Search Results

Author: Wolfe, Joseph D.
Resulting in 18 citations.
1. Bauldry, Shawn
Wolfe, Joseph D.
Adult Children's Education and Parent Mortality: Exploring Mechanisms
Presented: Austin TX, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2019
Cohort(s): Mature Women, Older Men
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Educational Attainment; Mortality; Parental Influences; Smoking (see Cigarette Use); Transfers, Financial

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

A series of recent studies find a robust association between adult children's education and parent health. Three mechanisms are thought to underlie the observed associations: the provision of direct care, the transfer of financial resources, and the influence on health behaviors, in particular smoking, of parents. This research draws on data from the National Longitudinal Surveys of Older Men and Mature Women and causal mediation models to test the three mechanisms.
Bibliography Citation
Bauldry, Shawn and Joseph D. Wolfe. "Adult Children's Education and Parent Mortality: Exploring Mechanisms." Presented: Austin TX, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2019.
2. Cockerham, William C.
Wolfe, Joseph D.
Bauldry, Shawn
Health Lifestyles in Late Middle Age
Research on Aging 42,1 (January 2020): 34-46.
Also: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0164027519884760
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Health, Chronic Conditions; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Nutritional Status/Nutrition/Consumption Behaviors; Physical Activity (see also Exercise); Smoking (see Cigarette Use)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

A growing body of work identifies distinct health lifestyles among children, adolescents, and young adults and documents important social correlates. This study contributes to that line of research by identifying the health lifestyles of U.S. adults entering late middle age, assessing structural predictors of membership in different health lifestyles in this understudied age-group, and examining net associations between health lifestyles, chronic conditions, and physical health. The data come from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 50+ Health Module. The analysis is based on respondents who answered the 50+ Health Module in 2008, 2010, 2012, or 2014 (N = 7,234). The results confirm similar relationships between health lifestyles and structural factors like class, gender, and race that prior studies observe and also reveal a unique pattern of associations between health lifestyle and health status because of diagnosed conditions that impact health behaviors in adulthood.
Bibliography Citation
Cockerham, William C., Joseph D. Wolfe and Shawn Bauldry. "Health Lifestyles in Late Middle Age." Research on Aging 42,1 (January 2020): 34-46.
3. Wolfe, Joseph D.
Age at First Birth and Alcohol Use
Journal of Health and Social Behavior 50,4 (December 2009): 395-409.
Also: http://hsb.sagepub.com/content/50/4/395.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Age at First Birth; Alcohol Use; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Modeling, Multilevel; Parenthood; Stress; Transition, Adulthood

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Two theoretical perspectives, role incompatibility and stress proliferation, suggest that age at first birth is associated with alcohol use, but each theory offers distinct predictions about the effect of relatively early parenthood on alcohol use. This study examines the applicability of these perspectives using data spanning over twenty years (1982 to 2002) from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY). Results from fixed effects and multilevel models indicate that people decrease binge drinking surrounding the transition into parenthood regardless of age at first birth. However, relatively young parents increase binge drinking as they age from early to later adulthood, while others decrease drinking. Findings support an integration of the two theoretical perspectives. Role incompatibility best describes the initial effect of parenthood, but predictions drawn from stress proliferation more accurately describe the association between early parenthood and binge drinking into later adulthood. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Wolfe, Joseph D. "Age at First Birth and Alcohol Use." Journal of Health and Social Behavior 50,4 (December 2009): 395-409.
4. Wolfe, Joseph D.
Age, Cohort, and Changing Opportunity Structures: Educational Attainment and the Health Limitations of White Women From 1967 to 2012
Presented: Chicago IL, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2017
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97, Young Women
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Educational Attainment; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Women

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

A growing body of research shows that the association between educational attainment and health is at historic highs for white women. Rapid changes in labor force participation, access to high-paying jobs, and gender attitudes have radically altered the meaning of education for women’s lives and their dependence on the education of close kin. Drawing on three nationally representative, longitudinal surveys conducted from 1967 to 2012, this study examines how personal, parental, and spousal education levels contribute to the widening education gap in health limitations for successive cohorts of white women (N = 8,144). Overall, the proportion of women with health limitations did not change appreciably across cohorts, but the analysis uncovered cohort differences in the associations between personal and close kin education and women’s health limitations. Findings identify new sources of health inequalities and demonstrate the utility of opportunity structures in locating and explaining variation in the education-health association.
Bibliography Citation
Wolfe, Joseph D. "Age, Cohort, and Changing Opportunity Structures: Educational Attainment and the Health Limitations of White Women From 1967 to 2012." Presented: Chicago IL, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2017.
5. Wolfe, Joseph D.
Age, Cohort, and Social Change: Parental and Spousal Education and White Women's Health Limitations From 1967 to 2012
Research on Aging 41,2 (February 2019): 186-210.
Also: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0164027518800486
Cohort(s): Mature Women, NLSY79, Young Women
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Educational Attainment; Health, Chronic Conditions; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

A large body of research finds that the association between educational attainment and health is at historic highs for White women. Rapid changes in labor force participation, access to high-paying jobs, and gender attitudes have radically altered the meaning of education for women's lives and their dependence on the socioeconomic attainments of their families. Drawing on three nationally representative longitudinal surveys conducted from 1967 to 2012, this study examines how personal, parental, and spousal attainments contribute to the widening education gap in health for successive cohorts of White women (N = 8,405). Overall, the health of women did not change substantially across cohorts, but results did uncover cohort differences among low-educated women that were linked to parental and spousal educational attainments and personal earnings. These findings confirm growing educational inequalities in health and demonstrate the importance of historical context and family attainments when examining cohort variation in the education-health relationship.
Bibliography Citation
Wolfe, Joseph D. "Age, Cohort, and Social Change: Parental and Spousal Education and White Women's Health Limitations From 1967 to 2012 ." Research on Aging 41,2 (February 2019): 186-210.
6. Wolfe, Joseph D.
Maternal Alcohol Use Disorders and Depression in Emerging Adulthood: Examining the Relevance of Social Ties, Childhood Adversity, and Socioeconomic Status
Psychiatry Research 257 (November 2017): 441-445.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0165178116314226
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Childhood Adversity/Trauma; Depression (see also CESD); Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Parental Influences; Social Environment; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

A number of recent studies have found that alcohol use disorders (AUDs) among parents are associated with higher levels of depression in their adult children. However, these studies have not considered whether several important social conditions in childhood help explain this association. Using a large sample of young adults from the National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth 1979 Children and Young Adults (NLSY79-CY), this study examines changes in the relationship between maternal AUDs and depression in emerging adulthood after controlling for three clusters of variables related to childhood social ties, adversity, and socioeconomic status. After models adjust for these factors, the association is reduced but maternal AUDs remain a robust predictor of depression in emerging adulthood. These findings highlight the intergenerational consequences of AUDs and the need to develop interventions that supplement children's social support and economic circumstances.
Bibliography Citation
Wolfe, Joseph D. "Maternal Alcohol Use Disorders and Depression in Emerging Adulthood: Examining the Relevance of Social Ties, Childhood Adversity, and Socioeconomic Status." Psychiatry Research 257 (November 2017): 441-445.
7. Wolfe, Joseph D.
The Effects of Maternal Alcohol Use Disorders on Childhood Relationships and Mental Health
Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology 51,10 (October 2016): 1439-1448.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00127-016-1264-x
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Childhood Adversity/Trauma; Health, Mental; Mothers, Behavior; Parental Influences; Peers/Peer influence/Peer relations; Siblings; Sociability/Socialization/Social Interaction

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Purpose: Despite millions of children living in the turmoil of their parents' active alcoholism or the aftermath of past abuse, research to date has not (1) provided a comprehensive examination of the effects of maternal alcohol use disorders (AUDs) on children's social ties outside of their relationships with parents, or (2) considered whether the number and quality of childhood social ties alter the effects of maternal AUDs on children's mental health.

Method: Using data from the National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth 1979 Children and Young Adults, analysis examined the influence of maternal AUDs on the number and quality of children's ties with siblings, extended family and family friends, peers, and neighborhood members. The analysis also considered how children's social ties influenced the association between maternal AUDs and children's internalizing and externalizing problems.

Results: Children of alcoholic mothers had similarly sized networks but more distant relationships with siblings and friends, negative interactions with classmates, and isolating neighborhoods. Controlling for these aspects of children's social ties substantially reduced mental health disparities between children of alcoholic mothers and other children.

Bibliography Citation
Wolfe, Joseph D. "The Effects of Maternal Alcohol Use Disorders on Childhood Relationships and Mental Health." Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology 51,10 (October 2016): 1439-1448.
8. Wolfe, Joseph D.
The Effects of Socioeconomic Status on Child and Adolescent Physical Health: An Organization and Systematic Comparison of Measures
Social Indicators Research 123,1 (August 2015): 39-58.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11205-014-0733-4
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Adolescent health; Child Health; Child Health, Limiting Condition(s); Children, Illness; Children, Poverty; Family Income; Family Resources; Maternal Employment; Mothers, Education; Poverty; Socioeconomic Factors; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Prior research has established a link between SES and early life health without providing clear theoretical or empirical evidence for using any particular conceptualization or operationalization of SES. Researchers refer to almost any combination of variables related to families’ economic, educational, or occupational circumstances as SES. This abundance of operationalizations makes it difficult to determine how exactly SES shapes early life health. Childhood and adolescence are unique periods of life delineated by extensive social, psychological, and physical transitions. Although these changes may make children and adolescents sensitive to different aspects of SES, research has yet to systematically compare an array of SES measures extensive enough to rigorously examine this possibility. To address this gap, I merge the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY79) and the NLSY79 Children and Young Adults datasets. In analyses, I consider multiple operationalizations of SES derived from the distinct components conceptualization of SES. I find that the best model of SES and early life health includes family income, wealth, education, and occupational prestige. Family income and wealth play especially important roles in early life health but also impact child and adolescent health differently. Children’s health is more vulnerable to their families’ wealth, while adolescents’ health is more sensitive to their families’ current income. Together, the countervailing effects of family income and wealth negate one another such that the overall effect of economic conditions on health is the same for children and adolescents. My findings provide evidence that future research should carefully consider multiple measures of SES when studying the relationship between SES and early life health.
Bibliography Citation
Wolfe, Joseph D. "The Effects of Socioeconomic Status on Child and Adolescent Physical Health: An Organization and Systematic Comparison of Measures." Social Indicators Research 123,1 (August 2015): 39-58.
9. Wolfe, Joseph D.
Who's Hurt Most by Economic Shock? Exploring Heterogeneity in the Health-Related Effects of Wealth Loss
Innovation in Aging 4, S1 (December 2020): 585.
Also: https://academic.oup.com/innovateage/article/4/Supplement_1/585/6036008
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Keyword(s): Economic Changes/Recession; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Socioeconomic Status (SES); Wealth

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Prior research finds evidence of an effect of negative economic shocks on health, but this growing area has not fully investigated variation in this effect. A large number of people from diverse backgrounds experience a substantial financial setback of some type, and differences related to one's gender, race/ethnicity, and socioeconomic status (SES) may influence the consequences of economic shocks on one's life such that the health-related effects of shocks vary systematically in the U.S. population. Thus, this study aims to identify the effects of multiple economic shocks on health in middle adulthood, and whether the effects of shocks on health vary by one's underlying propensity to experience the shock. The analysis uses newly developed statistical techniques from causal inference literature and over twenty-five years of biographical information from the NLSY-79. Results from the analysis help shed light on important variation in the association between negative economic shocks and health.
Bibliography Citation
Wolfe, Joseph D. "Who's Hurt Most by Economic Shock? Exploring Heterogeneity in the Health-Related Effects of Wealth Loss." Innovation in Aging 4, S1 (December 2020): 585.
10. Wolfe, Joseph D.
Baker, Elizabeth H.
Scarinci, Isabel C.
Wealth and Obesity Among US Adults Entering Midlife
Obesity 27,12 (December 2019): 2067-2075.
Also: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/oby.22625
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Gender Differences; Home Ownership; Net Worth; Obesity; Racial Differences; Wealth

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objective: This study examines the relationship between wealth and obesity among adults entering midlife and whether this relationship varies by sex, race, and measure of wealth.

Methods: The data were obtained from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY‐79). Population‐averaged models were used to examine the associations between multiple measures of wealth and obesity among 6,979 respondents while controlling for education, occupation, income, and relevant sociodemographic variables.

Results: The analysis found a robust association between wealth and midlife obesity as well as heterogeneity in the wealth‐obesity association across sex, race, and measure of wealth. With the exception of black men, net worth generally had a significant and inverse relationship with obesity. The net worth-obesity association was largest among women and was driven primarily by home value, in addition to savings and debt for black women. Although home value was significant for white men, the components of wealth were generally unrelated to obesity among men.

Bibliography Citation
Wolfe, Joseph D., Elizabeth H. Baker and Isabel C. Scarinci. "Wealth and Obesity Among US Adults Entering Midlife." Obesity 27,12 (December 2019): 2067-2075.
11. Wolfe, Joseph D.
Baker, Elizabeth H.
Uddin, Jalal
Kirkland, Stephanie
Varieties of Financial Stressors and Midlife Health Problems
Journals of Gerontology: Series B published online (17 June 2021): gbab108.
Also: https://doi.org/10.1093/geronb/gbab108
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Gerontological Society of America
Keyword(s): Bankruptcy; Debt/Borrowing; Health, Chronic Conditions; Health, Mental; Stress

Objective: Financial stressors such as wealth loss, indebtedness, and bankruptcy have gained the attention of public health scholars since the Great Recession. In this study, we extend this area of research by comparing the mental and physical impact of multiple financial stressors during midlife, a pivotal period in the life course for wealth accumulation and disease onset.

Methods: With data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (www.nlsinfo.org), an ongoing survey of adult men and women in the U.S., we used logistic regression to estimate the associations between financial stressors and the risk of a psychiatric disorder or high blood pressure diagnosis from ages 31-39 in 1996 to ages 50-59 in 2016 (N = 7,143). Financial stressors include multiple types of wealth loss, debt, and bankruptcy.

Results: Even after adjusting for a comprehensive set of confounders, many of the financial stressors we considered had similar associations with the risk of a psychiatric disorder, whereas only debt and bankruptcy were associated with the risk of high blood pressure. The best fitting models for both health outcomes included a simple indicator of indebtedness. Stock losses were not significantly associated with either health outcome.

Bibliography Citation
Wolfe, Joseph D., Elizabeth H. Baker, Jalal Uddin and Stephanie Kirkland. "Varieties of Financial Stressors and Midlife Health Problems." Journals of Gerontology: Series B published online (17 June 2021): gbab108.
12. Wolfe, Joseph D.
Bauldry, Shawn
Hardy, Melissa A.
Pavalko, Eliza K.
Multigenerational Attainments and Mortality Among Older Men: An Adjacent Generations Approach
Presented: Denver CO, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2018
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Educational Attainment; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Mortality; Occupational Attainment; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Recent work in stratification argues the importance of multiple generations in attainment processes. In support of this line of reasoning, studies find evidence that grandparent and parent socioeconomic attainments are associated with both children's life chances and health. This research generally assumes that the rewards of attainment are paid forward across successive generations, but an emerging literature suggests that mortality risk in old age is linked to the attainments of parents and adult children. No single study, however, considers the unique multigenerational structure of health disparities suggested by this literature. To address this gap, we use nearly complete and recently updated information on mortality from the National Longitudinal Survey of Older Men (NLS-OM), a nationally representative sample of U.S. men aged 45 to 59 beginning in 1966. Our results support a three-generation model in which men with high-attaining adult children have an especially low risk of mortality in later life.
Bibliography Citation
Wolfe, Joseph D., Shawn Bauldry, Melissa A. Hardy and Eliza K. Pavalko. "Multigenerational Attainments and Mortality Among Older Men: An Adjacent Generations Approach." Presented: Denver CO, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2018.
13. Wolfe, Joseph D.
Bauldry, Shawn
Hardy, Melissa A.
Pavalko, Eliza K.
Multigenerational Attainments, Race, and Mortality Risk among Silent Generation Women
Journal of Health and Social Behavior 59,3 (September 2018): 335-351.
Also: http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0022146518784596
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Educational Attainment; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Mortality; Occupations; Racial Differences; Socioeconomic Status (SES); Wealth

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study extends health disparities research by examining racial differences in the relationships between multigenerational attainments and mortality risk among "Silent Generation" women. An emerging literature suggests that the socioeconomic attainments of adjacent generations, one's parents and adult children, provide an array of life-extending resources in old age. Prior research, however, has demonstrated neither how multigenerational resources are implicated in women's longevity nor how racial disparities faced by Silent Generation women may differentially structure the relationships between socioeconomic attainments and mortality. With data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Mature Women, the analysis provided evidence of a three-generation model in which parent occupation, family wealth, and adult child education were independently associated with women's mortality. Although we found evidence of racial differences in the associations between parental, personal, and spousal education and mortality risk, the education of adult children was a robust predictor of survival for black and white women.
Bibliography Citation
Wolfe, Joseph D., Shawn Bauldry, Melissa A. Hardy and Eliza K. Pavalko. "Multigenerational Attainments, Race, and Mortality Risk among Silent Generation Women." Journal of Health and Social Behavior 59,3 (September 2018): 335-351.
14. Wolfe, Joseph D.
Bauldry, Shawn
Hardy, Melissa A.
Pavalko, Eliza K.
Multigenerational Socioeconomic Attainments and Mortality Among Older Men: An Adjacent Generations Approach
Demographic Research 39 (2018): 719-752.
Also: https://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol39/26/default.htm
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research
Keyword(s): Educational Attainment; Mortality; Occupations; Socioeconomic Background

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objective: We develop a new approach to understanding family attainments and mortality in later life and test the multigenerational structure of health disparities suggested by the long arm, personal attainment, and social foreground perspectives.

Methods: The analysis uses nearly complete mortality data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Older Men, a representative sample of US men aged 45 to 59 in 1966.

Results: We find that older men with parents who farmed had a median age of death that was 1.3 years higher than those who had parents with manual occupations, and men with adult children who had 16 or more years of schooling had a median age of death almost 2 years higher than those with children with 12 or fewer years of schooling.

Bibliography Citation
Wolfe, Joseph D., Shawn Bauldry, Melissa A. Hardy and Eliza K. Pavalko. "Multigenerational Socioeconomic Attainments and Mortality Among Older Men: An Adjacent Generations Approach." Demographic Research 39 (2018): 719-752.
15. Wolfe, Joseph D.
Bauldry, Shawn
Pavalko, Eliza K.
Hardy, Melissa A.
Multigenerational Educational Attainment and Women's Mortality
Presented: Seattle WA, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2016
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Educational Attainment; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Mortality

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study develops and tests a model of multigenerational educational attainment and women's mortality. While developed separately, the long arm, personal attainment, and social foreground perspectives suggest a single, overarching process in which parent, personal, and adult child educational attainment provide unique health-related resources at various points in the life course. No single study, however, tests whether the attainment of multiple generations has a cumulative effect on women's mortality. Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Mature Women (NLS-MW), a nationally representative sample with recently updated information on mortality, this paper examines the relationships between mortality and the educational attainment of three generations whose lives, when taken together, span the entirety of the twentieth century. Results indicate that adult child educational attainment is an important predictor of older women's mortality risk, whereas parent, personal, and husband attainment appear to have no association with mortality after adjusting for adult child attainment and sociodemographic controls. An integration of these findings with prior research on mortality suggests a model of multigenerational attainment and mortality in which, as women grow older, the relative importance of each generation's attainment for one's survival shifts from past to future generations.
Bibliography Citation
Wolfe, Joseph D., Shawn Bauldry, Eliza K. Pavalko and Melissa A. Hardy. "Multigenerational Educational Attainment and Women's Mortality." Presented: Seattle WA, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2016.
16. Wolfe, Joseph D.
Bauldry, Shawn
Pavalko, Eliza K.
Hardy, Melissa A.
The Multi-Generational Effects of Socioeconomic Status on Mortality
Presented: San Diego CA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April-May 2015
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Educational Attainment; Mortality; Occupational Status; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study draws on data from the National Longitudinal Survey (NLS) Older Men Cohort linked with death records to analyze multigenerational effects of SES on mortality. In particular, the study simultaneously examines (1) the long arm perspective, which emphasizes early-life socioeconomic conditions as a cause of mortality by way of biological programming and cumulative disadvantage, (2) the status attainment perspective, which emphasizes one's own attainment as a central determinant of mortality, and (3) the social foreground perspective, which emphasizes the advantages in later life of those who have higher SES adult children. Preliminary results indicate that each generation's attainment is to varying degrees associated with one's mortality. We find that adult children's education and occupational status becomes an important resource net of one's socioeconomic resources. Parents' SES, on the other hand, had the smallest effect on mortality, which was generally reduced to non-significance after controlling for one’s attainment.
Bibliography Citation
Wolfe, Joseph D., Shawn Bauldry, Eliza K. Pavalko and Melissa A. Hardy. "The Multi-Generational Effects of Socioeconomic Status on Mortality." Presented: San Diego CA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April-May 2015.
17. Wolfe, Joseph D.
Thomeer, Mieke
Marital and Racial Disparities in Economic Resources and Survival Among Older Women
Presented: Austin TX, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2019
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Home Ownership; Marital Status; Mortality; Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Married White women generally live longer than their divorced counterparts, but studies show little to no difference in married and divorced Black women's mortality risk. Many potential explanations for these patterns are related to the distribution of economic resources related to marital status and race. Nevertheless, research in this area has yet to consider the components of income and wealth. This study examines recently updated mortality information and economic records for women from the NLS-MW (N=4,687), a cohort that came into adulthood during a period of low divorce rates but profound gender- and race-based stratification. Results provide evidence that the low mortality risk of married White women is linked to their ownership of more valuable homes than Black women and divorced and never-married White women. Our findings suggest that interventions aimed at reducing health disparities must first address the social causes of housing and other wealth-based inequali
Bibliography Citation
Wolfe, Joseph D. and Mieke Thomeer. "Marital and Racial Disparities in Economic Resources and Survival Among Older Women." Presented: Austin TX, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2019.
18. Wolfe, Joseph D.
Thomeer, Mieke Beth
Divorce, Economic Resources, and Survival among Older Black and White Women
Journal of Marriage and Family published online (17 July 2020): DOI: 10.1111/jomf.12702.
Also: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jomf.12702
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Divorce; Economic Well-Being; Home Ownership; Mortality; Net Worth; Racial Differences

Objective: This study identifies which midlife economic resources reduce the association between divorce and mortality risk among older Black and White women. Method: Fractional logistic regression and Gompertz proportional hazards models were estimated with data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Mature Women (N = 4,668; nlsinfo.org) to examine the associations between divorce, economic resources, and mortality among older Black and White women (born 1923-1937). Results: Divorced White women had significantly less housing and financial wealth than their continuously married counterparts, and both Black and White divorcees had less vehicle wealth and higher probabilities of indebtedness. With respect to survival, net worth and housing wealth accounted for the largest reductions in marital and racial differences in survival.
Bibliography Citation
Wolfe, Joseph D. and Mieke Beth Thomeer. "Divorce, Economic Resources, and Survival among Older Black and White Women." Journal of Marriage and Family published online (17 July 2020): DOI: 10.1111/jomf.12702.