Search Results

Author: Tumin, Dmitry
Resulting in 12 citations.
1. Han, Siqi
Tumin, Dmitry
Qian, Zhenchao
Gendered Transitions to Adulthood by College Field of Study
Presented: Washington DC, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, March-April 2016
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): College Graduates; College Major/Field of Study/Courses; Gender Differences; STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics); Transition, Adulthood

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

College graduates' experiences in the labor market are stratified by field of study, and field of study in turn determines the timing of transitions to marriage and parenthood. We use the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1997 Cohort to investigate gendered influences of college field of study on transitions to a series of adult roles, including full-time work, marriage, and parenthood. Among men majoring in science, technology, engineering, or mathematics (STEM), we find evidence of role complementarity, with early achievement of full-time work accompanied by earlier family formation. By contrast, women majoring in STEM reap fewer rewards with respect to finding full-time work, and delay marriage and childbearing. Women in business demonstrate role complementarity similar to that of men majoring in STEM. The contrast between women in STEM and business suggests that women's decisions regarding marriage and parenthood do not respond uniformly to the economic prospects of their work.

Also presented at Seattle WA, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2016.

Bibliography Citation
Han, Siqi, Dmitry Tumin and Zhenchao Qian. "Gendered Transitions to Adulthood by College Field of Study." Presented: Washington DC, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, March-April 2016.
2. Han, Siqi
Tumin, Dmitry
Qian, Zhenchao
Gendered Transitions to Adulthood by College Field of Study in the United States
Demographic Research 35, Article 31 (July-December 2016): 929-960.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/26332099
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research
Keyword(s): College Graduates; College Major/Field of Study/Courses; Gender Differences; Marriage; Parenthood; STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics); Transition, Adulthood

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objective: The current study examines gendered influences of college field of study on transitions to a series of adult roles, including full-time work, marriage, and parenthood.

Methods: We use Cox proportional hazards models and multinomial logistic regression to examine gendered associations between field of study and the three transitions among college graduates of the NLSY97 (National Longitudinal Survey of Youth) cohort.

Results: Men majoring in STEM achieve early transitions to full-time work, marriage, and parenthood; women majoring in STEM show no significant advantage in finding full-time work and delayed marriage and childbearing; women in business have earlier transitions to full-time work and marriage than women in other fields, demonstrating an advantage similar to that of men in STEM.

Bibliography Citation
Han, Siqi, Dmitry Tumin and Zhenchao Qian. "Gendered Transitions to Adulthood by College Field of Study in the United States." Demographic Research 35, Article 31 (July-December 2016): 929-960.
3. Tumin, Dmitry
Multiple Marital Dissolutions and Midlife Health
M.A Thesis, The Ohio State University, 2011.
Also: http://etd.ohiolink.edu/send-pdf.cgi/Tumin%20Dmitry.pdf?osu1296507240
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Department of Sociology, The Ohio State University
Keyword(s): Depression (see also CESD); Divorce; Health Factors; Marital Dissolution; Marriage

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Marriage is strongly associated with better health. In part, this is due to the harmful effects of marital dissolutions. As remarriage becomes more common, so do multiple marital exits. It is unclear if more marital dissolutions lead to worse health. In this paper, I test whether multiple marital dissolutions – divorces and separations – exert a cumulative effect on health at midlife. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth ‘79, I find that depression and low self-rated health at midlife are less prevalent among the continuously married than among those who have ever experienced a marital dissolution. However, I find no evidence of a cumulative effect on health. Higher-order marital dissolutions appear to have less of an effect on health than first dissolutions. Stress and resource theories suggest people may adapt to a first dissolution in ways that reduce health harm from future dissolutions.
Bibliography Citation
Tumin, Dmitry. Multiple Marital Dissolutions and Midlife Health. M.A Thesis, The Ohio State University, 2011..
4. Tumin, Dmitry
Han, Siqi
Qian, Zhenchao
Estimates and Meanings of Marital Separation
Journal of Marriage and Family 77,1 (February 2015): 312-322.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jomf.12149/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Divorce; Marital History/Transitions; Marital Status; National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG); Research Methodology

Marital separation is an informal transition that may precede or substitute for divorce. Various surveys collect data on marital separation, but the data have produced mixed estimates. The authors used data from the 1995 and 2006 waves of the National Survey of Family Growth (N=2,216) and the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1979 cohort (NLSY79; N=1,990) to examine separations among women born between 1961 and 1965. In the National Survey of Family Growth, separations were typically short and followed by divorce. In the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1979 cohort, separations were longer and less likely to end in divorce. The authors relate these discrepancies to differences in study design, question universe, and question wording between the 2 surveys and show that different measures of separation lead to different conclusions about educational and racial/ethnic inequalities in the trajectories of marital disruption.
Bibliography Citation
Tumin, Dmitry, Siqi Han and Zhenchao Qian. "Estimates and Meanings of Marital Separation." Journal of Marriage and Family 77,1 (February 2015): 312-322.
5. Tumin, Dmitry
Han, Siqi
Qian, Zhenchao
Meanings and Measures of Marital Separation
Presented: Boston MA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, May 2014
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Marital Disruption; Marital Status; National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Marital separation is an informal disruption of a marriage that may precede or substitute for a divorce. Data on marital separation have been collected from community and nationally representative samples, but the differences among measures of separation have not been examined. Our study analyzes the prevalence, resolution and duration of marital separations among ever-married women born between 1961 and 1965, using data from nationally representative cross-sectional and longitudinal surveys. Many women report living apart from their first husband, but inferring separations from data on when couples stop living together overestimates marital separations relative to a longitudinal measure that lets respondents define “separation” themselves. Retrospective and longitudinal measures produce different estimates of the proportion of separations ending in divorce, and of separations’ median duration. These discrepancies point to a gap between people’s experience of living apart from their spouse and their perception of separation as a distinct marital state.
Bibliography Citation
Tumin, Dmitry, Siqi Han and Zhenchao Qian. "Meanings and Measures of Marital Separation." Presented: Boston MA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, May 2014.
6. Tumin, Dmitry
Qian, Zhenchao
Incidence, Predictors, and Resolution of Marital Separations
Presented: Denver CO, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2012
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Divorce; Marital Disruption; Marital Instability; Marital Status; Marriage

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Marital separation is legally and socially ambiguous. Does it indicate an end of a marriage or a process of reconciliation? Little is known about the duration of separation and why some initiate separation and some others move straight to divorce. We use data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 to explore marital separations in detail. Separation is commonplace: 60% of first marriages lead to separations and 54% of first divorces are preceded by separations. While half of separations last a year or less, some endure for ten years or longer, and may never resolve in a formal divorce. Minorities, women with young children, and the less educated tend to initiate separations rather than divorces and tend to remain separated longer. Our results call attention to separation as a long-term alternative to divorce in vulnerable and disadvantaged populations.
Bibliography Citation
Tumin, Dmitry and Zhenchao Qian. "Incidence, Predictors, and Resolution of Marital Separations." Presented: Denver CO, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2012.
7. Tumin, Dmitry
Qian, Zhenchao
Marital Separation, Divorce, and Health Consequences
Presented: San Francisco CA, Population Association of America Meetings, May 2012
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Divorce; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Marital Disruption; Marital Dissolution; Marital Instability

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Marital separation is legally and socially ambiguous. Does it indicate an end of a marriage or a process of reconciliation? Little is known about the duration of separation and why some initiate separation and others divorce right away. It is also unclear whether negative health consequences associated with divorce apply to separation. We explore marital separations in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 cohort. Separation is commonplace: 60% of first marriages lead to separations and 54% of first divorces are preceded by separations. Minorities, women with young children, and the less educated tend to separate rather than divorce and tend to remain separated longer. Negative health consequences of separation are statistically indistinguishable from those of divorce. Our results suggest that disadvantaged, vulnerable populations tend to remain separated and the health consequences are likely to be longer lasting for them than for those whose divorces were not preceded by separation.
Bibliography Citation
Tumin, Dmitry and Zhenchao Qian. "Marital Separation, Divorce, and Health Consequences." Presented: San Francisco CA, Population Association of America Meetings, May 2012.
8. Tumin, Dmitry
Qian, Zhenchao
Marital Transitions and Short-Term Weight Changes
Presented: Washington, DC, Population Association of America Annual Meetings, March 31-April 2, 2011
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Marital Disruption; Marital Instability; Mortality; Obesity; Weight

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Marital transitions cause changes in diet and activity patterns that affect weight. Marriage is linked to weight gain, while marital exit is linked to weight loss. But it is uncertain whether the weight changes that follow marital transitions are significant enough to affect health. We draw on the epidemiological literature to identify short-term weight changes linked to an increased risk of all-cause mortality. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth '79, we test whether recent marriages, divorces and separations affect the odds of experiencing various mortality-linked weight changes. We find that marriage predicts large weight gain and transition to obesity, outcomes that are linked to greater mortality risk. Notably, only a minority of newlyweds experience either outcome in the first two years of marriage. We also find that marital exits do not predict greater incidence of hazardous weight change, including weight loss, in early adulthood and midlife.
Bibliography Citation
Tumin, Dmitry and Zhenchao Qian. "Marital Transitions and Short-Term Weight Changes." Presented: Washington, DC, Population Association of America Annual Meetings, March 31-April 2, 2011.
9. Tumin, Dmitry
Qian, Zhenchao
Marital Transitions and Weight Changes
Presented: Las Vegas NV, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2011
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Divorce; Gender Differences; Marital Dissolution; Marriage; Weight

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Marital transitions cause changes in diet and activity patterns that affect weight. Previous studies show that marriage is linked to weight gain, while marital exit is linked to weight loss. But it is uncertain whether the weight changes that follow marital transitions are significant enough to affect health. Applying marital resource and crisis models, we explore weight changes that predict an increased risk of all-cause mortality in the epidemiological literature. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth ’79, we test whether recent marriages and marital exits affect the odds of experiencing mortality-linked weight changes and explore how sex and age at marital transition is associated with weight changes. We find marriage predicts large weight gain: large gains are more likely for newly married women than men, and more likely for those who married early than those who married later, but level off over time. Marital exits, on the other hand, do not predict weight loss, especially for those who divorce at later ages. We conclude that any marriage transition is, typically, not enough of a shock to lifestyle to elicit large and repeated weight gains.
Bibliography Citation
Tumin, Dmitry and Zhenchao Qian. "Marital Transitions and Weight Changes." Presented: Las Vegas NV, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2011.
10. Tumin, Dmitry
Qian, Zhenchao
Unemployment and the Transition From Separation to Divorce
Journal of Family Issues 38,10 (July 2017): 1389-1413.
Also: http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0192513X15600730
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Divorce; Gender Differences; Marital Disruption; Marital Status; Unemployment

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Informal marital separation often quickly leads to divorce, but can become long-lasting, especially among disadvantaged populations. In this study, we focus on the timing of divorce after separating and examine how unemployment before or during separation affects this pivotal moment in the divorce process. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1979 Cohort (N = 2,219), we track unemployment before and during separation and show that men's unemployment during separation, rather than women's, reduces the likelihood of divorce, independent of preseparation unemployment and other characteristics. For men, unemployment during a marital separation prolongs the divorce process, creating an extended period of uncertainty in marital relationships on the brink of dissolution. We discuss the gendered relationship observed between employment status during an informal separation and an estranged couple's decision to complete the divorce process.
Bibliography Citation
Tumin, Dmitry and Zhenchao Qian. "Unemployment and the Transition From Separation to Divorce." Journal of Family Issues 38,10 (July 2017): 1389-1413.
11. Tumin, Dmitry
Zheng, Hui
Do the Health Benefits of Marriage Depend on the Likelihood of Marriage?
Journal of Marriage and Family 80,3 (June 2018): 622-636.
Also: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/jomf.12471
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Health, Mental; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Marital Status; Marriage

Marriage promotion initiatives presume substantial health benefits of marriage. Current literature, however, has provided inconsistent results on whether these benefits would be shared by people unlikely to marry. We investigate whether the physical and mental health benefits of marriage depend on the likelihood of marriage. Whereas prior studies have compared health benefits of marriage across a single predictor of marriage chances, we define the likelihood of marriage as a composite of demographic, economic, and health characteristics. Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979, we find that married adults are only modestly healthier than unmarried adults in both physical and mental dimensions. People with a higher likelihood of marriage generally do not reap greater health benefits from marriage than their counterparts. The only exception is that continuous marriage is more strongly associated with improved mental health among men who are more likely to be married.
Bibliography Citation
Tumin, Dmitry and Hui Zheng. "Do the Health Benefits of Marriage Depend on the Likelihood of Marriage?" Journal of Marriage and Family 80,3 (June 2018): 622-636.
12. Tumin, Dmitry
Zheng, Hui
Propensity to Marry and Heterogeneity in the Health Benefits of Marriage
Presented: Boston MA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, May 2014
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Depression (see also CESD); Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Heterogeneity; Marriage; Propensity Scores

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Marriage is associated with good health, but the protective effect of marriage varies widely, such that some people experience substantial health benefits from marriage and others experience no benefit. Our study explores if the marriage effect on health is moderated by the likelihood of marrying. Using propensity score methods, we test for heterogeneity in the marriage effect on self-rated health and a scale of depressive symptoms in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1979 cohort. We find only modest differences in the marriage effect between the married and the unmarried, and no evidence that the marriage effect is positively or negatively associated with the propensity to marry. Our findings suggest that when the likelihood of marriage is defined as a composite of many early-life factors, it does not substantially moderate the health benefits of marriage, contradicting the hypothesis that the same factors discouraging marriage also make marriage less beneficial.
Bibliography Citation
Tumin, Dmitry and Hui Zheng. "Propensity to Marry and Heterogeneity in the Health Benefits of Marriage." Presented: Boston MA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, May 2014.