, Stanford University, 1982.
Also: http://www.oac.cdlib.org/view?docId=tf9489p0kq;query=Rumberger:%20Economic%20Value%20of%20Academic%20and%20Vocational%20Training%20Acquired%20in;style=oac4;doc.view=entire_text#hitNum1
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Institute for Research on Educational Finance and Governance, Stanford University (IFG)
Keyword(s): High School Curriculum; Schooling, Post-secondary; Vocational Education; Vocational Preparation; Wages

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study examines whether differences in high school curricula lead to differences in labor market opportunities for persons who complete 10 to 12 years of schooling and acquire no postsecondary training. Data come from the NLSY and include detailed information on course work taken from high school transcripts. The results show no systematic advantage of one high school curriculum relative to another, although in some instances--for some students and in some areas--vocational preparation produces superior labor market effects to those produced by other curricula.
Bibliography Citation
Rumberger, Russell W. and Thomas N. Daymont. Economic Value of Academic and Vocational Training Acquired in High School. IFG Project Report 82-A23 (Box 6, Folder 3). Stanford, CA: Institute for Research on Educational Finance and Governance, School of Education, Stanford University, 1982..
18. Shaw, Lois B.
Chirikos, Thomas N.
Daymont, Thomas N.
Mercier, Jacqueline
Dual Careers, Volume 5: A Decade of Changes in the Lives of Mature Women
Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1981
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): Attitudes; Health Factors; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Labor Force Participation; Marital Status; Occupations, Non-Traditional; Women; Work Reentry

This report presents an overview of the many changes (economic, social, employment, and family-related) affecting the lives of the Mature Women's cohort (1967-77). Discussed are the problems of labor market reentry, causes of irregular employment patterns, the persistence of occupational segregation, the economic consequences of poor health and marital disruption on the lives of these middle-aged women.
Bibliography Citation
Shaw, Lois B., Thomas N. Chirikos, Thomas N. Daymont and Jacqueline Mercier. Dual Careers, Volume 5: A Decade of Changes in the Lives of Mature Women. Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1981.