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Author: Henderson, Kathryn A.
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Henderson, Kathryn A.
Do Workplace Structures Matter? A Cross-Cohort Analysis of Mothers' Labor Market Participation and Choice of Child Care Arrangements
Ph.D. Dissertation, Indiana University, 2005. DAI-A 66/07, p. 2737, Jan 2006
Cohort(s): NLSY79, Young Women
Publisher: ProQuest Dissertations & Theses (PQDT)
Keyword(s): Benefits, Insurance; Child Care; Employment; Employment, Part-Time; Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA); Labor Force Participation; Maternal Employment; Part-Time Work; Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Among the most significant social trend of the second half of the twentieth century is the involvement of women, especially mothers, in the labor market. Relatedly, patterns of childcare arrangements have changed dramatically during this time period. Research establishes many factors including gender ideology, career aspirations, and occupational structures affect women's choices regarding employment and childcare. However, the relationship between workplace structures, specifically, access to workplace benefits, and maternal employment and childcare behaviors requires further specification. We also know little about how changes in women's jobs affect increases in maternal employment and in non-maternal childcare arrangements. This research uses two cohorts of the National Longitudinal Surveys of Labor Market Experience to examine the impact of workplace structures, including access to workplace policies, on mother's labor force participation and choice of childcare arrangements. Results identify significant cohort differences in the likelihood of employment following childbirth. Access to benefits, namely medical insurance and company provided childcare, increase the odds of employment and account for variation between the two cohorts. There are not significant differences in the likelihood of working full-time versus part-time among employed mothers. Yet workplace benefits increase the odds of full-time hours. The more recent cohort of women is more likely to use maternal childcare than relative care. However, once employment status is considered, there are not significant cohort differences in the probability of using maternal care over non-relative care. Among employed women, access to flexible hours and company provided childcare do not significantly impact childcare arrangements, but workplace characteristics such as hours worked and job shift, lead to greater use of non-maternal child care. Implications for women's labor market participation and the efficacy of family friendly policies for narrowing the gender gap in employment behaviors are discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Henderson, Kathryn A. Do Workplace Structures Matter? A Cross-Cohort Analysis of Mothers' Labor Market Participation and Choice of Child Care Arrangements. Ph.D. Dissertation, Indiana University, 2005. DAI-A 66/07, p. 2737, Jan 2006.
2. Pavalko, Eliza K.
Henderson, Kathryn A.
Combining Care Work and Paid Work: Do Workplace Policies Make a Difference?
Research on Aging 28,3 (May 2006): 359-374.
Also: http://roa.sagepub.com/cgi/reprint/28/3/359.pdf
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Benefits; Caregivers, Adult Children; Employment; Leave, Family or Maternity/Paternity; Women

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Demographic shifts mean that workers will increasingly face challenges of caring for ill or disabled family members. The authors use data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Young Women to assess whether employed women are more likely to leave the labor force when they start care work and whether access to workplace policies alters these patterns. They found that, as with earlier cohorts, employed women are more likely to leave the labor force after they start care work. Workers in jobs that provide access to flexible hours, unpaid family leave, and paid sick or vacation days are more likely to remain employed and maintain work hours over a two-year period, but access to job benefits has little impact on women's distress. Although most policies do not provide additional benefits for employed caregivers than for other workers, unpaid family leave does increase their employment retention.
Bibliography Citation
Pavalko, Eliza K. and Kathryn A. Henderson. "Combining Care Work and Paid Work: Do Workplace Policies Make a Difference?" Research on Aging 28,3 (May 2006): 359-374.