Search Results

Author: Hynes, Kathryn
Resulting in 7 citations.
1. Astone, Nan Marie
Dariotis, Jacinda K.
Sonenstein, Freya L.
Pleck, Joseph H.
Hynes, Kathryn
Men's Work Efforts and the Transition to Fatherhood
Journal of Family and Economic Issues 31,1 (March 2010): 3-13.
Also: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s10834-009-9174-7
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Kluwer Academic Publishers
Keyword(s): Fatherhood; Marital Status; Marriage; Work Ethic

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

In this paper we tested three hypotheses: (a) the transition to fatherhood is associated with an increase in work effort; (b) the positive association (if any) between the transition to fatherhood and work effort is greater for fathers who are married at the time of the transition; and (c) the association (if any) is greater for men who make the transition at younger ages. The data are from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 Cohort. The transition to fatherhood was associated with an increase in work effort among young unmarried men, but not for married men. Among married men who were on-time fathers, work effort decreased. Among childless men, the marriage transition was associated with increased work effort.
Bibliography Citation
Astone, Nan Marie, Jacinda K. Dariotis, Freya L. Sonenstein, Joseph H. Pleck and Kathryn Hynes. "Men's Work Efforts and the Transition to Fatherhood." Journal of Family and Economic Issues 31,1 (March 2010): 3-13.
2. Clarkberg, Marin
Hynes, Kathryn
Childbearing and Women's Employment: Parity Differences in Job Exits
Presented: Atlanta, GA, Population Association of America Annual Meetings, May 2002
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Exits; Fertility; First Birth; Maternal Employment

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Childbearing reduces female labor force participation, but most mothers will both return to work and bear another child. Yet, little is known about how higher parity births affect maternal employment. We consider two explanations for the negative impact of childbearing on female employment. First, families compare the gains to female employment to the costs of "outside" child care. Second, some women have an underlying preference to stay home look at the onset of childbearing as an opportunity to exit the work force. These processes work together to contribute to job exits around a first birth, but the balance of these forces may change as parity increases, as many mothers have left the work force already. To examine these processes, we estimate continuous time event historical models of job exits surrounding first versus higher parity births using data on women from the 1979 through 1998 waves of the NLSY.
Bibliography Citation
Clarkberg, Marin and Kathryn Hynes. "Childbearing and Women's Employment: Parity Differences in Job Exits." Presented: Atlanta, GA, Population Association of America Annual Meetings, May 2002.
3. Hynes, Kathryn
Patterns and Predictors of Women's Employment during Early Parenthood: An Application of the Group-Based Trajectory Method
Presented: Minneapolis, MN, Population Association of America Meetings, May 2003
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Age at First Birth; Maternal Employment; Modeling, Logit; Mothers, Education

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Research on womens employment during early parenthood frequently focuses on the correlates and consequences of decisions at a particular time, such as around a birth. This paper applies a new group-based trajectory method (Nagin 1999) in order to examine womens employment trajectories across the period of early parenthood. We focus on six distinct trajectories around first and second births that span the employment continuum. Only about half of the mothers in our sample followed trajectories characterized by either continuous employment through the period surrounding a birth or by a sharp decline in employment closely corresponding to the birth event (whether followed by a rapid return or not). Preliminary descriptive analyses indicate that age at first birth, income and education are strongly associated with different employment trajectories. Our next step is to estimate multinomial logistic regression models, examining predictors of trajectory type.
Bibliography Citation
Hynes, Kathryn. "Patterns and Predictors of Women's Employment during Early Parenthood: An Application of the Group-Based Trajectory Method." Presented: Minneapolis, MN, Population Association of America Meetings, May 2003.
4. Hynes, Kathryn
Clarkberg, Marin
Women's Employment Patterns During Early Parenthood: A Group-Based Trajectory Analysis
Journal of Marriage and Family 67,1 (February 2005): 222-240.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3600148
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: National Council on Family Relations
Keyword(s): Age at First Birth; Educational Attainment; Employment, History; Labor Force Participation; Maternal Employment; Parenthood

Research on women's employment and parenthood frequently focuses on the correlates and consequences of decisions at a particular time, such as a birth. This article applies a group-based trajectory method to examine women's employment trajectories across the period of early parenthood using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (N= 2,093). We find that throughout early parenthood, women exhibit significant movement into and out of the labor force. Factors that typically predict women's employment status, such as age at first birth and education, are also good predictors of women's employment patterns. We discuss the implications of these findings for future research, particularly on the use of a static measure of women's or couples' employment status. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Hynes, Kathryn and Marin Clarkberg. "Women's Employment Patterns During Early Parenthood: A Group-Based Trajectory Analysis." Journal of Marriage and Family 67,1 (February 2005): 222-240.
5. Hynes, Kathryn
Joyner, Kara
Peters, H. Elizabeth
Deleone, Felicia Yang
The Transition to Early Fatherhood: National Estimates Based on Multiple Surveys
Demographic Research 18,12 (29 April 2008): 337-376.
Also: http://www.demographic-research.org/Volumes/Vol18/12/18-12.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Age at First Intercourse; Data Analysis; Family Background; Fatherhood; Fathers; Gender; Male Sample; National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG); Racial Studies

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study provides systematic information about the prevalence of early male fertility and the relationship between family background characteristics and early parenthood across three widely used data sources: the 1979 and 1997 National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth and the 2002 National Survey of Family Growth. We provide descriptive statistics on early fertility by age, sex, race, cohort, and data set. Because each data set includes birth cohorts with varying early fertility rates, prevalence estimates for early male fertility are relatively similar across data sets. Associations between background characteristics and early fertility in regression models are less consistent across data sets. We discuss the implications of these findings for scholars doing research on early male fertility. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

Copyright of Demographic Research is the property of Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts)

Bibliography Citation
Hynes, Kathryn, Kara Joyner, H. Elizabeth Peters and Felicia Yang Deleone. "The Transition to Early Fatherhood: National Estimates Based on Multiple Surveys." Demographic Research 18,12 (29 April 2008): 337-376.
6. Joyner, Kara
Peters, H. Elizabeth
Hynes, Kathryn
Sikora, Asia
Taber, Jamie Rubenstein
Rendall, Michael S.
The Quality of Male Fertility Data in Major U.S. Surveys
Demography 49,1 (February 2012): 101-124.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/n52u383172070883/
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Census of Population; Data Quality/Consistency; Fathers; Fathers, Biological; Fertility; Methods/Methodology; Monte Carlo; National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Researchers continue to question fathers’ willingness to report their biological children in surveys and the ability of surveys to adequately represent fathers. To address these concerns, this study evaluates the quality of men’s fertility data in the 1979 and 1997 cohorts of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79 and NLSY97) and in the 2002 National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG). Comparing fertility rates in each survey with population rates based on data from Vital Statistics and the U.S. Census Bureau, we document how the incomplete reporting of births in different surveys varies according to men’s characteristics, including their age, race, marital status, and birth cohort. In addition, we use Monte Carlo simulations based on the NSFG data to demonstrate how birth underreporting biases associations between early parenthood and its antecedents. We find that in the NSFG, roughly four out of five early births were reported; but in the NLSY79 and NLSY97, almost nine-tenths of early births were reported. In all three surveys, incomplete reporting was especially pronounced for nonmarital births. Our results suggest that the quality of male fertility data is strongly linked to survey design and that it has implications for models of early male fertility.
Bibliography Citation
Joyner, Kara, H. Elizabeth Peters, Kathryn Hynes, Asia Sikora, Jamie Rubenstein Taber and Michael S. Rendall. "The Quality of Male Fertility Data in Major U.S. Surveys ." Demography 49,1 (February 2012): 101-124.
7. Joyner, Kara
Peters, H. Elizabeth
Sikora, Asia
Hynes, Kathryn
Rubenstein, Jamie C.
The Quality of Male Fertility Data in Major U.S. Surveys
Presented: Dallas, TX, Population Association of America Meetings, April 2010
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Age and Ageing; Age at Birth; Census of Population; Data Quality/Consistency; Ethnic Differences; Fatherhood; Fathers; Fathers and Children; Fertility; Marital Status; Methods/Methodology; Monte Carlo; National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG); Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Researchers continue to question fathers' willingness to report their biological children in surveys, and the ability of surveys to adequately represent them. To address these concerns, this study evaluates the quality of men's fertility data in the 1979 and 1997 Cohorts of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79 and NLSY97), and in the 2002 National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG). Comparing fertility rates in each survey to population rates based on the data from the National Center for Health Statistics and the U.S. Census Bureau, we document how the undercount of births to men in different surveys varies according to several of their characteristics, including their age, race/ethnicity, marital status, and birth cohort. In addition, we use Monte Carlo simulations based on the NSFG data to demonstrate how birth undercounting biases associations between early parenthood and its antecedents.
Bibliography Citation
Joyner, Kara, H. Elizabeth Peters, Asia Sikora, Kathryn Hynes and Jamie C. Rubenstein. "The Quality of Male Fertility Data in Major U.S. Surveys." Presented: Dallas, TX, Population Association of America Meetings, April 2010.