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Author: Amorim, Mariana
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. Amorim, Mariana
Dunifon, Rachel
Pilkauskas, Natasha
The Magnitude and Timing of Grandparental Coresidence during Childhood in the United States
Demographic Research 37, Article 52 (5 December 2017): 1695-1706.
Also: https://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol37/52/default.htm
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research
Keyword(s): Childhood Residence; Coresidence; Family Structure; Grandparents; Household Composition; Household Structure

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objective: We calculate the cumulative and age-specific probabilities of coresidence with grandparents during childhood. We stratify our analyses by types of grandparent-grandchild living arrangements (grandfamilies and three-generation households) and by race and ethnicity.

Methods: We use two data sets -- the pooled 2010-2015 American Community Surveys (ACS) and the 1997 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY-97) -- and produce estimates using life tables techniques.

Results: Results indicate that nearly 30% of US children ever coreside with grandparents. Both three-generation and grandfamily living arrangements are more prevalent among racial and ethnic minority groups, with three-generation coresidence particularly common among Asian children. Black children are nearly two times as likely to ever live in a grandfamily as compared to Hispanic and white children, respectively. Children are much more likely to experience grandparental coresidence during their first year of life than in any other year.

Bibliography Citation
Amorim, Mariana, Rachel Dunifon and Natasha Pilkauskas. "The Magnitude and Timing of Grandparental Coresidence during Childhood in the United States." Demographic Research 37, Article 52 (5 December 2017): 1695-1706.
2. Amorim, Mariana
Dunifon, Rachel
Pilkauskas, Natasha
The Prevalence and Instability of Grandparental Coresidence During Childhood
Presented: Chicago IL, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2017
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): American Community Survey; Childhood; Coresidence; Grandparents; Household Structure; Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Cross-sectional estimates show that the share of children living with grandparents has risen over the last two decades, yet little is understood about a child's likelihood of ever living with a grandparent. In this paper, we calculate the cumulative and age-specific probabilities of coresidence with grandparents during childhood. We used the American Community Survey and the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth to create multi-decrement period life tables to study the prevalence and instability of grandparent coresidence. We examine differences between three-generation and grandfamily arrangements and explore patterns by race and ethnicity. Our results indicate that up to 31.5% of children ever co-reside with grandparents in either arrangement. We also find striking racial disparities in the probability of co-residing with grandparents that vary by type of grandparent household. Grandparental coresidence most commonly starts during the child's first year of life. Three-generation arrangements are highly unstable and short-lived.
Bibliography Citation
Amorim, Mariana, Rachel Dunifon and Natasha Pilkauskas. "The Prevalence and Instability of Grandparental Coresidence During Childhood." Presented: Chicago IL, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2017.
3. Tach, Laura
Amorim, Mariana
Multiple-partner Fertility and the Growth in Sibling Complexity
Presented: Montreal, QC, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2017
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Fertility, Multiple Partners; Siblings

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The transformation of the American family, fueled by cohabitation, divorce, and nonmarital childbearing, has created opportunities for parents to have children with more than one partner. Family scholars have documented the extent of maternal and paternal multiple-partner fertility in the US population, but we know less about these processes from the perspective of children, for whom parental multiple-partner fertility manifests as the presence of half-siblings. This paper uses the 1979 and 1997 Cohorts of the National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth to examine cohort change in children’s exposure to sibling complexity. We find that the probability of having a half-sibling increased by 30 percent between the two cohorts, with over one in four children now having at least one half-sibling by their 18th birthday. A strong educational gradient in sibling complexity persists across both cohorts, but large racial-ethnic disparities in sibling complexity have narrowed over time. Using demographic decomposition techniques, we find that the shifting racial-ethnic and socioeconomic composition of the U.S. population cannot explain the growth in sibling complexity. We conclude by discussing the shifting relationship contexts that have fueled sibling complexity and considering the implications for child development and social stratification. [Note: Also presented at Denver CO, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2018]
Bibliography Citation
Tach, Laura and Mariana Amorim. "Multiple-partner Fertility and the Growth in Sibling Complexity." Presented: Montreal, QC, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2017.