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Author: Sun, Shengwei
Resulting in 5 citations.
1. Sun, Shengwei
Changing Patterns, Persisting Logic: Racial Inequality in Young Men's Transition to Paid Care Work Jobs
Presented: Austin TX, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2019
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Occupations, Male; Occupations, Non-Traditional; Racial Equality/Inequality; Wage Penalty/Career Penalty; Wages, Men

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Men have slowly increased their presence in paid care work jobs that have long been considered as "women’s jobs" in the United States. This trend has taken place in the context of economic restructuring since the 1970s, with the U.S. job structure becoming polarized between "good" jobs and "bad" jobs in terms of pay and job security. The growth of paid care work jobs is characterized by racial disparity, but the mechanisms behind the racialized patterns remain unclear. Using individual-level data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 79 and 97, this study examines the determinants of entering low-paying versus well-paying care work jobs among two cohorts of young men who joined the workforce under different labor market conditions. Findings suggest changing patterns of racial inequality corresponding to larger job growth patterns since the 1980s. I argue that a persisting logic of a racialized "labor queue" underlies these changing patterns.
Bibliography Citation
Sun, Shengwei. "Changing Patterns, Persisting Logic: Racial Inequality in Young Men's Transition to Paid Care Work Jobs." Presented: Austin TX, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2019.
2. Sun, Shengwei
Intersecting Inequalities in the Paid Care Work Sector Under Changing Social and Economic Contexts
Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Sociology, University of Maryland, College Park, 2018.
Also: https://drum.lib.umd.edu/handle/1903/21305
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: University of Maryland
Keyword(s): Gender Attitudes/Roles; Occupations, Male; Occupations, Non-Traditional; Racial Equality/Inequality

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This dissertation focuses on the expanding paid care work sector as a key terrain for examining labor market inequalities in the United States and China, with three papers attending to different aspects of social stratification. In the U.S., men's presence in care work jobs remains rare despite the fast job growth in education and health care and the decline in traditionally male-dominated manufacturing sectors. Despite growing public interest, little is known about the reasons and pathways of men's transition into care work jobs. The popular discourse attributes men's reluctance to a matter of gender identity, whereas scholars adopting a structural approach argue that men have little incentive to enter care work jobs mainly because those jobs are underpaid. The first paper examines how well the structural and cultural approaches, respectively, explain why men enter care work jobs or not. Moreover, care work jobs have been increasingly polarized in terms of pay and job security since the 1970s, and the polarizing pattern of care work job growth is characterized by racial disparity. Is such pattern driven by racial disparity in education and labor market experience, and/or by racial discrimination? The second paper addresses this question by examining the changing determinants of entering into low-paying versus middle-to-high-paying care work jobs between two cohorts of young men who joined the workforce under different labor market conditions. Findings suggest a persisting logic of a racialized "labor queue" underlying the changing patterns of racial inequality.
Bibliography Citation
Sun, Shengwei. Intersecting Inequalities in the Paid Care Work Sector Under Changing Social and Economic Contexts. Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Sociology, University of Maryland, College Park, 2018..
3. Yu, Wei-hsin
Sun, Shengwei
Fertility Responses to Individual and Contextual Unemployment: Differences by Socioeconomic Background
Demographic Research 39 (25 October 2018): 927-962.
Also: https://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol39/35/default.htm
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research
Keyword(s): Childbearing; Educational Attainment; Fertility; Geocoded Data; Modeling, Hazard/Event History/Survival/Duration; Unemployment; Unemployment Rate, Regional

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objective: In this study we specifically ask whether fertility timings in the United States are more sensitive to the unemployment rates of individuals' immediate surroundings or to their own unemployment. Moreover, we investigate whether young adults with different educational levels and parental resources may adjust their childbearing timing differently in response to their own employment status and local unemployment rates.

Methods: Using 17 rounds of data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997, we fit discrete-time event history models predicting men's and women's pace of childbearing.

Results: The analysis indicates that relatively disadvantaged young adults, such as those with low education or parents with low education, tend to delay childbirth in response to high local unemployment rates but are less likely than the more advantaged to defer childbearing when facing their own unemployment.

Bibliography Citation
Yu, Wei-hsin and Shengwei Sun. "Fertility Responses to Individual and Contextual Unemployment: Differences by Socioeconomic Background." Demographic Research 39 (25 October 2018): 927-962.
4. Yu, Wei-hsin
Sun, Shengwei
Race-Ethnicity, Class, and Unemployment Dynamics: Do Macroeconomic Shifts Alter Existing Disadvantages?
Research in Social Stratification and Mobility 63 (October 2019): DOI: 10.1016/j.rssm.2019.100422.
Also: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0276562418301999
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Ethnic Differences; Geocoded Data; Local Area Unemployment; Racial Differences; Socioeconomic Status (SES); Unemployment Rate; Unemployment Rate, Regional

Research indicates that individuals of different races, ethnic backgrounds, and class origins differ in their unemployment rates. We know less, however, about whether these differences result from the differing groups' unequal hazards of entering or exiting unemployment and even less about how economic fluctuations moderate the ethnoracial and class-origin gaps in the long-term risks of transitioning into and out of unemployment. Using Rounds 1–17 of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 and event history models, we show that non-Hispanic blacks become more similar to non-Hispanic whites in their paces of entering unemployment as their local unemployment rate rises, perhaps because jobs largely closed to the former are eliminated in a greater proportion during recessions. Nonetheless, blacks’ relatively slow pace of transitioning from unemployment to having a job decelerates further with economic downturns. By contrast, Hispanics' paces of entering and exiting unemployment relative to non-Hispanic whites hardly change with local unemployment rates, despite unemployed Hispanics’ slower rate of transitioning to having a job. With respect to class origin, we find that the advantages in both unemployment entry and recovery of young men with relatively educated parents diminish with economic deterioration.
Bibliography Citation
Yu, Wei-hsin and Shengwei Sun. "Race-Ethnicity, Class, and Unemployment Dynamics: Do Macroeconomic Shifts Alter Existing Disadvantages?" Research in Social Stratification and Mobility 63 (October 2019): DOI: 10.1016/j.rssm.2019.100422.
5. Yu, Wei-hsin
Sun, Shengwei
Unemployment and Childbearing: Whose Unemployment Matters and to Whom Does It Matter?
Presented: Denver CO, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2018
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Childbearing; Fertility; Geocoded Data; Unemployment; Unemployment Rate, Regional

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Few studies distinguish the effects of individuals' own unemployment and their surroundings' unemployment levels on their fertility, and even fewer examine how different social groups may react to individual- and aggregate-level unemployment differently. Using data from the NLSY97 and an improved measure of local unemployment rates, we investigate how men's and women's paces of childbearing correspond to their own unemployment status and unemployment incidents around them. The analysis indicates that individuals, especially women, with more labor market disadvantages, such as having low education or parents with low education, tend to delay childbirths in response to high local unemployment rates, but they are less likely than the more advantaged to deter childbearing when facing their own unemployment. We argue that these differences reflect the fact that the disadvantaged tend to suffer more from unemployment in times of economic turmoil, while having lower prospects of economic improvement once having become unemployed.
Bibliography Citation
Yu, Wei-hsin and Shengwei Sun. "Unemployment and Childbearing: Whose Unemployment Matters and to Whom Does It Matter?" Presented: Denver CO, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2018.