Search Results

Source: Research on Aging
Resulting in 19 citations.
1. Beck, Scott Herman
Determinants of Labor Force Activity Among Retired Men
Research on Aging 7,2 (June 1985): 251-280.
Also: http://roa.sagepub.com/content/7/2/251.abstract
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Health Factors; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Income; Labor Force Participation; Retirement; Work Attitudes

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Data from the NLS of Older Men for 1966 to 1981 were used to identify factors affecting labor force participation after retirement. Factors included in the analysis were social and demographic characteristics and mediating variables such as retirement benefits, attitudes toward work and retirement, and health status. Three retirement patterns were identified: complete retirement, partial retirement, and rejection of retirement. Over two-thirds of the sample were fully retired; about 20 percent were partially retired; and about 10 percent returned to full- time work. The models used in the logistic multiple regression analysis predicted rejection of retirement fairly successfully but were not as useful in predicting partial retirement. Retirement income and health were the most important factors influencing work after retirement. Disabilities or poor health forced a substantial minority of men to remain completely retired, while very low retirement benefits forced some retired to work full-time or part-time. The propensity to work after retirement varied somewhat by occupational groups, but these differences were not large and generally were explained by other factors related to occupation, such as the institutional arrangements of work and the unemployment rate in the local labor market. Attitudes toward work were reasonably important determinants of labor force participation but were less significant than the constraints of poor health and low retirement income. [AgeLine]
Bibliography Citation
Beck, Scott Herman. "Determinants of Labor Force Activity Among Retired Men." Research on Aging 7,2 (June 1985): 251-280.
2. Beck, Scott Herman
Position in the Economic Structure and Unexpected Retirement
Research on Aging 5,2 (June 1983): 197-216.
Also: http://roa.sagepub.com/content/5/2/197.abstract
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Duncan Index; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Industrial Sector; Occupational Status; Pensions; Retirement; Retirement History Study; Self-Employed Workers

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

While some workers retire when and how they planned, others leave the labor force unexpectedly and unprepared for retirement. The purpose of this research was to investigate whether certain indicators of position in the economic structure affect the probability of leaving the labor force when planned. The results of the logistic multiple regression analysis revealed that all three indicators of economic position, occupational status, industrial sector and self-employment, had significant net effects on the dichotomous dependent variable, expected/unexpected retirement. These effects were mediated, to varying degrees, by pension coverage and health status, the former increasing the chances of retiring when planned, the latter decreasing the probability of retiring when planned.
Bibliography Citation
Beck, Scott Herman. "Position in the Economic Structure and Unexpected Retirement." Research on Aging 5,2 (June 1983): 197-216.
3. Campbell, Richard T.
Mutran, Elizabeth
Parker, Robert N.
Longitudinal Design and Longitudinal Analysis: A Comparison of Three Approaches
Research on Aging 8,4 (December 1986): 480-502.
Also: http://roa.sagepub.com/content/8/4/480.abstract
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Age and Ageing; Research Methodology; Retirement

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper compares three methods of analyzing data in longitudinal studies of aging: multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA), the LISREL structural equation method, and event history analysis. The basic concepts of each approach are explained, and each technique is applied to data from the National Longitudinal Surveys of Labor Market Experience to illustrate its use in analyzing factors affecting the retirement decision. The results indicate that each approach has a particular conceptualization of development and change and particular design requirements, and therefore each is appropriate under different data collection regimes. MANOVA is ideal for comparisons of groups over time because its tests are precise and unambiguous, but it does not provide information about the process by which people withdraw from the labor force. The LISREL path analytic approach deals well with the concept of an intervening variable and permits nonadditivity and nonlinearity, but it does not deal well with causal contingencies or permit tests of alternative sequences. Event history or transition models requires exact information on the timing of transitions, and it can be used to estimate a number of models under various assumptions about the form of the underlying transition rate. [AgeLine]
Bibliography Citation
Campbell, Richard T., Elizabeth Mutran and Robert N. Parker. "Longitudinal Design and Longitudinal Analysis: A Comparison of Three Approaches." Research on Aging 8,4 (December 1986): 480-502.
4. Chirikos, Thomas N.
Nestel, Gilbert
Occupation, Impaired Health, and the Functional Capacity of Men to Continue Working
Research on Aging 11,2 (June 1989): 174-205.
Also: http://roa.sagepub.com/content/11/2/174.abstract
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Disability; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Markov chain / Markov model; Mortality; Retirement

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

An "Erratum" appears in Research on Aging 11,4 (December 1989): 517. See, http://roa.sagepub.com/content/11/4/517.full.pdf+html

This paper tested hypotheses about the influence of physically demanding work and impaired health of older men on the ability to delay retirement. A continuous-time Markov model of retirement, disability, and death was used; the parameters were estimated with panel data covering a period of 17 years from the National Longitudinal Survey (H. Parnes, 1975) of Labor Market Experience of Older Men. Findings show that health-related physical conditions play an important role in determining the ability of male workers to delay retirement and in increasing the potential for some unintended toll in advancing the age of retirement. A second major conclusion is that whatever the toll exacted by policies designed to advance the age of retirement, it is unlikely to fall disproportionately on only some occupational groups. An "Erratum" appears in a subsequent issue which reports an error in the original article. On pages 182 and 203 (of the original article), several equations have been corrected. [APA]

Bibliography Citation
Chirikos, Thomas N. and Gilbert Nestel. "Occupation, Impaired Health, and the Functional Capacity of Men to Continue Working." Research on Aging 11,2 (June 1989): 174-205.
5. Hardy, Melissa A.
Job Characteristics and Health: Differential Impact on Benefit Entitlement
Research on Aging 4,4 (December 1982): 457-478.
Also: http://roa.sagepub.com/content/4/4/457.abstract
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Assets; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Income; Labor Force Participation; Retirement; Self-Employed Workers

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper investigates the influence on eligibility criteria, current labor force participation, characteristics of current or last job, health, and age on the utilization of retirement benefits. Respondents were white males drawn from the 1975 wave of the National Longitudinal Survey of Older Men. Estimates from multinomial logit models indicate that more highly educated workers and self-employed workers were more likely than other workers to be employed at older ages, one reason being their flexibility in defining retirement options. Self-employed workers and workers with low job tenure and low net assets were likely to combine benefit income and earnings in a given year. Workers with reported health limitations appeared to be predisposed to retire when eligible for benefits, with such workers aged 63 and over more likely to be dependent on Social Security benefits only. [AgeLine]
Bibliography Citation
Hardy, Melissa A. "Job Characteristics and Health: Differential Impact on Benefit Entitlement." Research on Aging 4,4 (December 1982): 457-478.
6. Hayward, Mark D.
Hardy, Melissa A.
Early Retirement Processes Among Older Men: Occupational Differences
Research on Aging 7,4 (December 1985): 491-515.
Also: http://roa.sagepub.com/content/7/4/491.abstract
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Age and Ageing; Job Requirements; Occupations; Retirement

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study examines the influence of the occupational context on early retirement, focusing on the ways in which the nature of work constrains early retirement processes. Using data from the NLS Older Men and the Dictionary of Occupational Titles, a model of early retirement is estimated within occupational job families where a job family is a cluster of occupations grouped according to major task dimensions. The findings indicate that the effects of certain traditional determinants of early retirement vary substantially across occupations, demonstrating that the labor force opportunities of older men are defined within an occupational context, and that the impact of individual and job characteristics relevant to the early retirement decision are shaped by the nature of work.
Bibliography Citation
Hayward, Mark D. and Melissa A. Hardy. "Early Retirement Processes Among Older Men: Occupational Differences." Research on Aging 7,4 (December 1985): 491-515.
7. Mossakowski, Krysia N.
Dissecting the Influence of Race, Ethnicity, and Socioeconomic Status on Mental Health in Young Adulthood
Research on Aging 30,6 (November 2008): 649-671.
Also: http://roa.sagepub.com/content/30/6/649.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Depression (see also CESD); Ethnic Differences; Family Background; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Life Course; Poverty; Racial Differences; Socioeconomic Status (SES); Wealth

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Studies have provided contradictory findings about the influence of race and ethnicity on mental health. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (1979 to 1992), this study examines the extent to which multiple dimensions of past and present socioeconomic status explain the influence of race and ethnicity on depression in young adulthood. Results indicate that Blacks and Hispanics have significantly higher levels of depressive symptoms than Whites, which supports social stress theory These racial and ethnic differences are partially explained by family background and wealth, and substantially explained by the duration of poverty across 13 years of the transition to adulthood. Moreover, the robust depressive effect of past poverty duration is independent of present socioeconomic status and family background. Overall, this study was inspired by the life-course perspective and highlights the importance of wealth and histories of poverty for understanding racial and ethnic mental health disparities among young adults in the United States. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

Copyright of Research on Aging is the property of Sage Publications Inc. and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts)

Bibliography Citation
Mossakowski, Krysia N. "Dissecting the Influence of Race, Ethnicity, and Socioeconomic Status on Mental Health in Young Adulthood." Research on Aging 30,6 (November 2008): 649-671.
8. Mueller, Charles W.
Mutran, Elizabeth
Age Discrimination in Earnings in a Dual-Economy Market
Research on Aging 11,4 (December 1989): 492-507.
Also: http://roa.sagepub.com/content/11/4/492.abstract
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Age and Ageing; Discrimination, Age; Dual Economic Theory; Earnings; Simultaneity; Wages

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper examined the age-earnings relationship for a panel of older workers, simultaneously controlling for human capital variables and other variables related to both age and earnings. Data were obtained from the NLS of Older Men. The sample analyzed included men who were 45 to 55 in 1966 and who reported earnings in both 1966 and 1976. The investigation took into account that the economy is divided structurally into sectors that are contexts in which individual characteristics, such as age, are differentially evaluated and rewarded. It also examined the age-earnings relationship within and across the core and periphery economic sectors. Age-based discrimination was found for core-sector but not periphery-sector workers, and it became more prevalent as workers grew older. Results demonstrate that the 1967 Age Discrimination in Employment Act did not eliminate age discrimination in wages. These findings are discussed in light of claims that older workers, especially in the core sector, have lost their power in the work place. [AgeLine]
Bibliography Citation
Mueller, Charles W. and Elizabeth Mutran. "Age Discrimination in Earnings in a Dual-Economy Market." Research on Aging 11,4 (December 1989): 492-507.
9. Parnes, Herbert S.
From the Middle to the Later Years: Longitudinal Studies of the Pre- and Postretirement Experience of Men
Research on Aging 3,4 (December 1981): 387-402.
Also: http://roa.sagepub.com/content/3/4/387.full.pdf+html
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Age and Ageing; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Job Satisfaction; Mortality; NLS Description; Retirement

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The NLS data base is briefly described and the findings of several recent studies based on the waves of interviews conducted between 1966 and 1976 are summarized in order to illustrate the variety of subjects relating to aging that can be addressed with the data.
Bibliography Citation
Parnes, Herbert S. "From the Middle to the Later Years: Longitudinal Studies of the Pre- and Postretirement Experience of Men." Research on Aging 3,4 (December 1981): 387-402.
10. Pavalko, Eliza K.
Henderson, Kathryn A.
Combining Care Work and Paid Work: Do Workplace Policies Make a Difference?
Research on Aging 28,3 (May 2006): 359-374.
Also: http://roa.sagepub.com/cgi/reprint/28/3/359.pdf
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Benefits; Caregivers, Adult Children; Employment; Leave, Family or Maternity/Paternity; Women

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Demographic shifts mean that workers will increasingly face challenges of caring for ill or disabled family members. The authors use data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Young Women to assess whether employed women are more likely to leave the labor force when they start care work and whether access to workplace policies alters these patterns. They found that, as with earlier cohorts, employed women are more likely to leave the labor force after they start care work. Workers in jobs that provide access to flexible hours, unpaid family leave, and paid sick or vacation days are more likely to remain employed and maintain work hours over a two-year period, but access to job benefits has little impact on women's distress. Although most policies do not provide additional benefits for employed caregivers than for other workers, unpaid family leave does increase their employment retention.
Bibliography Citation
Pavalko, Eliza K. and Kathryn A. Henderson. "Combining Care Work and Paid Work: Do Workplace Policies Make a Difference?" Research on Aging 28,3 (May 2006): 359-374.
11. Pitcher, Brian L.
Spykerman, Bryan R.
Gazi-Tabatabaie, Mahmood
Stability of Perceived Personal Control for Older Black and White Men
Research on Aging 9,2 (June 1987): 200-225.
Also: http://roa.sagepub.com/content/9/2/200.abstract
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Behavior; Control; Internal-External Attitude; LISREL; Psychological Effects; Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The recent emergence of the life-span perspective in sociopsychological research has increased attention to the issue of stability versus change in adult personality and behavior. This study uses data on Older Men from the NLS and LISREL statistical procedures to investigate the structural invariance over time, the level stability, and normative stability of perceived personal control within subsamples of blacks and whites.
Bibliography Citation
Pitcher, Brian L., Bryan R. Spykerman and Mahmood Gazi-Tabatabaie. "Stability of Perceived Personal Control for Older Black and White Men." Research on Aging 9,2 (June 1987): 200-225.
12. Pitcher, Brian L.
Stinner, William F.
Toney, Michael B.
Patterns of Migration Propensity for Black and White American Men: Evidence from a Cohort Analysis
Research on Aging 7,1 (March 1985): 94-120.
Also: http://roa.sagepub.com/content/7/1/94.abstract
Cohort(s): Older Men, Young Men
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Age and Ageing; Migration; Racial Differences; Simultaneity

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study investigates age, period, and cohort patterns of migration for blacks and whites by applying cohort analysis models to panel data from the Young Men and Older Men samples of the National Longitudinal Surveys. The simultaneous inclusion of these four variables represents an important refinement of previous studies that have considered only one or two of them at a time. Principal findings are that age, period, and cohort have independent effects on migration and that the effects differ markedly by race. These findings have significant implications for the development of causal models of migration.
Bibliography Citation
Pitcher, Brian L., William F. Stinner and Michael B. Toney. "Patterns of Migration Propensity for Black and White American Men: Evidence from a Cohort Analysis." Research on Aging 7,1 (March 1985): 94-120.
13. Spence, Naomi J.
The Long-Term Consequences of Childbearing
Research on Aging 30,6 (November 2008): 722-751.
Also: http://roa.sagepub.com/content/30/6/722.abstract
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Age at Birth; Childbearing; Depression (see also CESD); Health, Mental; Pregnancy and Pregnancy Outcomes; Racial Differences; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Growing evidence points to relationships between patterns of childbearing and health outcomes for mothers; yet a need remains to clarify these relationships over the long term and to understand the underlying mechanisms. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Mature Women (N = 1,608), the author found that the long-term consequences of childbearing vary by health outcome. Early childbearing is associated with higher risk of activities of daily living limitations at ages 65 to 83, though effects appear stronger among White than Black mothers until socioeconomic status (SES) is controlled. Early childbearing is also associated with greater levels of depressive symptomatology, though this association is mediated by SES and health. Late childbearing is associated with more depressive symptoms net of early life and current SES, child proximity and support, and physical health. Finally, no significant effects of high parity are found. These findings emphasize the need to better understand the mechanisms linking childbearing histories to later physical and psychological well-being. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

Copyright of Research on Aging is the property of Sage Publications Inc. and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts)

Bibliography Citation
Spence, Naomi J. "The Long-Term Consequences of Childbearing." Research on Aging 30,6 (November 2008): 722-751.
14. Stinner, William F.
Byun, Yongchan
Paita, Luis
Disability and Living Arrangements Among Elderly American Men
Research on Aging 12,3 (September 1990): 339-363.
Also: http://roa.sagepub.com/content/12/3/339.abstract
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Disability; Household Structure; Residence

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Four models that posit alternative ways in which disability might affect coresidence with adult relatives are discussed and tested for a pooled sample of 2,623 men (ages 65-74) drawn from the 1976 and 1981 rounds of the NLS of Older Men using descriptive and logistic regression techniques. Men with multiple disabling conditions, but not a single disability, were more likely to be coresiding with adult relatives than were non-disabled men, independent of a set selected background characteristics. Results provide general support for a model focusing on assistance norms, and it is suggested that the absence of a spouse reinforces this pattern. [Sociological Abstracts, Inc.]
Bibliography Citation
Stinner, William F., Yongchan Byun and Luis Paita. "Disability and Living Arrangements Among Elderly American Men." Research on Aging 12,3 (September 1990): 339-363.
15. Stinner, William F.
Khosroshahin, Mehdi
Selectivity Among Nonmetropolitan-Bound Male Migrants in the Middle and Later Years
Research on Aging 7,3 (September 1985): 472-488.
Also: http://roa.sagepub.com/content/7/3/472.abstract
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Age and Ageing; Life Cycle Research; Migration; Rural/Urban Differences; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Middle-aged and elderly individuals have played a prominent role in the non-metropolitan turnaround. The data for this study are drawn from the Older Men cohort of the NLS, and the analysis is focused on a pooled sample of two- year migration intervals extending from 1967-1975. Nonmetropolitan-bound migrants do not differ substantially from metropolitan nonmigrants, but differences observed are along life-cycle lines. In contrast, metropolitan to nonmetropolitan migrants differ from nonmetropolitan nonmigrants on both socioeconomic status and life-cycle attributes.
Bibliography Citation
Stinner, William F. and Mehdi Khosroshahin. "Selectivity Among Nonmetropolitan-Bound Male Migrants in the Middle and Later Years." Research on Aging 7,3 (September 1985): 472-488.
16. Stinner, William F.
Pitcher, Brian L.
Toney, Michael B.
Discriminators of Migration Propensity Among Black and White Men in the Middle and Later Years
Research on Aging 7,4 (December 1985): 535-562.
Also: http://roa.sagepub.com/content/7/4/535.abstract
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Age and Ageing; Migration

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The objective of this research is to increase our understanding of racial variations in the correlates of migration propensity among men passing through their middle and later years. An analytical model is developed around environmental disamenities, socioeconomic bonds, personal resources, and age. The results suggest the importance of determining the extent to which selected variables differentially discriminate migrants from nonmigrants dependent on race.
Bibliography Citation
Stinner, William F., Brian L. Pitcher and Michael B. Toney. "Discriminators of Migration Propensity Among Black and White Men in the Middle and Later Years." Research on Aging 7,4 (December 1985): 535-562.
17. Walsemann, Katrina Michelle
Geronimus, Arline T.
Gee, Gilbert C.
Accumulating Disadvantage over the Life Course: Evidence from a Longitudinal Study Investigating the Relationship Between Educational Advantage in Youth and Health in Middle Age
Research on Aging 30,2 (March 2008): 169-199.
Also: http://roa.sagepub.com/content/30/2/169.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Education; Educational Attainment; Ethnic Differences; Health Care; Life Course; Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Recent studies suggest the importance of examining cumulative risk or advantage as potential predictors of health over the life course. Researchers investigating the cumulative health effects of education, however, have mainly conceptualized education in years or degrees, often disregarding educational quality and access to educational opportunities that may place individuals on divergent academic trajectories. We investigate whether educational advantages in youth are associated with an individual's health trajectory. We develop a novel index of educational advantage and employ random-intercept modeling using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. A widening health disparity was found in adulthood between respondents with greater and those with fewer educational advantages in youth. Furthermore, among respondents with few educational advantages, Blacks experience a greater health burden as they age compared to Whites and Hispanics. These results suggest that differential access to educational advantages during youth may contribute to persisting health disparities in adulthood. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

Copyright of Research on Aging is the property of Sage Publications Inc. and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts)

Bibliography Citation
Walsemann, Katrina Michelle, Arline T. Geronimus and Gilbert C. Gee. "Accumulating Disadvantage over the Life Course: Evidence from a Longitudinal Study Investigating the Relationship Between Educational Advantage in Youth and Health in Middle Age." Research on Aging 30,2 (March 2008): 169-199.
18. Wolfe, Joseph D.
Age, Cohort, and Social Change: Parental and Spousal Education and White Women's Health Limitations From 1967 to 2012
Research on Aging 41,2 (February 2019): 186-210.
Also: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0164027518800486
Cohort(s): Mature Women, NLSY79, Young Women
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Educational Attainment; Health, Chronic Conditions; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

A large body of research finds that the association between educational attainment and health is at historic highs for White women. Rapid changes in labor force participation, access to high-paying jobs, and gender attitudes have radically altered the meaning of education for women's lives and their dependence on the socioeconomic attainments of their families. Drawing on three nationally representative longitudinal surveys conducted from 1967 to 2012, this study examines how personal, parental, and spousal attainments contribute to the widening education gap in health for successive cohorts of White women (N = 8,405). Overall, the health of women did not change substantially across cohorts, but results did uncover cohort differences among low-educated women that were linked to parental and spousal educational attainments and personal earnings. These findings confirm growing educational inequalities in health and demonstrate the importance of historical context and family attainments when examining cohort variation in the education-health relationship.
Bibliography Citation
Wolfe, Joseph D. "Age, Cohort, and Social Change: Parental and Spousal Education and White Women's Health Limitations From 1967 to 2012 ." Research on Aging 41,2 (February 2019): 186-210.
19. Zagorsky, Jay L.
Is Obesity as Dangerous to Your Wealth as to Your Health?
Research on Aging 26,1 (January 2004): 130-152.
Also: http://roa.sagepub.com/content/26/1/130.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Body Mass Index (BMI); Health Factors; Inheritance; Obesity; Wealth

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Examined the effects of obesity on the wealth of middle-aged baby boomers. Data were obtained from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, which began in 1979; analysis focuses on data from 1985 through 2000, when 7,699 participants (mean age 38.7) remained in the study. It was found that the net worth of the obese was roughly half that of those with normal body mass. As young baby boomers aged, peak net worth slowly shifted toward those with lower body mass. Boomers with a body mass index (BMI) of 22 in 1985 held the most net worth, but by 2000 the peak had shifted to those with a BMI of 17. From 1985 to 2000, for every one-point BMI increase, net worth fell an average of $1,000, holding other factors like income constant. Surprisingly, part of the reason BMI is inversely related to net worth is because lighter people receive more inheritance than heavier individuals. (MM) (AgeLine Database, copyright 2004 AARP, all rights reserved)
Bibliography Citation
Zagorsky, Jay L. "Is Obesity as Dangerous to Your Wealth as to Your Health?" Research on Aging 26,1 (January 2004): 130-152.