Search Results

Source: Demographic Research
Resulting in 11 citations.
1. Amorim, Mariana
Dunifon, Rachel
Pilkauskas, Natasha
The Magnitude and Timing of Grandparental Coresidence during Childhood in the United States
Demographic Research 37, Article 52 (5 December 2017): 1695-1706.
Also: https://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol37/52/default.htm
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research
Keyword(s): Childhood Residence; Coresidence; Family Structure; Grandparents; Household Composition; Household Structure

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objective: We calculate the cumulative and age-specific probabilities of coresidence with grandparents during childhood. We stratify our analyses by types of grandparent-grandchild living arrangements (grandfamilies and three-generation households) and by race and ethnicity.

Methods: We use two data sets -- the pooled 2010-2015 American Community Surveys (ACS) and the 1997 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY-97) -- and produce estimates using life tables techniques.

Results: Results indicate that nearly 30% of US children ever coreside with grandparents. Both three-generation and grandfamily living arrangements are more prevalent among racial and ethnic minority groups, with three-generation coresidence particularly common among Asian children. Black children are nearly two times as likely to ever live in a grandfamily as compared to Hispanic and white children, respectively. Children are much more likely to experience grandparental coresidence during their first year of life than in any other year.

Bibliography Citation
Amorim, Mariana, Rachel Dunifon and Natasha Pilkauskas. "The Magnitude and Timing of Grandparental Coresidence during Childhood in the United States." Demographic Research 37, Article 52 (5 December 2017): 1695-1706.
2. Gough, Margaret
Birth Spacing, Human Capital, and the Motherhood Penalty at Midlife in the United States
Demographic Research 37, Article 13 (July-December 2017): 363-416.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/26332200
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research
Keyword(s): Age at First Birth; Births, Repeat / Spacing; Human Capital; Labor Market Outcomes; Motherhood; Wage Penalty/Career Penalty

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The objective [of this article] is to estimate the effects of birth spacing on midlife labor market outcomes and assess the extent to which these effects vary by education and age at first birth.
Bibliography Citation
Gough, Margaret. "Birth Spacing, Human Capital, and the Motherhood Penalty at Midlife in the United States." Demographic Research 37, Article 13 (July-December 2017): 363-416.
3. Han, Siqi
Tumin, Dmitry
Qian, Zhenchao
Gendered Transitions to Adulthood by College Field of Study in the United States
Demographic Research 35, Article 31 (July-December 2016): 929-960.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/26332099
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research
Keyword(s): College Graduates; College Major/Field of Study/Courses; Gender Differences; Marriage; Parenthood; STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics); Transition, Adulthood

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objective: The current study examines gendered influences of college field of study on transitions to a series of adult roles, including full-time work, marriage, and parenthood.

Methods: We use Cox proportional hazards models and multinomial logistic regression to examine gendered associations between field of study and the three transitions among college graduates of the NLSY97 (National Longitudinal Survey of Youth) cohort.

Results: Men majoring in STEM achieve early transitions to full-time work, marriage, and parenthood; women majoring in STEM show no significant advantage in finding full-time work and delayed marriage and childbearing; women in business have earlier transitions to full-time work and marriage than women in other fields, demonstrating an advantage similar to that of men in STEM.

Bibliography Citation
Han, Siqi, Dmitry Tumin and Zhenchao Qian. "Gendered Transitions to Adulthood by College Field of Study in the United States." Demographic Research 35, Article 31 (July-December 2016): 929-960.
4. Hynes, Kathryn
Joyner, Kara
Peters, H. Elizabeth
Deleone, Felicia Yang
The Transition to Early Fatherhood: National Estimates Based on Multiple Surveys
Demographic Research 18,12 (29 April 2008): 337-376.
Also: http://www.demographic-research.org/Volumes/Vol18/12/18-12.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Age at First Intercourse; Data Analysis; Family Background; Fatherhood; Fathers; Gender; Male Sample; National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG); Racial Studies

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study provides systematic information about the prevalence of early male fertility and the relationship between family background characteristics and early parenthood across three widely used data sources: the 1979 and 1997 National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth and the 2002 National Survey of Family Growth. We provide descriptive statistics on early fertility by age, sex, race, cohort, and data set. Because each data set includes birth cohorts with varying early fertility rates, prevalence estimates for early male fertility are relatively similar across data sets. Associations between background characteristics and early fertility in regression models are less consistent across data sets. We discuss the implications of these findings for scholars doing research on early male fertility. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

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Bibliography Citation
Hynes, Kathryn, Kara Joyner, H. Elizabeth Peters and Felicia Yang Deleone. "The Transition to Early Fatherhood: National Estimates Based on Multiple Surveys." Demographic Research 18,12 (29 April 2008): 337-376.
5. Jang, Bohyun
Casterline, John
Snyder, Anastasia R.
Migration and Marriage: Modeling the Joint Process
Demographic Research 30,47 (30 April 2014): 1339-1366.
Also: http://www.demographic-research.org/Volumes/Vol30/47/
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research
Keyword(s): Life Course; Marriage; Migration

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We will investigate the relationship between migration and marriage in the United States, using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979. We allow for interdependency between the two events and examine whether unobserved common factors affect the estimates of both migration and marriage.
Bibliography Citation
Jang, Bohyun, John Casterline and Anastasia R. Snyder. "Migration and Marriage: Modeling the Joint Process." Demographic Research 30,47 (30 April 2014): 1339-1366.
6. Lemmon, Megan
Whyman, Mira
Teachman, Jay D.
Active-Duty Military Service in the United States: Cohabiting Unions and the Transition to Marriage
Demographic Research 20,10 (February 2009). DOI: 10.4054/DemRes.2009.20.10.
Also: http://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol20/10/20-10.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research
Keyword(s): All-Volunteer Force (AVF); Cohabitation; Marriage; Military Service; Undergraduate Research

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

A small but growing body of research has begun to identify the consequences of military service during the all-voluntary era. Previous literature has emphasized the role played by the economic prospects of men in stimulating marriage, among both singles and cohabiters. Military service and marriage are related through pay rates, stability of employment and additional benefits awarded to married couples. In this article, we examine the relationship between military service and the likelihood that cohabiting unions will be converted into marriages. Our paper extends previous research by making a distinction between the effects of active-duty verses reserve-duty service on the transition to marriage using data from the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY). Our findings indicate that there is a positive relationship between active-duty service and cohabitors transitioning to marriage.
Bibliography Citation
Lemmon, Megan, Mira Whyman and Jay D. Teachman. "Active-Duty Military Service in the United States: Cohabiting Unions and the Transition to Marriage." Demographic Research 20,10 (February 2009). DOI: 10.4054/DemRes.2009.20.10.
7. Mernitz, Sara E.
A Cohort Comparison of Trends in First Cohabitation Duration in the United States
Demographic Research 38 (27 June 2018): 2073-2086.
Also: https://www.jstor.org/stable/26457100
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research
Keyword(s): Cohabitation; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Socioeconomic Factors; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objective: This study investigates US first cohabitation duration between young adults born in the 1950s and young adults born in the 1980s and how socioeconomic resources contribute to cohabitation duration by cohort.

Methods: Using data from the National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth 1979 and 1997, I employ life table estimates and competing-risks Cox proportional hazard models to study how cohabitation during and transitions out of cohabitation have changed over time.

Bibliography Citation
Mernitz, Sara E. "A Cohort Comparison of Trends in First Cohabitation Duration in the United States ." Demographic Research 38 (27 June 2018): 2073-2086.
8. Nauck, Bernhard
Groepler, Nicolai
Yi, Chin-Chun
How Kinship Systems and Welfare Regimes Shape Leaving Home: A Comparative Study of the United States, Germany, Taiwan, and China
Demographic Research 36, Article 38 (January-June 2017): 1109-1148.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/26332161
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research
Keyword(s): Cross-national Analysis; Germany, German; Household Composition; Kinship; Residence, Return to Parental Home/Delayed Homeleaving; Taiwanese Youth Project; Transition, Adulthood

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper aims to explain societal differences in the event of leaving the parental home as part of the transition to adulthood, in the United States, Germany, China, and Taiwan. It proposes bridge hypotheses between societal characteristics such as kinship system and welfare regime and home-leaving behavior, and tests them with nationally representative panel studies.
Bibliography Citation
Nauck, Bernhard, Nicolai Groepler and Chin-Chun Yi. "How Kinship Systems and Welfare Regimes Shape Leaving Home: A Comparative Study of the United States, Germany, Taiwan, and China." Demographic Research 36, Article 38 (January-June 2017): 1109-1148.
9. Van Winkle, Zachary
Struffolino, Emanuela
When Working Isn't Enough: Family Demographic Processes and In-Work Poverty Across the Life Course in the United States
Demographic Research 39 (2018): 365-380.
Also: https://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol39/12/default.htm
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research
Keyword(s): Family Process Measures; Life Course; Marriage; Parenthood; Poverty

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objective: We estimate the risk of in-work poverty in the United States over the life course as a function of family demographic processes, namely leaving the parental home, union formation and dissolution, and the transition to parenthood.

Methods: We use data from the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79) and fixed effects regression models with interactions between age and each family demographic process to estimate age-specific associations between these processes and the probability of in-work poverty.

Results: In-work poverty is a common phenomenon across the life courses of our study cohort: 20% of individuals are at risk of in-work poverty at every age. However, the risk generally decreases for men and increases for women across the life course. Leaving the parental home, entering parenthood, and separation increase, while marriage decreases the risk of in-work poverty. While the associations between marital statuses and in-work poverty are stable over the life course, the associations between parental home leaving and fertility with in-work poverty vary by age.

Bibliography Citation
Van Winkle, Zachary and Emanuela Struffolino. "When Working Isn't Enough: Family Demographic Processes and In-Work Poverty Across the Life Course in the United States." Demographic Research 39 (2018): 365-380.
10. Wolfe, Joseph D.
Bauldry, Shawn
Hardy, Melissa A.
Pavalko, Eliza K.
Multigenerational Socioeconomic Attainments and Mortality Among Older Men: An Adjacent Generations Approach
Demographic Research 39 (2018): 719-752.
Also: https://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol39/26/default.htm
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research
Keyword(s): Educational Attainment; Mortality; Occupations; Socioeconomic Background

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objective: We develop a new approach to understanding family attainments and mortality in later life and test the multigenerational structure of health disparities suggested by the long arm, personal attainment, and social foreground perspectives.

Methods: The analysis uses nearly complete mortality data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Older Men, a representative sample of US men aged 45 to 59 in 1966.

Results: We find that older men with parents who farmed had a median age of death that was 1.3 years higher than those who had parents with manual occupations, and men with adult children who had 16 or more years of schooling had a median age of death almost 2 years higher than those with children with 12 or fewer years of schooling.

Bibliography Citation
Wolfe, Joseph D., Shawn Bauldry, Melissa A. Hardy and Eliza K. Pavalko. "Multigenerational Socioeconomic Attainments and Mortality Among Older Men: An Adjacent Generations Approach." Demographic Research 39 (2018): 719-752.
11. Yu, Wei-hsin
Sun, Shengwei
Fertility Responses to Individual and Contextual Unemployment: Differences by Socioeconomic Background
Demographic Research 39 (25 October 2018): 927-962.
Also: https://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol39/35/default.htm
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research
Keyword(s): Childbearing; Educational Attainment; Fertility; Geocoded Data; Modeling, Hazard/Event History/Survival/Duration; Unemployment; Unemployment Rate, Regional

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objective: In this study we specifically ask whether fertility timings in the United States are more sensitive to the unemployment rates of individuals' immediate surroundings or to their own unemployment. Moreover, we investigate whether young adults with different educational levels and parental resources may adjust their childbearing timing differently in response to their own employment status and local unemployment rates.

Methods: Using 17 rounds of data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997, we fit discrete-time event history models predicting men's and women's pace of childbearing.

Results: The analysis indicates that relatively disadvantaged young adults, such as those with low education or parents with low education, tend to delay childbirth in response to high local unemployment rates but are less likely than the more advantaged to defer childbearing when facing their own unemployment.

Bibliography Citation
Yu, Wei-hsin and Shengwei Sun. "Fertility Responses to Individual and Contextual Unemployment: Differences by Socioeconomic Background." Demographic Research 39 (25 October 2018): 927-962.