Search Results

Author: Morgan, William R.
Resulting in 16 citations.
1. Baker, Paula C.
Carpenter, Susan A.
Crowley, Joan E.
D'Amico, Ronald
Choongsoo, Kim
Morgan, William R.
Wielgosz, John B.
Pathways to the Future, Volume IV: A Report on the National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth Labor Market Experience in 1982
Revised, April 1984. Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1984
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): Comprehensive Employment and Training Act (CETA); Educational Attainment; Employment; High School Dropouts; Job Search; Job Training; Racial Differences; Schooling, Post-secondary; Training, Post-School; Wages, Reservation

The fourth wave of data from the NLSY is analyzed. The nature and consequences of high school employment,the effectiveness of job search and job finding methods among young people, the relationship of race to employment and educational attainment, the long-term effects of participation in government-sponsored employment and training programs, and the determinants and consequences of dropping out of high school in an overeducated society are investigated. A longitudinal study of reservation wages, duration of job search and subsequent wages is presented, based on an empirical econometric analysis.

D'Amico & Baker - Chapter One: The Nature and Consequences of High School Employment. Kim - Chapter Two: A Longitudinal Study of Reservation Wages, Duration of Job Search, and Subsequent Wages: An Empirical Econometric Analysis. Wielgosz & Carpenter - Chapter Three: The Effectiveness of Job Search and Job Finding Methods of Young Americans. Crowley - Chapter Four: Long Term Outcomes of Government-Subsidized Employment and Training Programs. Crowley - Chapter Five: Long Term Outcomes of Goverment-Subsidized Employment and Training Programs. Morgan - Chaper Six: The High School Dropout in an Overeducatedc Society.

Bibliography Citation
Baker, Paula C., Susan A. Carpenter, Joan E. Crowley, Ronald D'Amico, Kim Choongsoo, William R. Morgan and John B. Wielgosz. Pathways to the Future, Volume IV: A Report on the National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth Labor Market Experience in 1982. Revised, April 1984. Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1984.
2. Baker, Paula C.
Crowley, Joan E.
D'Amico, Ronald
Falaris, Evangelos M.
Morgan, William R.
Peters, H. Elizabeth
Willke, Richard
Pathways to the Future, Volume V: A Report on the National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth Labor Market Experience in 1983
Report, Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1985
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): Aid for Families with Dependent Children (AFDC); Behavior; Business Cycles; College Enrollment; Comprehensive Employment and Training Act (CETA); Educational Attainment; Educational Costs; Job Training; Training, Post-School; Transition, School to Work

This report describes the work experience of the nationally-representative sample of 12,000 Americans who were age 14-21 when first interviewed in 1979 and who have been surveyed annually since then. Willke -- Chapter One evaluates outcomes for post-school participants in government employment and training programs with special attention given to selectivity bias. D'Amico & Baker -- Chapter Two describes early labor market differentiation among terminal high school graduates. Morgan -- Chapter Three analyzes business cycle effects on college enrollment behavior. Crowley -- Chapter Four provides a descriptive analysis of welfare patterns among young mothers. Falaris & Peters -- Chapter Five discusses the effect of demographic factors on schooling and entry wages.
Bibliography Citation
Baker, Paula C., Joan E. Crowley, Ronald D'Amico, Evangelos M. Falaris, William R. Morgan, H. Elizabeth Peters and Richard Willke. "Pathways to the Future, Volume V: A Report on the National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth Labor Market Experience in 1983." Report, Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1985.
3. Borus, Michael E.
Crowley, Joan E.
D'Amico, Ronald
Hills, Stephen M.
Morgan, William R.
Pathways to the Future, Volume III: A Final Report on the National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth Labor Market Experience in 1981
Report, Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1983
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): Behavioral Problems; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Educational Aspirations/Expectations; Employment; Job Patterns; Job Training; Private Schools

This report is based on data from the 1979, 1980 and 1981 interviews of the NLSY. Four analytical chapters comprise the volume: HILLS & CROWLEY -- Chapter 1, characteristics that increase job satisfaction among youth are discussed and compared with those of slightly older men and women. CROWLEY -- Chapter 2, the relationship between crime and employment is examined, using a model that combines economic and sociological approaches. D'AMICO -- Chapter 3, examines the effects of two determinants of educational aspirations and delinquent behavior: high school students' participation in their school's informal social system and their expression of positive feelings toward their schools. MORGAN -- Chapter 4, compares the quality of education in public versus private schools.
Bibliography Citation
Borus, Michael E., Joan E. Crowley, Ronald D'Amico, Stephen M. Hills and William R. Morgan. "Pathways to the Future, Volume III: A Final Report on the National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth Labor Market Experience in 1981." Report, Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1983.
4. D'Amico, Ronald
Hills, Stephen M.
Lynch, Lisa M.
Morgan, William R.
Nestel, Gilbert
Olsen, Randall J.
Parsons, Donald O.
Willke, Richard
Pathways to the Future, Volume VI: A Report on the National Longitudinal Surveys of Labor Market Experience of Youth in 1984
Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, January 1986
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): All-Volunteer Force (AVF); Children; Comprehensive Employment and Training Act (CETA); Earnings; Education; Educational Costs; Employment, In-School; Family Resources; Job Training; Labor Market Outcomes

This report describes the work experience of a nationally-representative sample of 12,000 Americans who were age 14-21 when first interviewed in 1979 and who have been surveyed annually since then. Willke - Chapter One examines welfare, education, and labor market outcomes for CETA participants and non-participants. Lynch - Chapter Two aims to identify the influences on the length of time young people are unemployed. Olsen - Chapter Three examines a method for determining the existence and impact of selection bias, which is known to affect outcomes of labor policy discussions depending on how the bias is corrected. Hills - Chapter Four examines the long-run impact of teen-age unemployment on later labor market success. Morgan - Chapter Five examines variation within families in investment of resources in their children's educational and occupational attainment process. D'Amico - Chapter Six adds evidence to other studies showing how pervasive employment is among high school youth. Parsons - Chapter Seven provides information about the on-the-job training provided to young men by private employers. Nestel - Chapter Eight compares the post-school work experience of youth who served in the All-Volunteer Force and those who did not.
Bibliography Citation
D'Amico, Ronald, Stephen M. Hills, Lisa M. Lynch, William R. Morgan, Gilbert Nestel, Randall J. Olsen, Donald O. Parsons and Richard Willke. Pathways to the Future, Volume VI: A Report on the National Longitudinal Surveys of Labor Market Experience of Youth in 1984. Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, January 1986.
5. Morgan, William R.
Business Cycle Effects on College Enrollment Behavior
In: Pathways to the Future, Volume V: A Report on the National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth Labor Market Experience in 1983, P.Baker, ed., Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1985
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): Business Cycles; College Enrollment

Chapter Three analyzes business cycle effects on college enrollment behavior.
Bibliography Citation
Morgan, William R. "Business Cycle Effects on College Enrollment Behavior." In: Pathways to the Future, Volume V: A Report on the National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth Labor Market Experience in 1983, P.Baker, ed., Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1985.
6. Morgan, William R.
Chapter 4: Schooling Effects on Youth from Public, Catholic and Other Private High Schools
In: Pathways to the Future, Volume III: A Final Report on the National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth Labor Market Experience in 1981. Borus, Michael E., ed. Columbus, Ohio: Center for Human Resource Research, 1983.
Also: http://www.eric.ed.gov/PDFS/ED236221.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): Behavioral Problems; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Educational Aspirations/Expectations; Private Schools

Chapter 4 compares the quality of education in public versus private schools.

This report is based on data from the 1979, 1980 and 1981 waves of the National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth Labor Market Experience. These data were collected for a nationally representative sample of 12,686 youth in 1979, 12,141 in 1980 and 12,195 in 1981. This report contains four analytical chapters. Chapter One investigates those characteristics of jobs that make them desirable to youth. In sum, youth jobs that are satisfying should provide security, genuine skill acquisition, and a healthful work environment. Chapter Two examines the relationship between crime and employment using a model that combines economic and sociological approaches. Chapter Three investigates the effects of two determinants of educational aspirations and delinquent behavior: high school students' participation in their school's informal social system (measured by non-class and non-studying time spent at school) and their expression of positive sentiments towards their schools. The final chapter Chapter 4) tests the findings of Coleman, Hoffer and Kilgore who conclude that public secondary schools provide an inferior education relative to private schools. The clear conclusion was that being in the college preparatory curriculum in either public or private secondary school is much more critical than the type of school for maximizing the two educational outcomes. An executive summary is included. (BW)

Bibliography Citation
Morgan, William R. "Chapter 4: Schooling Effects on Youth from Public, Catholic and Other Private High Schools" In: Pathways to the Future, Volume III: A Final Report on the National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth Labor Market Experience in 1981. Borus, Michael E., ed. Columbus, Ohio: Center for Human Resource Research, 1983.
7. Morgan, William R.
Learning and Student Life Quality of Public and Private School Youth
Sociology of Education 56,4 (October 1983): 187-202.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2112548
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Education, Guidance and Counseling; Educational Attainment; Family Background and Culture; High School Curriculum; Hispanics; Peers/Peer influence/Peer relations; Private Schools; Schooling; Vocational Education

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Conclusions from the 1981 public-private schooling report of Coleman, Hoffer and Kilgore are mostly not supported using data from the NLSY. With the exception of a slight gain in verbal achievement for Hispanics in private schools, and a slight gain in vocational achievement for white students in public schools, the sectors do not differ in the amount of learning produced, once the appropriate background and curriculum controls are introduced. Attending Catholic school does slightly raise expected educational attainments. Consistent sector differences do appear in the rated quality of student life--instructional quality, discipline, safety, and peer relations are rated higher in private schools, while learning freedom and job counseling opportunities are rated higher in public schools. The discussion emphasizes the crucial difference between learning and quality of student life as criteria for making policy recommendations.
Bibliography Citation
Morgan, William R. "Learning and Student Life Quality of Public and Private School Youth." Sociology of Education 56,4 (October 1983): 187-202.
8. Morgan, William R.
New Data Available for the National Longitudinal Surveys
Presented: Montreal, QC, Annual Meetings of the American Educational Research Association, 1983
Cohort(s): NLS General
Publisher: American Educational Research Association
Keyword(s): Divorce; Education; Marital Stability; Marital Status; NLS Description; Tests and Testing

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper describes the content of the NLSY which is of special relevance to educational researchers. This includes the educational section of the annual interview schedule, the school questionnaire, the ASVAB test, and the school transcript data. A brief tabular description by age and educational attainment is presented.
Bibliography Citation
Morgan, William R. "New Data Available for the National Longitudinal Surveys." Presented: Montreal, QC, Annual Meetings of the American Educational Research Association, 1983.
9. Morgan, William R.
Quantity of Learning and Quality of Life for Public and Private High School Youth
In: Youth and the Labor Market. M.E. Borus, ed. Kalamazoo, MI: Upjohn Institute, 1984: pp. 111-156
Cohort(s): NLSY79, Young Men
Publisher: W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research
Keyword(s): Education; High School Students

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Bibliography Citation
Morgan, William R. "Quantity of Learning and Quality of Life for Public and Private High School Youth" In: Youth and the Labor Market. M.E. Borus, ed. Kalamazoo, MI: Upjohn Institute, 1984: pp. 111-156
10. Morgan, William R.
Returning to School at Midlife: Mature Women with Educational Careers
In: Midlife Women at Work: A Fifteen Year Perspective. L.B. Shaw, ed. Lexington, MA: Lexington Books, 1986: pp. 51-72
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: Jossey-Bass
Keyword(s): Career Patterns; Women's Education

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Bibliography Citation
Morgan, William R. "Returning to School at Midlife: Mature Women with Educational Careers" In: Midlife Women at Work: A Fifteen Year Perspective. L.B. Shaw, ed. Lexington, MA: Lexington Books, 1986: pp. 51-72
11. Morgan, William R.
Sibling Influences on the Career Plans of Male and Female Youth
Report, Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1983
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): Family Structure; Occupational Aspirations; Pairs (also see Siblings); Self-Reporting; Siblings; Transition, School to Work

Using as a starting point Olneck's 1977 finding that the adult earnings of brothers are more similar than their common origin status would lead us to expect, this report analyzes the effects of siblings on career aspirations. Data from 5715 respondents who form 2419 sibling groups of two, three or four are used to see how their self- reported career aspirations influenced each other from 1979 to 1982. The principal finding is that brothers, and brothers only, reinforce one another's occupational aspirations during the critical years of occupational identity formation when youth are beginning to make the transition to full-time employment. The apparent absence of a similar socialization mechanism between sisters may be one further hidden barrier to the career development of females.
Bibliography Citation
Morgan, William R. "Sibling Influences on the Career Plans of Male and Female Youth." Report, Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1983.
12. Morgan, William R.
The Analysis of NLS Youth in Public and Private Schools: Response to Coleman and Hoffer
Sociology of Education 57,2 (April 1984): 122-128.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2112634
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Educational Attainment; Private Schools; Research Methodology

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Morgan responds to Coleman and Hoffer's critique of his analysis. Contrary to their claims, his analysis used weighted data from a fully representative sample of adequate size. Moreover, the model specification Coleman and Hoffer advocated was in fact estimated and reported in the article. Additional information on the NLSY is reported for the sake of educational researchers considering use of the data.
Bibliography Citation
Morgan, William R. "The Analysis of NLS Youth in Public and Private Schools: Response to Coleman and Hoffer." Sociology of Education 57,2 (April 1984): 122-128.
13. Morgan, William R.
Parnes, Herbert S.
Less, Lawrence L.
Leisure Activities and Social Networks
In: Retirement Among American Men. H.S. Parnes, ed. Lexington, MA: Lexington Books, 1985: pp. 119-145
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: Jossey-Bass
Keyword(s): Leisure; Retirement

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Bibliography Citation
Morgan, William R., Herbert S. Parnes and Lawrence L. Less. "Leisure Activities and Social Networks" In: Retirement Among American Men. H.S. Parnes, ed. Lexington, MA: Lexington Books, 1985: pp. 119-145
14. Morgan, William R.
Sun, Rongjun
Bootstrap Theory of American Social Mobility: Are Resilient Children a Fantasy?
Presented: Atlanta, Ga, American Sociological Association Annual Meetings, August 2003
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Children, Academic Development; Children, Poverty; Comparison Group (Reference group); Modeling, Growth Curve/Latent Trajectory Analysis; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Variables, Independent - Covariate

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Social mobility for persons reared in urban neighborhoods of concentrated poverty often occurs without the social stimulation usually encompassed in conventional understandings of significant others' influence. In this longitudinal case study of 613 children living in Cleveland's high poverty neighborhoods, we examine the impact on educational achievement growth and behavior problem decline of the children's capacity for resiliency and the opportunity for temporary residence with their mothers in a uniquely constructed total social environment, a therapeutic community for women addicted to crack cocaine. After reviewing the extensive literature on children's resiliency, we develop a new instrument to measure the capacity for resiliency, a multidimensional construct comprising observable cognitive, moral, and relational strengths. We use hierarchical growth modeling to estimate the effects for children of this newly measured capacity for resiliency and the treatment setting while controlling for observable covariates of the mother and child and unobserved family heterogeneity and auto-correlated measurement error across the four annual time points of the test observations. Increases in math and reading achievement and a decline in behavior problems were significantly related to the child's capacity for resiliency. Increases in math, reading, and vocabulary achievement were significantly related to time spent living with mother in the therapeutic community. After demonstrating the likely generalizability of our findings beyond the treatment sample of children and mothers, we examine reasons for the therapeutic community's impact on these children. NOTE: The 1992 NLSY79 Child file was used as the basis for a comparison group in this study. Estimates are drawn from the Child-Mother Supplement of the 1992 round of the National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth (Center for Human Resource Research 1998). The weighted national sample was restricted to all sampled NLSY children aged 4-13 and their mothers (n = 4709), and the urban poverty subsample on all in this age bracket who were residing in the nonsuburban districts of metropolitan areas and had family incomes in the prior year that fell below the federal poverty line (n = 636).
Bibliography Citation
Morgan, William R. and Rongjun Sun. "Bootstrap Theory of American Social Mobility: Are Resilient Children a Fantasy?" Presented: Atlanta, Ga, American Sociological Association Annual Meetings, August 2003.
15. Parnes, Herbert S.
Crowley, Joan E.
Haurin, R. Jean
Less, Lawrence L.
Mott, Frank L.
Morgan, William R.
Nestel, Gilbert
Retirement Among American Men
Lexington, MA: Lexington Books, 1985
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: Jossey-Bass
Keyword(s): Early Retirement; Earnings; Education; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Job Satisfaction; Life Satisfaction; Mortality; Retirees; Retirement

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Fifteen years of data from a nationally representative sample of men age 45-59 in 1966 show that by 1981 most had retired. One third of all retirements and almost half of those by black men were caused by poor health; fewer than five percent of retirees were forced from their jobs by mandatory plans; about 10 percent of retirees were forced from their jobs by mandatory plans; about 10 percent left the labor market in discouragement due to labor market adversity. Most retirements, however, are voluntary, and most take place before age 65. Trends in mortality differentials show that general improvements in health and medical care have benefited all groups, especially the chronically ill. The data highlight a trend toward early retirement in the 1960s and 1970s and show that only 30 percent of retirements actually took place at the age men expected when asked at age 59. Economic well being, leisure activities and social interactions, psychological and physical well being are examined. The experience of the minority who continue to work beyond the normal retirement age is also analyzed.

Introduction and overview / Herbert S. Parnes and Lawrence J. Less -- Factors affecting mortality in the years surrounding retirement / Frank L. Mott and R. Jean Haurin -- The volume and pattern of retirements, 1966-1981 / Herbert S. Parnes and Lawrence J. Less -- Retirement expectation and the timing of retirement / Gilbert Nestel -- Economic well-being in retirement / Herbert S. Parnes and Lawrence J. Less -- Leisure activities and social networks / William R. Morgan, Herbert S. Parnes, and Lawrence J. Less -- Longitudinal effects of retirement on men's psychological and physical well-being / Joan E. Crowley -- Shunning retirement : the experience of full-time workers / Herbert S. Parnes and Lawrence J. Less.

Bibliography Citation
Parnes, Herbert S., Joan E. Crowley, R. Jean Haurin, Lawrence L. Less, Frank L. Mott, William R. Morgan and Gilbert Nestel. Retirement Among American Men. Lexington, MA: Lexington Books, 1985.
16. Shaw, Lois B.
D'Amico, Ronald
Gagen, Mary G.
Gitter, Robert J.
Haurin, Donald R.
Morgan, William R.
Mott, Frank L.
Peters, Elizabeth
Dual Careers, Volume 6: Fifteen Year Report on the National Longitudinal Surveys Mature Women's Cohort
Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1985
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): Education; Employment; Family Constraints; Job Patterns; Marital Disruption; Marriage; Racial Differences

Fifteen years of data from the NLS cohort of Mature Women are analyzed. Chapter one describes the extent of the decreasing family responsibilities and increasing labor market involvement for these women over the fifteen-year period. Chapter two explores the employment patterns of white and black women following the birth of their first child. Chapter three examines the degree of responsibility given to women age 45 to 59 for the pay and promotion decisions of others. Chapter four describes the education the women received between 1967 and 1982, and chapter five examines the extent to which they increased their labor market involvement as a result of family disruptions or husband's employment or disability. Chapter six describes the factors that determine women's early withdrawal from the labor market. Chapter seven illustrates the usefulness of hazard rate models in exploring the transition from divorce to remarriage and finds a striking difference in the mean duration to remarriage between whites and non-whites. Chapter eight focuses on the retirement plans and expected pension of white and black middle aged women.
Bibliography Citation
Shaw, Lois B., Ronald D'Amico, Mary G. Gagen, Robert J. Gitter, Donald R. Haurin, William R. Morgan, Frank L. Mott and Elizabeth Peters. Dual Careers, Volume 6: Fifteen Year Report on the National Longitudinal Surveys Mature Women's Cohort. Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1985.