Search Results

Author: Bauldry, Shawn
Resulting in 6 citations.
1. Bauldry, Shawn
Wolfe, Joseph D.
Adult Children's Education and Parent Mortality: Exploring Mechanisms
Presented: Austin TX, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2019
Cohort(s): Mature Women, Older Men
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Educational Attainment; Mortality; Parental Influences; Smoking (see Cigarette Use); Transfers, Financial

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

A series of recent studies find a robust association between adult children's education and parent health. Three mechanisms are thought to underlie the observed associations: the provision of direct care, the transfer of financial resources, and the influence on health behaviors, in particular smoking, of parents. This research draws on data from the National Longitudinal Surveys of Older Men and Mature Women and causal mediation models to test the three mechanisms.
Bibliography Citation
Bauldry, Shawn and Joseph D. Wolfe. "Adult Children's Education and Parent Mortality: Exploring Mechanisms." Presented: Austin TX, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2019.
2. Wolfe, Joseph D.
Bauldry, Shawn
Hardy, Melissa A.
Pavalko, Eliza K.
Multigenerational Attainments and Mortality Among Older Men: An Adjacent Generations Approach
Presented: Denver CO, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2018
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Educational Attainment; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Mortality; Occupational Attainment; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Recent work in stratification argues the importance of multiple generations in attainment processes. In support of this line of reasoning, studies find evidence that grandparent and parent socioeconomic attainments are associated with both children's life chances and health. This research generally assumes that the rewards of attainment are paid forward across successive generations, but an emerging literature suggests that mortality risk in old age is linked to the attainments of parents and adult children. No single study, however, considers the unique multigenerational structure of health disparities suggested by this literature. To address this gap, we use nearly complete and recently updated information on mortality from the National Longitudinal Survey of Older Men (NLS-OM), a nationally representative sample of U.S. men aged 45 to 59 beginning in 1966. Our results support a three-generation model in which men with high-attaining adult children have an especially low risk of mortality in later life.
Bibliography Citation
Wolfe, Joseph D., Shawn Bauldry, Melissa A. Hardy and Eliza K. Pavalko. "Multigenerational Attainments and Mortality Among Older Men: An Adjacent Generations Approach." Presented: Denver CO, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2018.
3. Wolfe, Joseph D.
Bauldry, Shawn
Hardy, Melissa A.
Pavalko, Eliza K.
Multigenerational Attainments, Race, and Mortality Risk among Silent Generation Women
Journal of Health and Social Behavior 59,3 (September 2018): 335-351.
Also: http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0022146518784596
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Educational Attainment; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Mortality; Occupations; Racial Differences; Socioeconomic Status (SES); Wealth

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study extends health disparities research by examining racial differences in the relationships between multigenerational attainments and mortality risk among "Silent Generation" women. An emerging literature suggests that the socioeconomic attainments of adjacent generations, one's parents and adult children, provide an array of life-extending resources in old age. Prior research, however, has demonstrated neither how multigenerational resources are implicated in women's longevity nor how racial disparities faced by Silent Generation women may differentially structure the relationships between socioeconomic attainments and mortality. With data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Mature Women, the analysis provided evidence of a three-generation model in which parent occupation, family wealth, and adult child education were independently associated with women's mortality. Although we found evidence of racial differences in the associations between parental, personal, and spousal education and mortality risk, the education of adult children was a robust predictor of survival for black and white women.
Bibliography Citation
Wolfe, Joseph D., Shawn Bauldry, Melissa A. Hardy and Eliza K. Pavalko. "Multigenerational Attainments, Race, and Mortality Risk among Silent Generation Women." Journal of Health and Social Behavior 59,3 (September 2018): 335-351.
4. Wolfe, Joseph D.
Bauldry, Shawn
Hardy, Melissa A.
Pavalko, Eliza K.
Multigenerational Socioeconomic Attainments and Mortality Among Older Men: An Adjacent Generations Approach
Demographic Research 39 (2018): 719-752.
Also: https://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol39/26/default.htm
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research
Keyword(s): Educational Attainment; Mortality; Occupations; Socioeconomic Background

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objective: We develop a new approach to understanding family attainments and mortality in later life and test the multigenerational structure of health disparities suggested by the long arm, personal attainment, and social foreground perspectives.

Methods: The analysis uses nearly complete mortality data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Older Men, a representative sample of US men aged 45 to 59 in 1966.

Results: We find that older men with parents who farmed had a median age of death that was 1.3 years higher than those who had parents with manual occupations, and men with adult children who had 16 or more years of schooling had a median age of death almost 2 years higher than those with children with 12 or fewer years of schooling.

Bibliography Citation
Wolfe, Joseph D., Shawn Bauldry, Melissa A. Hardy and Eliza K. Pavalko. "Multigenerational Socioeconomic Attainments and Mortality Among Older Men: An Adjacent Generations Approach." Demographic Research 39 (2018): 719-752.
5. Wolfe, Joseph D.
Bauldry, Shawn
Pavalko, Eliza K.
Hardy, Melissa A.
Multigenerational Educational Attainment and Women's Mortality
Presented: Seattle WA, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2016
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Educational Attainment; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Mortality

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study develops and tests a model of multigenerational educational attainment and women's mortality. While developed separately, the long arm, personal attainment, and social foreground perspectives suggest a single, overarching process in which parent, personal, and adult child educational attainment provide unique health-related resources at various points in the life course. No single study, however, tests whether the attainment of multiple generations has a cumulative effect on women's mortality. Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Mature Women (NLS-MW), a nationally representative sample with recently updated information on mortality, this paper examines the relationships between mortality and the educational attainment of three generations whose lives, when taken together, span the entirety of the twentieth century. Results indicate that adult child educational attainment is an important predictor of older women's mortality risk, whereas parent, personal, and husband attainment appear to have no association with mortality after adjusting for adult child attainment and sociodemographic controls. An integration of these findings with prior research on mortality suggests a model of multigenerational attainment and mortality in which, as women grow older, the relative importance of each generation's attainment for one's survival shifts from past to future generations.
Bibliography Citation
Wolfe, Joseph D., Shawn Bauldry, Eliza K. Pavalko and Melissa A. Hardy. "Multigenerational Educational Attainment and Women's Mortality." Presented: Seattle WA, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2016.
6. Wolfe, Joseph D.
Bauldry, Shawn
Pavalko, Eliza K.
Hardy, Melissa A.
The Multi-Generational Effects of Socioeconomic Status on Mortality
Presented: San Diego CA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April-May 2015
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Educational Attainment; Mortality; Occupational Status; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study draws on data from the National Longitudinal Survey (NLS) Older Men Cohort linked with death records to analyze multigenerational effects of SES on mortality. In particular, the study simultaneously examines (1) the long arm perspective, which emphasizes early-life socioeconomic conditions as a cause of mortality by way of biological programming and cumulative disadvantage, (2) the status attainment perspective, which emphasizes one's own attainment as a central determinant of mortality, and (3) the social foreground perspective, which emphasizes the advantages in later life of those who have higher SES adult children. Preliminary results indicate that each generation's attainment is to varying degrees associated with one's mortality. We find that adult children's education and occupational status becomes an important resource net of one's socioeconomic resources. Parents' SES, on the other hand, had the smallest effect on mortality, which was generally reduced to non-significance after controlling for one’s attainment.
Bibliography Citation
Wolfe, Joseph D., Shawn Bauldry, Eliza K. Pavalko and Melissa A. Hardy. "The Multi-Generational Effects of Socioeconomic Status on Mortality." Presented: San Diego CA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April-May 2015.