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Author: Campbell, Richard T.
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. Campbell, Richard T.
Henretta, John C.
Status Claims and Status Attainment: The Determinants of Financial Well-Being
American Journal of Sociology 86,3 (November 1980): 618-629.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2778632
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
Keyword(s): Assets; Earnings; Educational Attainment; Family Resources; Fathers, Influence; Pensions; Socioeconomic Status (SES); Well-Being

This paper examines the dimensionality of status measures related to net worth and occupation. The measures of status considered include: home equity, savings, real estate assets, business assets, earnings, and pension coverage. The authors consider the role of each in status evaluations and examine empirically whether the process of attainment of each is the same. This hypothesis is rejected and a final model presented that allows a different process of attainment for each measure. It was found that, net of earnings, family formation measures have large effects on the different status measures consistent with different patterns of family needs. Finally, the implications of using wealth and consumption measures as measures of status are discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Campbell, Richard T. and John C. Henretta. "Status Claims and Status Attainment: The Determinants of Financial Well-Being." American Journal of Sociology 86,3 (November 1980): 618-629.
2. Campbell, Richard T.
Mutran, Elizabeth
Parker, Robert N.
Longitudinal Design and Longitudinal Analysis: A Comparison of Three Approaches
Research on Aging 8,4 (December 1986): 480-502.
Also: http://roa.sagepub.com/content/8/4/480.abstract
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Age and Ageing; Research Methodology; Retirement

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper compares three methods of analyzing data in longitudinal studies of aging: multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA), the LISREL structural equation method, and event history analysis. The basic concepts of each approach are explained, and each technique is applied to data from the National Longitudinal Surveys of Labor Market Experience to illustrate its use in analyzing factors affecting the retirement decision. The results indicate that each approach has a particular conceptualization of development and change and particular design requirements, and therefore each is appropriate under different data collection regimes. MANOVA is ideal for comparisons of groups over time because its tests are precise and unambiguous, but it does not provide information about the process by which people withdraw from the labor force. The LISREL path analytic approach deals well with the concept of an intervening variable and permits nonadditivity and nonlinearity, but it does not deal well with causal contingencies or permit tests of alternative sequences. Event history or transition models requires exact information on the timing of transitions, and it can be used to estimate a number of models under various assumptions about the form of the underlying transition rate. [AgeLine]
Bibliography Citation
Campbell, Richard T., Elizabeth Mutran and Robert N. Parker. "Longitudinal Design and Longitudinal Analysis: A Comparison of Three Approaches." Research on Aging 8,4 (December 1986): 480-502.
3. Henretta, John C.
Campbell, Richard T.
Net Worth as an Aspect of Status
American Journal of Sociology 83,5 (March 1978): 1204-1223.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2778191
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
Keyword(s): Assets; Educational Returns; Family Background and Culture; Family Resources; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

This article discusses the role of net worth as a component of status and estimates a status attainment model for net worth. The findings show that: (1) the effect of family background is transmitted via education; (2) the effect of education is asymptotic rather than linear; (3) single and divorced persons possess substantially fewer assets, net of other characteristics, than married persons; and (4) net of all other variables, earnings have a considerable effect on net worth.
Bibliography Citation
Henretta, John C. and Richard T. Campbell. "Net Worth as an Aspect of Status." American Journal of Sociology 83,5 (March 1978): 1204-1223.