Search Results

Author: Stinner, William F.
Resulting in 13 citations.
1. Cheong, Keywon
Toney, Michael B.
Stinner, William F.
Racial Differences among Young Men in the Selection of Metropolitan and Nonmetropolitan Destinations
Rural Sociology 51,2 (Summer 1986): 222-228
Cohort(s): Young Men
Publisher: Rural Sociological Society
Keyword(s): Migration; Mobility, Job; Racial Differences; Rural Sociology; Rural/Urban Migration

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study is an empirical examination of the extent to which racial differences exist in young men's selection of metropolitan and nonmetropolitan destinations, after adjusting for compositional differences. The tendency of previous studies to focus on the migration of a single racial group left a gap in systematic comparisons across race. Results here, based on the Young Men cohort of the NLS, indicate that young black males are much less likely than young white males to select nonmetropolitan destinations. Migration thus increases racial segregation. The findings are discussed in both demographic and socioeconomic contexts.
Bibliography Citation
Cheong, Keywon, Michael B. Toney and William F. Stinner. "Racial Differences among Young Men in the Selection of Metropolitan and Nonmetropolitan Destinations." Rural Sociology 51,2 (Summer 1986): 222-228.
2. Jobes, Patrick C.
Stinner, William F.
Wardwell, John M
Community, Society and Migration: Noneconomic Migration in America
Lanham, MD: University Press of America, 1992
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: University Press of America
Keyword(s): Migration Patterns; Mobility, Occupational; Socioeconomic Factors

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The authors present a selection of analytical research concerning migration decision-making in the United States. The focus is primarily on such noneconomic factors associated with migration as individual characteristics, ecological factors, and community involvement and satisfaction. "This volume documents that social foundations of migration continue to be instrumental in motivating people to move or to stay. Despite the prevalent metaphoric acceptance of an economic model as the explanation governing how people behave, the analyses of migration presented here indicate that noneconomic factors continue to help determine why, when, where and who moves." (EXCERPT)
Bibliography Citation
Jobes, Patrick C., William F. Stinner and John M Wardwell. Community, Society and Migration: Noneconomic Migration in America. Lanham, MD: University Press of America, 1992.
3. Pitcher, Brian L.
Stinner, William F.
Toney, Michael B.
Patterns of Migration Propensity for Black and White American Men: Evidence from a Cohort Analysis
Research on Aging 7,1 (March 1985): 94-120.
Also: http://roa.sagepub.com/content/7/1/94.abstract
Cohort(s): Older Men, Young Men
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Age and Ageing; Migration; Racial Differences; Simultaneity

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study investigates age, period, and cohort patterns of migration for blacks and whites by applying cohort analysis models to panel data from the Young Men and Older Men samples of the National Longitudinal Surveys. The simultaneous inclusion of these four variables represents an important refinement of previous studies that have considered only one or two of them at a time. Principal findings are that age, period, and cohort have independent effects on migration and that the effects differ markedly by race. These findings have significant implications for the development of causal models of migration.
Bibliography Citation
Pitcher, Brian L., William F. Stinner and Michael B. Toney. "Patterns of Migration Propensity for Black and White American Men: Evidence from a Cohort Analysis." Research on Aging 7,1 (March 1985): 94-120.
4. Rhea, Victoria A.
Stinner, William F.
Toney, Michael B.
Poverty and Migration Among Metropolitan Young Adults: Race and Gender
Sine Loco, SL, Rural Sociological Society, 1988
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Rural Sociological Society
Keyword(s): Behavior; Gender Differences; Migration; Mobility; Mobility, Economic; Poverty; Racial Differences; Rural Sociology; Rural Youth; Rural/Urban Migration

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The relationship between migration behavior and economic mobility of poor and nonpoor nonmetropolitan youth is examined using data from the NLSY. The empirical analysis centers on respondents aged 18+ who are in the adult labor force. Within the poor and nonpoor groupings, gender and racial/ethnic differences are examined. While migration seems to have no effect on change in poverty status, it does have an effect for whites and for females. Although the effect for whites is positive, the effect for females can be either positive or negative. [Sociological Abstracts, Inc.]
Bibliography Citation
Rhea, Victoria A., William F. Stinner and Michael B. Toney. "Poverty and Migration Among Metropolitan Young Adults: Race and Gender." Sine Loco, SL, Rural Sociological Society, 1988.
5. Stinner, William F.
Transition to Retirement and Migration Behavior in the United States
Presented: New Delhi, India, Meetings of the International Sociological Association, 1986
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: International Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Behavior; Family Resources; Life Course; Life Cycle Research; Migration; Retirement; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Migration is often presumed to be linked to major transitions occurring throughout the life course. In postindustrial societies, one such prominent transition is retirement. Since little is known about the factors constraining or facilitating migration behavior in the context of the retirement transition, a model developed around a set of conditioning factors, including personal resources, socioeconomic bonds, environmental setting, and age, is tested on a sample of 2,000 United States males who entered retirement between 1967 and 1983.
Bibliography Citation
Stinner, William F. "Transition to Retirement and Migration Behavior in the United States." Presented: New Delhi, India, Meetings of the International Sociological Association, 1986.
6. Stinner, William F.
Byun, Yongchan
Transition to Retirement and Geographic Mobility
Presented: Madrid, Spain, International Sociological Association, 1990
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: International Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Migration; Mobility; Retirement

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Contributing to the literature on retirement timing and geographical mobility, data from the NLS of Older Men in the US are used to analyze the sequencing of retirement and geographical mobility among a subsample of 937 white men who had reached age 59 between 1966 and 1973, were still in the labor force in wage and salary employment, and were married. The subjects were followed for 10 years to examine the degree to which their retirement-moving patterns were affected by a selected set of individual, occupational, and environmental characteristics. Intervals were pooled (N = 2,829) and a discrete event-history analysis was conducted. Variations in effects were evident, dependent on type of sequencing and across type of mobility, i.e., local move, any migration, and interstate migration. [Sociological Abstracts, Inc.]
Bibliography Citation
Stinner, William F. and Yongchan Byun. "Transition to Retirement and Geographic Mobility." Presented: Madrid, Spain, International Sociological Association, 1990.
7. Stinner, William F.
Byun, Yongchan
Paita, Luis
Disability and Living Arrangements Among Elderly American Men
Research on Aging 12,3 (September 1990): 339-363.
Also: http://roa.sagepub.com/content/12/3/339.abstract
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Disability; Household Structure; Residence

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Four models that posit alternative ways in which disability might affect coresidence with adult relatives are discussed and tested for a pooled sample of 2,623 men (ages 65-74) drawn from the 1976 and 1981 rounds of the NLS of Older Men using descriptive and logistic regression techniques. Men with multiple disabling conditions, but not a single disability, were more likely to be coresiding with adult relatives than were non-disabled men, independent of a set selected background characteristics. Results provide general support for a model focusing on assistance norms, and it is suggested that the absence of a spouse reinforces this pattern. [Sociological Abstracts, Inc.]
Bibliography Citation
Stinner, William F., Yongchan Byun and Luis Paita. "Disability and Living Arrangements Among Elderly American Men." Research on Aging 12,3 (September 1990): 339-363.
8. Stinner, William F.
Khosroshahin, Mehdi
Selectivity Among Nonmetropolitan-Bound Male Migrants in the Middle and Later Years
Research on Aging 7,3 (September 1985): 472-488.
Also: http://roa.sagepub.com/content/7/3/472.abstract
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Age and Ageing; Life Cycle Research; Migration; Rural/Urban Differences; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Middle-aged and elderly individuals have played a prominent role in the non-metropolitan turnaround. The data for this study are drawn from the Older Men cohort of the NLS, and the analysis is focused on a pooled sample of two- year migration intervals extending from 1967-1975. Nonmetropolitan-bound migrants do not differ substantially from metropolitan nonmigrants, but differences observed are along life-cycle lines. In contrast, metropolitan to nonmetropolitan migrants differ from nonmetropolitan nonmigrants on both socioeconomic status and life-cycle attributes.
Bibliography Citation
Stinner, William F. and Mehdi Khosroshahin. "Selectivity Among Nonmetropolitan-Bound Male Migrants in the Middle and Later Years." Research on Aging 7,3 (September 1985): 472-488.
9. Stinner, William F.
Pitcher, Brian L.
Toney, Michael B.
Discriminators of Migration Propensity Among Black and White Men in the Middle and Later Years
Research on Aging 7,4 (December 1985): 535-562.
Also: http://roa.sagepub.com/content/7/4/535.abstract
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Age and Ageing; Migration

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The objective of this research is to increase our understanding of racial variations in the correlates of migration propensity among men passing through their middle and later years. An analytical model is developed around environmental disamenities, socioeconomic bonds, personal resources, and age. The results suggest the importance of determining the extent to which selected variables differentially discriminate migrants from nonmigrants dependent on race.
Bibliography Citation
Stinner, William F., Brian L. Pitcher and Michael B. Toney. "Discriminators of Migration Propensity Among Black and White Men in the Middle and Later Years." Research on Aging 7,4 (December 1985): 535-562.
10. Stinner, William F.
Toney, Michael B.
Cheong, Keywon
Direction of Migration and Occupational Mobility Among Young Adult White Males During the 1970s Nonmetropolitan Turnaround
In: Community, Society and Migration: Noneconomic Migration in America. P. Jobes, W. Stinner, and J. Wardwell, eds., Lanham, MD: University Press of America, 1992: 47-84
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: University Press of America
Keyword(s): Migration; Migration Patterns; Mobility, Occupational; Socioeconomic Factors

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Bibliography Citation
Stinner, William F., Michael B. Toney and Keywon Cheong. "Direction of Migration and Occupational Mobility Among Young Adult White Males During the 1970s Nonmetropolitan Turnaround" In: Community, Society and Migration: Noneconomic Migration in America. P. Jobes, W. Stinner, and J. Wardwell, eds., Lanham, MD: University Press of America, 1992: 47-84
11. Toney, Michael B.
Golesorkhi, Banu
Stinner, William F.
Residence Exposure and Fertility Expectations of Young Mormon and Non-Mormon Women in Utah
Journal of Marriage and Family 47,2 (May 1985): 459-465.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/352144
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: National Council on Family Relations
Keyword(s): Family Size; Fertility; Religious Influences; Residence; Women; Women's Roles; Women's Studies

Utah's fertility rate is about double the nation's, and it increased during the 1970s as the nation's fertility declined. The fertility expectations of young non-Mormon females living in this setting (2.4 children) resemble those of young females in the nation as a whole, rather than the expectations of the young Mormon females in Utah (4.4 children). Significant differences between Utah's young Mormon and non-Mormon females remain after adjusting for other variables. These findings suggest: (1) that residence in a high fertility area per se does not affect fertility; and (2) that Mormon/non-Mormon fertility differences are likely to persist into the foreseeable future. The principal data for this study comes from a Utah survey. Secondary data from the 1979 NLSY are added for comparative reasons.
Bibliography Citation
Toney, Michael B., Banu Golesorkhi and William F. Stinner. "Residence Exposure and Fertility Expectations of Young Mormon and Non-Mormon Women in Utah." Journal of Marriage and Family 47,2 (May 1985): 459-465.
12. Toney, Michael B.
Pitcher, Brian L.
Stinner, William F.
Geographic Mobility and Locus of Control
Journal of Psychology 119,4 (1986): 361-368
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: Heldref Publications
Keyword(s): Demography; Locus of Control (see Rotter Scale); Migration; Mobility; Rotter Scale (see Locus of Control); Self-Perception

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Migrants and nonmigrants are often alleged to differ on numerous psychological traits; little empirical analysis, however, has examined this possibility. This study examined the hypothesis that geographic mobility is associated with locus of control, a key dimension of the self-concept. No relationships between these variables were uncovered for a national sample of older white men.
Bibliography Citation
Toney, Michael B., Brian L. Pitcher and William F. Stinner. "Geographic Mobility and Locus of Control." Journal of Psychology 119,4 (1986): 361-368.
13. Toney, Michael B.
Stinner, William F.
Pitcher, Brian L.
A Test of the Axiom of Cumulative Inertia across Metropolitan and Nonmetropolitan Settings
Presented: San Francisco, CA, Meetings of the Rural Sociological Society, 1982
Cohort(s): Young Men
Publisher: Rural Sociological Society
Keyword(s): Life Cycle Research; Migration; Residence; Rural Sociology; Rural/Urban Differences; Rural/Urban Migration

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Little research has included place attributes as a factor in analysis of the relationship between duration of residence and migration. Yet most migration theories portray migration as largely a response to place attributes. This paper examines one of the most important place attributes: metropolitan/nonmetropolitan classification. Life cycle status, education, employment status, occupational status, parents' socioeconomic status, and size of place of residence at age 14 are also considered. Using data from the NLS of Young Men, the results yield further evidence in support of the "axiom of cumulative inertia." Within both settings, migration propensities decline as duration of residence increases. However, comparison of duration of residence-specific propensities of SMSA and non-SMSA residents reveals similar propensities at all durations except the shortest. This finding is somewhat surprising since much literature suggests that integrating into nonmetropolitan communities should occur more readily.
Bibliography Citation
Toney, Michael B., William F. Stinner and Brian L. Pitcher. "A Test of the Axiom of Cumulative Inertia across Metropolitan and Nonmetropolitan Settings." Presented: San Francisco, CA, Meetings of the Rural Sociological Society, 1982.