Search Results

Author: Zagorsky, Jay L.
Resulting in 27 citations.
1. Galizzi, Monica
Zagorsky, Jay L.
How Do On-the-Job Injuries and Illnesses Impact Wealth?
Labour Economics 16,1 (January 2009): 26-36.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0927537108000171
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Benefits; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Heterogeneity; Illnesses; Income; Income Distribution; Injuries, Workplace; Unemployment Compensation; Wage Differentials; Wealth; Well-Being

This research focuses on one neglected area of workers' compensation research, the effect of injury and illness on net worth. We track participants in the NLSY79: one-third of these baby boomers were hurt at work, but 38% of them did not file for workers' compensation. We find that the typical young baby boomer who is never injured has both much higher absolute wealth and wealth growth rates than boomers who are ever injured. Regression results that control for unobserved heterogeneity suggest, however, that the injury does not predict lower wealth unless workers have reported wage losses or spells off work because of their accidents. For these employees wealth is dramatically reduced, regardless of their participation in the workers' compensation system. We also find that injured workers significantly reduce their consumption over time. These results raise new questions about the adequacy of workers' compensation benefits and the quality of jobs injured workers are able to return to. They suggest that sudden health problems caused by occupational injuries may affect more than employers' costs and individuals' incomes; they may have also wider and longer lasting consequences in term of families' wealth and well-being.
Bibliography Citation
Galizzi, Monica and Jay L. Zagorsky. "How Do On-the-Job Injuries and Illnesses Impact Wealth?" Labour Economics 16,1 (January 2009): 26-36.
2. Lang, Kevin
Zagorsky, Jay L.
Does Growing Up with a Parent Absent Really Hurt?
Working Paper, Center for Human Resource Research,The Ohio State University, Columbus OH, October 1997
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Children; Cognitive Ability; Education; Fathers, Absence; Fathers, Presence; Gender Differences; Household Composition; Wealth

It is widely recognized that children who grow up without one of their biological parents in the home do worse, on average, than other children. However, having a single parent is highly correlated with lots of other socioeconomic disadvantages. Therefore, we must be cautious about ascribing the negative outcome to the parent's absence. Using a variety of controls and instruments, we find little evidence that absence of a parent affects income or wealth. Father's presence has a notable impact on cognitive ability, education and marital status for men. For women. mother's presence is important for cognitive ability and education.
Bibliography Citation
Lang, Kevin and Jay L. Zagorsky. "Does Growing Up with a Parent Absent Really Hurt?" Working Paper, Center for Human Resource Research,The Ohio State University, Columbus OH, October 1997.
3. Lang, Kevin
Zagorsky, Jay L.
Does Growing Up with a Parent Absent Really Hurt?
Journal of Human Resources 36,2 (Spring 2001): 253-273.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3069659
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: University of Wisconsin Press
Keyword(s): Children; Cognitive Ability; Economic Well-Being; Fathers, Absence; Parental Influences; Parents, Single

It is widely recognized that children who grow up without a biological parent do worse, on average, than other children. However, because having a single parent is highly correlated with many other socioeconomic disadvantages, the negative outcomes might be caused by something beyond the parent's absence. Econometric tests using a variety of background controls and parental death as an exogenous cause of absence, show little evidence that a parent's presence during childhood affects economic well being in adulthood. The two exceptions are that living without a mother impacts girls' cognitive performance while having a father die lowers sons' chances of marriage.
Bibliography Citation
Lang, Kevin and Jay L. Zagorsky. "Does Growing Up with a Parent Absent Really Hurt?" Journal of Human Resources 36,2 (Spring 2001): 253-273.
4. Smith, Patricia K.
Zagorsky, Jay L.
"Do I Look Fat?" Self-Perceived Body Weight and Labor Market Outcomes
Economics and Human Biology 30 (September 2018): 48-58.
Also: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1570677X17302617
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Body Mass Index (BMI); Employment; Labor Market Outcomes; Self-Perception; Wages; Weight

Research reporting that greater body weight is associated with lower wages and employment, particularly among women, focuses on how employers perceive workers. In contrast, we examine whether workers' own perceptions of body weight influence labor market outcomes. Numerous studies find that misperception of body weight influences health behaviors and health, both mental and physical. For example, anorexia nervosa involves the over-perception of weight and raises the risk of cardiovascular disease. Do the health consequences of inaccurate self-perceived weight carry through to the labor market? We use the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 (NLSY97) to investigate patterns in weight misperception and three labor market outcomes. We find little evidence that either over-perception or under-perception of weight is associated with wages, weeks worked, or the number of jobs held for women and men.
Bibliography Citation
Smith, Patricia K. and Jay L. Zagorsky. ""Do I Look Fat?" Self-Perceived Body Weight and Labor Market Outcomes." Economics and Human Biology 30 (September 2018): 48-58.
5. Zagorsky, Jay L.
Are Blondes Really Dumb?
Economics Bulletin 36,1 (2016): 401-410.
Also: http://econpapers.repec.org/scripts/search.pl?ft=blondes
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Economics Bulletin
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); I.Q.; Physical Characteristics

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Discrimination based on appearance has serious economic consequences. Women with blonde hair are often considered beautiful, but dumb, which is a potentially harmful stereotype since many employers seek intelligent workers. Using the NLSY79, a large nationally representative survey tracking young baby boomers, this research analyzes the IQ of white women and men according to hair color. Blonde women have a higher mean IQ than women with brown, red and black hair. Blondes are more likely classified as geniuses and less likely to have extremely low IQ than women with other hair colors, suggesting the dumb blonde stereotype is a myth.
Bibliography Citation
Zagorsky, Jay L. "Are Blondes Really Dumb?" Economics Bulletin 36,1 (2016): 401-410.
6. Zagorsky, Jay L.
Do People Save or Spend Their Inheritances? Understanding What Happens to Inherited Wealth
Journal of Family and Economic Issues 34,1 (March 2013): 64-76.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10834-012-9299-y
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Inheritance; Savings; Transfers, Family; Transfers, Financial; Wealth

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Almost $4 trillion dollars of wealth is currently held by families with a life expectancy of less than 10 years. When that wealth is inherited, will it be retained or spent quickly? Results from the NLSY79, a longitudinal survey covering people in their 20s, 30s, and 40s suggest roughly half of all money inherited is saved and the other half spent or lost investing. These spending and saving decisions are made by a concentrated group with about one-fifth of all families getting an inheritance and about one-seventh expecting to receive an inheritance. Suggestions to increase savings from inheritances are discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Zagorsky, Jay L. "Do People Save or Spend Their Inheritances? Understanding What Happens to Inherited Wealth." Journal of Family and Economic Issues 34,1 (March 2013): 64-76.
7. Zagorsky, Jay L.
Do You Have to be Smart to be Rich? The Impact of IQ on Wealth, Income and Financial Distress
Intelligence 35,5 (September-October 2007): 489-501.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0160289607000219
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Bankruptcy; I.Q.; Income; Intelligence; Test Scores/Test theory/IRT; Wealth

How important is intelligence to financial success? Using the NLSY79, which tracks a large group of young U.S. baby boomers, this research shows that each point increase in IQ test scores raises income by between $234 and $616 per year after holding a variety of factors constant. Regression results suggest no statistically distinguishable relationship between IQ scores and wealth. Financial distress, such as problems paying bills, going bankrupt or reaching credit card limits, is related to IQ scores not linearly but instead in a quadratic relationship. This means higher IQ scores sometimes increase the probability of being in financial difficulty.
Bibliography Citation
Zagorsky, Jay L. "Do You Have to be Smart to be Rich? The Impact of IQ on Wealth, Income and Financial Distress." Intelligence 35,5 (September-October 2007): 489-501.
8. Zagorsky, Jay L.
Does Smoking Harm Wealth as Much as Health?
Consumer Interests Annual 50 (2004): 108-116.
Also: http://www.consumerinterests.org/files/public/Zagorsky_Does_Smoking_Harm_Wealth.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Council on Consumer Interests (ACCI)
Keyword(s): Cigarette Use (see Smoking); Smoking (see Cigarette Use); Wealth

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This research investigates the effect of smoking on an individual/s financial situation. Theoretically there are only three possible effects; smoking reduces wealth, smoking increases wealth and smoking has no effect. Using wealth and smoking data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 cohort, this research shows that the typical nonsmokers' net worth is roughly 50% higher than light smokers and roughly twice the level of heavy smokers. Regression results which account for demographic differences between smokers and non-smokers also find a statistically significant negative relationship between net worth and smoking.
Bibliography Citation
Zagorsky, Jay L. "Does Smoking Harm Wealth as Much as Health?" Consumer Interests Annual 50 (2004): 108-116.
9. Zagorsky, Jay L.
Ethical Behaviors and Wealth: Generation Y's Experience
Journal Of Financial Counseling And Planning 28, 2 (2017): 181-195.
Also: https://www.afcpe.org/news-and-publications/journal-of-financial-counseling-and-planning
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Association for Financial Counseling and Planning Education (U.S.) (AFCPE)
Keyword(s): Arrests; Behavior, Antisocial; Behavior, Prosocial; Financial Behaviors/Decisions; Net Worth; Wealth

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This research investigates if ethical behaviors and personal finances are related using a large scale U.S. random survey called the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 (NLSY97). Fifteen indicators covering both ethical and unethical behaviors are compared to net worth for people in their 20s and 30s, who are called Generation Y. Breaking rules, stealing, and being arrested are associated with less wealth in this generation. Results suggest that among people in their early 20s, there is little or no relationship between ethical behaviors and wealth. However, as this cohort ages, a positive relationship between acting more ethically and wealth emerges.
Bibliography Citation
Zagorsky, Jay L. "Ethical Behaviors and Wealth: Generation Y's Experience." Journal Of Financial Counseling And Planning 28, 2 (2017): 181-195.
10. Zagorsky, Jay L.
Health and the Working Poor
Eastern Economic Journal 25,2 (Spring 1999): 169-189.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/pss/40325919
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan Journals
Keyword(s): Addiction; Disability; Disabled Workers; Employment; Health Factors; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Poverty; Welfare

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Recent welfare reforms that emphasize shifting people on public assistance into employment, no matter what they earn, has given new public policy importance to understanding the working poor. Central to these reforms are time limits that cap the number of years individuals can recieve benefits. Time limits implicitly assume that working provides enough income to lift one out of poverty and that the poor have no long-term health problems and other personal disabilities that can prevent them from escaping poverty and that working does not always boost individuals out of poverty. This research examines the working poor who are limited by health, drug and alcohol addiction or serious personal disabilities such as blindness. Approximately one-third of working-poor baby boomers suffers from at least one of these problems. This includes over half a million young baby boomers and approximately one percent of the U.S. population. Besides comprising a large proportion of the working poor, those with health and other limitations are important to examine because they have twice the chance of becoming working poor, spend more years in poverty, and have lower incomes after leaving poverty. In addition, almost half of the working poor who suffer from health or other serious limitations remain in poverty for five or more years. Thus, in order to reduce working poverty, policymakers must consider the needs and limitations of those who have significant health problems and other personal disabilities.
Bibliography Citation
Zagorsky, Jay L. "Health and the Working Poor." Eastern Economic Journal 25,2 (Spring 1999): 169-189.
11. Zagorsky, Jay L.
Health and Wealth: The Late-20th Century Obesity Epidemic in the U.S.
Economics and Human Biology 3,2 (July 2005): 296-313.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1570677X05000304
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Body Mass Index (BMI); Health Factors; Inheritance; Obesity; Racial Differences; Wealth; Weight

Obesity is a rapidly growing public health issue. This paper investigates obesity's relationship to individuals' wealth by analyzing data from a large U.S. longitudinal socio-economic survey. The results show a large negative association between BMI and White female's net worth, a smaller negative association for Black women and White males and no relationship for Black males. Weight changes and dieting also appear associated with wealth changes. Individuals who lose small amounts of weight experience little change in net worth, but those who lose large amounts of weight have a dramatically improved financial position, with Whites showing larger changes than Blacks.
Bibliography Citation
Zagorsky, Jay L. "Health and Wealth: The Late-20th Century Obesity Epidemic in the U.S. ." Economics and Human Biology 3,2 (July 2005): 296-313.
12. Zagorsky, Jay L.
Husbands' and Wives' View of the Family Finances
The Journal of Socio-Economics 32,2 (May 2003): 127-146.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S105353570300012X
Cohort(s): Mature Women, NLSY79, Older Men, Young Men, Young Women
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Earnings, Husbands; Earnings, Wives; Economic Well-Being; Family Income; Husbands, Income; Income; Wives, Income

Do husbands and wives have the same view of the family's financial situation? This research shows that when couples are asked separately about finances, very different views emerge of income and wealth. Quantifying the gap between husbands' and wives' financial statements shows half of all couples provide family income values that differ by more than 10% and net worth values that differ by more than 30%. The typical husband states the family receives more income each year and holds more gross assets than his wife states. The typical wife reports the family owes more debts than her husband.
Bibliography Citation
Zagorsky, Jay L. "Husbands' and Wives' View of the Family Finances." The Journal of Socio-Economics 32,2 (May 2003): 127-146.
13. Zagorsky, Jay L.
Is Obesity as Dangerous to Your Wealth as to Your Health?
Research on Aging 26,1 (January 2004): 130-152.
Also: http://roa.sagepub.com/content/26/1/130.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Body Mass Index (BMI); Health Factors; Inheritance; Obesity; Wealth

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Examined the effects of obesity on the wealth of middle-aged baby boomers. Data were obtained from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, which began in 1979; analysis focuses on data from 1985 through 2000, when 7,699 participants (mean age 38.7) remained in the study. It was found that the net worth of the obese was roughly half that of those with normal body mass. As young baby boomers aged, peak net worth slowly shifted toward those with lower body mass. Boomers with a body mass index (BMI) of 22 in 1985 held the most net worth, but by 2000 the peak had shifted to those with a BMI of 17. From 1985 to 2000, for every one-point BMI increase, net worth fell an average of $1,000, holding other factors like income constant. Surprisingly, part of the reason BMI is inversely related to net worth is because lighter people receive more inheritance than heavier individuals. (MM) (AgeLine Database, copyright 2004 AARP, all rights reserved)
Bibliography Citation
Zagorsky, Jay L. "Is Obesity as Dangerous to Your Wealth as to Your Health?" Research on Aging 26,1 (January 2004): 130-152.
14. Zagorsky, Jay L.
Marriage and Divorce's Impact on Wealth
Journal of Sociology 41,4 (December 2005): 406-424
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Divorce; Longitudinal Surveys; Marriage; Wealth

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

What impact do marriage and divorce have on wealth? US data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79), which tracks individuals in their 20s, 30s and early 40s, show that over time single respondents slowly increase their net worth. Married respondents experience per person net worth increases of 77 percent over single respondents. Additionally, their wealth increases on average 16 percent for each year of marriage. Divorced respondents' wealth starts falling four years before divorce and they experience an average wealth drop of 77 percent. While in percentage terms divorce hurts women more than men, the absolute difference is relatively small in the US. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Zagorsky, Jay L. "Marriage and Divorce's Impact on Wealth." Journal of Sociology 41,4 (December 2005): 406-424.
15. Zagorsky, Jay L.
NLSY79 Wealth Data Evaluation
Working Paper, Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, July 1997
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): Data Quality/Consistency; Nonresponse; Wealth

Researchers know relatively little about the way people gather wealth. This paper provides a foundation for understanding wealth trends by investigating the data quality of a little used portion of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 cohort or NLSY79. To date, no data quality investigation has been performed on the NLSY79's wealth information. To remedy this defect, the paper first overviews the wealth data collection and analyzes its strengths and weaknesses. Then the data's quality is investigated by checking the importance of common problems, such as nonresponse, and how NLSY79 results compare with other data sets. Lastly, the creation of a longitudinal net asset series is described and basic wealth results are presented.
Bibliography Citation
Zagorsky, Jay L. "NLSY79 Wealth Data Evaluation." Working Paper, Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, July 1997.
16. Zagorsky, Jay L.
People Details
In: Business Information: Finding and Using Data In the Digital Age. J. Zagorsky, ed. Boston, MA: McGraw-Hill/Irwin, 2002
Cohort(s): NLS General
Publisher: McGraw-Hill Companies
Keyword(s): Data Analysis; NLS Description; Research Methodology

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Business Information: Finding and Using Data in the Digital Age is an excellent Internet resource tool for business information processing. More than a resource tool or handbook, Business Information provides helpful direction and support to students required to utilize the Internet in any quantitative course where data analysis is emphasized. Zagorsky's Business Information can be easily packaged with any business research, business statistics or other quantitative textbook to provide thorough coverage and instruction on how to research and utilize Internet data. This is one of the very few books currently available that focuses on doing internet-based, quantitative research. (McGraw-Hill (c) 2003, all rights reserved)
Bibliography Citation
Zagorsky, Jay L. "People Details" In: Business Information: Finding and Using Data In the Digital Age. J. Zagorsky, ed. Boston, MA: McGraw-Hill/Irwin, 2002
17. Zagorsky, Jay L.
The Wealth Effects of Smoking
Tobacco Control 13,4 (December 2004): 370-374.
Also: http://tc.bmjjournals.com/cgi/content/full/13/4/370
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: BMJ Publishing Group, Ltd. - British Medical Journal Publishing Group
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Cigarette Use (see Smoking); Economic Well-Being; Ethnic Differences; I.Q.; Modeling, Multilevel; Racial Differences; Wealth

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objective: To investigate the impact of smoking on the wealth of US young baby boomers. Methodology: The research analyses self reported responses of both smoking habits and wealth holdings from a nationally representative sample of US individuals born between 1957 to 1964 (n = 8908). Data are from four waves (1984, 1992, 1994, 1998) of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 cohort, a random survey of individuals conducted by the US Department of Labor using a stratified multistage area sample design. Results: Regression results show lower net worth is associated with smoking, after holding constant a variety of demographic factors. Respondents who were ever heavy smokers are associated with a reduction in net worth of over $8300 while light smokers are $2000 poorer compared to non-smokers. Beyond this reduction, each adult year of smoking is associated with a decrease in net worth of $410 or almost 4%. Conclusions: While a causal relation cannot be proven, smokers appear to pay for tobacco expenditures out of income that is saved by non-smokers. Hence, reductions in smoking will boost wealth, especially among the poor.
Bibliography Citation
Zagorsky, Jay L. "The Wealth Effects of Smoking." Tobacco Control 13,4 (December 2004): 370-374.
18. Zagorsky, Jay L.
Wealth, Mobility and Race: A Longitudinal Study of U.S. Young Baby Boomers
Blithewood Annandale-on-the-Hudson, NY, "Economic Mobility in America and Other Advanced Countries", Levy Economics Institute Conference, October 2002.
Also: http://www.levy.org/mobility/papers/ses5_10.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Levy Economics Institute
Keyword(s): Ethnic Differences; Hispanics; Mobility; Mobility, Economic; Racial Differences; Wealth

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Wealth in the U.S. is highly correlated with status, power, health and many other socio-economic outcomes. Wealth and its associated benefits, however, are distributed quite unevenly throughout society, with U.S. wealth data exhibiting sharp racial and ethnic differences. In national data black families hold the least wealth, Hispanic families rank in the middle, while whites and Asians hold the most...

Overall, most young baby boomers have experienced tremendous wealth mobility during the early part of their working lives. Compared to whites, blacks and Hispanics accumulate lower net worth because they start at lower wealth levels and experience less upward and more downward mobility over time.

Bibliography Citation
Zagorsky, Jay L. "Wealth, Mobility and Race: A Longitudinal Study of U.S. Young Baby Boomers." Blithewood Annandale-on-the-Hudson, NY, "Economic Mobility in America and Other Advanced Countries", Levy Economics Institute Conference, October 2002.
19. Zagorsky, Jay L.
Young Baby Boomers' Wealth
Review of Income and Wealth 45,2 (June 1999): 135-156.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1475-4991.1999.tb00325.x/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: International Association for Research in Income and Wealth (I.A.R.I.W.)
Keyword(s): Assets; Data Quality/Consistency; Gender; Home Ownership; Marriage; Wealth

Researchers know relatively little about the beginnings of wealth accumulation. This paper analyzes the wealth of young baby boomers, individuals born from 1957 to 1964, using a previously ignored wealth data set, the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY79). First, a detailed data quality evaluation is performed. Findings suggest that not cleaning NLSY79 wealth data causes nonsensical results, but there are no other serious problems. Analyzing the cleaned wealth data quantifies many stylized facts. For example, the typical baby boomer's wealth holdings increase by more than $2,000 a year. Married females hold more wealth than either married or unmarried males. Finally, while young boomers start with a majority of their wealth in illiquid holdings such as automobiles and possessions, they rapidly shift their wealth holdings into homes as they grow older.
Bibliography Citation
Zagorsky, Jay L. "Young Baby Boomers' Wealth." Review of Income and Wealth 45,2 (June 1999): 135-156.
20. Zagorsky, Jay L.
Gardecki, Rosella M.
What Have Researchers Learned from the National Longitudinal Surveys?
Journal of Economic and Social Measurement 25 (1998): 35-57.
Also: http://iospress.metapress.com/content/5et2x255j415ql9y/?p=a98cfad3710a428fa79ea6103004f3df&pi=2
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, Mature Women, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult, NLSY97, Older Men, Young Men, Young Women
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Attrition; Computer Assisted Personal Interviewing (CAPI); Crime; Data Quality/Consistency; Educational Attainment; Intelligence; Job Search; Methods/Methodology; Migration; Overview, Child Assessment Data; Parents, Single; Retirement/Retirement Planning; Schooling; Wages; Work Experience

This article examines the National Longitudinal Surveys of Labor Market Experience, commonly called the NLS. The article first provides a brief overview of the information available in these long-running surveys. Second, it discusses the contributions of NLS-based research to various topics within the field of economics. Finally, it summarizes topics within the NLS questionnaires that have expanded recently to accommodate the changing circumstances of the cohorts.
Bibliography Citation
Zagorsky, Jay L. and Rosella M. Gardecki. "What Have Researchers Learned from the National Longitudinal Surveys?" Journal of Economic and Social Measurement 25 (1998): 35-57.
21. Zagorsky, Jay L.
Rhoton, Patricia
Attrition and the National Longitudinal Surveys' Mature Women Cohort
Columbus, OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1998.
Also: http://www.nlsinfo.org/usersvc/NLS_Women/MatureWomen-AttritonRepor-July1998.pdf
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): Attrition; Data Analysis; Data Quality/Consistency; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

This article examines attrition in the National Longitudinal Survey of Mature Women. The focus of the article is threefold: it documents how much attrition has occurred, examines who has exited the survey and compares the NLS data to other national data for the same age group.
Bibliography Citation
Zagorsky, Jay L. and Patricia Rhoton. "Attrition and the National Longitudinal Surveys' Mature Women Cohort." Columbus, OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1998.
22. Zagorsky, Jay L.
Rhoton, Patricia
Attrition and the National Longitudinal Surveys' Young Women Cohort
Columbus, OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1998.
Also: http://www.nlsinfo.org/usersvc/NLS_Women/YoungWomen-AttritionReport-July1998.pdf
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): Attrition; Data Analysis; Data Quality/Consistency

This article examines attrition in the National Longitudinal Survey of Young Women. The focus of the article is threefold: it documents how much attrition has occurred, examines who has exited the survey and compares the NLS data to other national data for the same age group.
Bibliography Citation
Zagorsky, Jay L. and Patricia Rhoton. "Attrition and the National Longitudinal Surveys' Young Women Cohort." Columbus, OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1998.
23. Zagorsky, Jay L.
Rhoton, Patricia
Effects of Promised Monetary Incentives on Attrition in a Long-Term Panel Survey
Public Opinion Quarterly 72,3 (Fall 2008): 502–513.
Also: http://poq.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/reprint/nfn025?ijkey=bdDZnpycIE1jhHK&keytype=ref
Cohort(s): Mature Women, Young Women
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
Keyword(s): Attrition; Interviewing Method; Research Methodology; Women's Studies

For over 35 years, a random sample of U.S. women has responded for free to a government survey that tracks their socioeconomic development. In 2003 an experiment was run to understand if providing monetary incentives of up to $40 would impact participation rates. Providing incentives to respondents, who previously refused to participate in the last survey round, significantly boosted response rates, and resulted in longer interviews and more items answered. However, providing monetary incentives to previously willing respondents showed a mixed impact on response rates, interview times, and items answered.
Bibliography Citation
Zagorsky, Jay L. and Patricia Rhoton. "Effects of Promised Monetary Incentives on Attrition in a Long-Term Panel Survey." Public Opinion Quarterly 72,3 (Fall 2008): 502–513. A.
24. Zagorsky, Jay L.
Smith, Patricia K.
Does Asthma Impair Wealth Accumulation or Does Wealth Protect Against Asthma?
Social Science Quarterly 97,5 (November 2016): 1070-1081.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/ssqu.12293/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Asthma; Inheritance; Wealth

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objective: We investigate the association between adult asthma and wealth, testing whether the disease impairs wealth accumulation (social selection model) or if wealth protects against asthma (social causation model).

Methods: We use the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (n = 7,644) and linear and logistic regressions to estimate the association between wealth and asthma. Changes in relative wealth following an asthma diagnosis and asthma status by increases in wealth through inheritance provide evidence on the causal direction.

Results: Asthma, particularly severe asthma, is associated with lower wealth. Wealth ranking does not change after a diagnosis of asthma, but inheriting a substantial sum is associated with a lower risk of severe asthma.

Conclusion: Wealth appears to protect against severe asthma, supporting the social causation model of disease.

Bibliography Citation
Zagorsky, Jay L. and Patricia K. Smith. "Does Asthma Impair Wealth Accumulation or Does Wealth Protect Against Asthma?" Social Science Quarterly 97,5 (November 2016): 1070-1081.
25. Zagorsky, Jay L.
Smith, Patricia K.
The Association between Socioeconomic Status and Adult Fast-Food Consumption in the U.S.
Economics and Human Biology 27,A (November 2017): 12-25.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1570677X16300363
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Nutritional Status/Nutrition/Consumption Behaviors; Socioeconomic Status (SES); Wealth

Health follows a socioeconomic status (SES) gradient in developed countries with disease prevalence falling as SES rises. This pattern is partially attributed to differences in nutritional intake, with the poor eating the least healthy diets. This paper examines whether there is an SES gradient in one specific aspect of nutrition: fast-food consumption. Fast food is generally high in calories and low in nutrients. We use data from the 2008, 2010, and 2012 waves of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79) to test whether adult fast-food consumption in the United States falls as monetary resources rise (n = 8,136). This research uses more recent data than previous fast-food studies and includes a comprehensive measure of wealth in addition to income to measure SES. We find little evidence of a gradient in adult fast-food consumption with respect to wealth. While adults in the highest quintile are 54.5% less likely to report fast-food consumption than those in the lowest quintile, adults in the second and third quintiles are no less likely to report fast food-food intake than the poorest. Contrary to popular belief, fast-food consumption rises as income rises from the lowest to middle quintiles. The variation in adult fast-food consumption across income and wealth groups is, however, small. Those in the wealthiest quintile ate about one less fast-food meal on average than those in the lowest quintile. Other factors play a bigger role in explaining fast-food consumption: reading ingredient labels is negatively associated while soda consumption and hours of work are positively associated with fast-food consumption.
Bibliography Citation
Zagorsky, Jay L. and Patricia K. Smith. "The Association between Socioeconomic Status and Adult Fast-Food Consumption in the U.S." Economics and Human Biology 27,A (November 2017): 12-25.
26. Zagorsky, Jay L.
Smith, Patricia K.
The Freshman 15: A Critical Time for Obesity Intervention or Media Myth?
Social Science Quarterly 92,5 (December 2011): 1389-1407.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1540-6237.2011.00823.x/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Wiley Online
Keyword(s): College Education; College Enrollment; Health Factors; Weight

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objectives: We test whether the phrase “Freshman 15” accurately describes weight change among first-year college students. We also analyze freshmen's weight change during and after college.

Methods: This is the first investigation of the “Freshman 15” to use a nationally representative random sample, the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY97). The data are analyzed using descriptive statistics, regression analysis, simulations, and longitudinal analysis.

Results: Freshmen gain between 2.5 to 3.5 pounds, on average, over the course of their first year of college. Compared to same-age noncollege attendees, the typical freshman gains only an additional half-pound. Instead of a spike in weight during the freshman year, college-educated individuals exhibit moderate but steady weight gain during and after college.

Conclusion: Anti-obesity efforts directed specifically at college freshmen will likely have little impact on obesity prevalence among young adults.

Bibliography Citation
Zagorsky, Jay L. and Patricia K. Smith. "The Freshman 15: A Critical Time for Obesity Intervention or Media Myth?" Social Science Quarterly 92,5 (December 2011): 1389-1407.
27. Zagorsky, Jay L.
Smith, Patricia K.
Who Drinks Soda Pop? Economic Status and Adult Consumption of Sugar-Sweetened Beverages
Economics and Human Biology 38 (August 2020): 100888.
Also: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1570677X1930214X
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Income; Nutritional Status/Nutrition/Consumption Behaviors; Socioeconomic Status (SES); Wealth

We use two cohorts from the National Longitudinal Surveys (NLSY79 and NLSY97), which are large, nationally representative samples of U.S. adults, to investigate consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB) by SES, using nine surveys fielded between 2008 and 2016. Previous studies used income and education to measure SES, the NLS enables us to include wealth as well. Previous studies also used cross-sectional data, whereas the NLS allows us to examine whether changes in income and wealth correlate with changes in SSB intake.

The results indicate an inverse gradient in SSB consumption with respect to both income and wealth, controlling for education. However, we do not find evidence that changes in income and wealth correlate with changes in SSB intake. This finding suggests that SES influences the development of SSB consumption patterns, but changes in income and wealth generally do not alter them in adulthood.

Bibliography Citation
Zagorsky, Jay L. and Patricia K. Smith. "Who Drinks Soda Pop? Economic Status and Adult Consumption of Sugar-Sweetened Beverages." Economics and Human Biology 38 (August 2020): 100888.