Search Results

Author: Joyner, Kara
Resulting in 9 citations.
1. Cawley, John
Joyner, Kara
Sobal, Jeffery
Size Matters: The Influence of Adolescents' Weight and Height on Dating and Sex
Rationality and Society 18,1 (February 2006): 67-94.
Also: http://rss.sagepub.com/cgi/reprint/18/1/67
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Dating; Height, Height-Weight Ratios; Obesity; Sexual Activity; Sexual Behavior

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We examine the relationship between body size (specifically, weight and height) and dating and sexual activity using two large, nationally representative, longitudinal data sets. Our conceptual framework assumes that the utility an adolescent derives from dating and sexual activity is a function of the weight and height of his or her partner, and it predicts that heavier and shorter adolescents will be less likely to date and have sex. Empirical tests confirm that dating is less likely among heavier girls and boys and among shorter girls and boys. In adolescent dating, size clearly matters. For sexual activity, the results are less consistent.
Bibliography Citation
Cawley, John, Kara Joyner and Jeffery Sobal. "Size Matters: The Influence of Adolescents' Weight and Height on Dating and Sex." Rationality and Society 18,1 (February 2006): 67-94.
2. Dariotis, Jacinda K.
Joyner, Kara
Curtin, Sally C.
Sonenstein, Freya L.
Moore, Kristin Anderson
Peters, H. Elizabeth
Sexual Behaviors Across 9 National Cohorts of Young Males and Females Ages 15-19
Presented: Washington, DC, Population Association of America Annual Meetings, March 31-April 2, 2011.
Also: http://paa2011.princeton.edu/download.aspx?submissionId=112016
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult, NLSY97
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Adolescent Sexual Activity; National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (AddHealth); National Survey of Adolescent Males (NSAM); National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG); Pregnancy, Adolescent; Sexual Behavior; Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Overview
Although adolescent pregnancy and STI/HIV transmission are preventable, (1) youth aged 15 to 24 contribute 18.9 million new STD cases in the US annually, (2) youth under age 20 account for 750,000 pregnancies a year, and (3) youth aged 15 to 24 were responsible for 20,000 new HIV cases, half of the 40,000 total, in 2006. What places these youth at risk are their sexual behaviors, with timing of first sex denoting the length of risk exposure.

Using nine nationally representative cohorts (NSLY79, NSAM88, NSFG88, NSAM95, NSFG95, ADD-Health, NLSY97, NSFG2002, and NLSY79YA), we examine cohort and sex differences in being sexually experienced and corroborate associations and trends across different data sets. Our samples are limited to male and female never-married youth ages 15 to 19 at the time they were reporting on their sexual behavior. We identify trends over time in being sexually experienced for 15 to 19 year old males and females. We find a monotonic decrease in the percent of 15-19 year old males being sexually experienced over cohorts. For females aged 15-19, we find an increase and then decrease from earlier to later cohorts. These results have significant implications for public health sexual outcomes among youth and for studies that examine sexually experienced youth, especially timing of first sex.

Bibliography Citation
Dariotis, Jacinda K., Kara Joyner, Sally C. Curtin, Freya L. Sonenstein, Kristin Anderson Moore and H. Elizabeth Peters. "Sexual Behaviors Across 9 National Cohorts of Young Males and Females Ages 15-19." Presented: Washington, DC, Population Association of America Annual Meetings, March 31-April 2, 2011.
3. Hynes, Kathryn
Joyner, Kara
Peters, H. Elizabeth
Deleone, Felicia Yang
The Transition to Early Fatherhood: National Estimates Based on Multiple Surveys
Demographic Research 18,12 (29 April 2008): 337-376.
Also: http://www.demographic-research.org/Volumes/Vol18/12/18-12.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Age at First Intercourse; Data Analysis; Family Background; Fatherhood; Fathers; Gender; Male Sample; National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG); Racial Studies

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study provides systematic information about the prevalence of early male fertility and the relationship between family background characteristics and early parenthood across three widely used data sources: the 1979 and 1997 National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth and the 2002 National Survey of Family Growth. We provide descriptive statistics on early fertility by age, sex, race, cohort, and data set. Because each data set includes birth cohorts with varying early fertility rates, prevalence estimates for early male fertility are relatively similar across data sets. Associations between background characteristics and early fertility in regression models are less consistent across data sets. We discuss the implications of these findings for scholars doing research on early male fertility. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

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Bibliography Citation
Hynes, Kathryn, Kara Joyner, H. Elizabeth Peters and Felicia Yang Deleone. "The Transition to Early Fatherhood: National Estimates Based on Multiple Surveys." Demographic Research 18,12 (29 April 2008): 337-376.
4. Joyner, Kara
Carmalt, Julie H.
Dunifon, Rachel
Parenting in Vain? Stepfather Influences on Early Transitions to Parenthood
Presented: Detroit MI, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2009.
Also: http://paa2009.princeton.edu/download.aspx?submissionId=91119
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Age at First Birth; Fathers, Biological; Fathers, Presence; Gender Differences; Parenting Skills/Styles

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1997, we examine the influence of resident fathers' parenting style on early transitions to parenthood. Results differ by gender and for those living with biological vs. stepfathers. We find, overall, fewer family-based predictors of early parenthood for boys, compared to girls, and for those living with a stepfather, compared to those living with a biological father. For girls, having an uninvolved mother or an authoritarian father is associated with an increased risk of early parenthood, but only for those living with a biological father. For boys, there were no effects of maternal parenting style on early parenthood. However, having an uninvolved biological father was associated with an increased risk in early fertility, while the opposite effect was observed for stepfathers, such that having an uninvolved stepfather was associated with a reduced risk of early birth.
Bibliography Citation
Joyner, Kara, Julie H. Carmalt and Rachel Dunifon. "Parenting in Vain? Stepfather Influences on Early Transitions to Parenthood." Presented: Detroit MI, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2009.
5. Joyner, Kara
Cawley, John
Sobal, Jeffery
Relationships Between Obesity, Romantic Involvement, and Sexual Behavior in Adolescents
Presented: Boston, MA, Population Association of America Meetings, April 2004.
Also: http://paa2004.princeton.edu/abstractViewer.asp?submissionId=40734
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Contraception; Dating; Fertility; Obesity; Pregnancy, Adolescent; Sexual Behavior

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The role of body weight in affecting a host of fertility-related behaviors, including dating, intercourse, contraceptive use, and pregnancy, has been little studied by demographers. This is surprising given the importance to adolescents of appearance in general and weight in particular. Because of the stigmatization of obesity, we hypothesized that heavier boys and girls are less likely to date and have sex than healthy-weight adolescents. We examined these relationships using two large, nationally representative data sets: the National Longitudinal Survey of Adolescent Health (Add Health) and the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1997 Cohort (NLSY97). Overall, our results confirm our prediction that heavier adolescents, especially girls, are less likely to become romantically involved, to date, and to have sex.
Bibliography Citation
Joyner, Kara, John Cawley and Jeffery Sobal. "Relationships Between Obesity, Romantic Involvement, and Sexual Behavior in Adolescents." Presented: Boston, MA, Population Association of America Meetings, April 2004.
6. Joyner, Kara
Peters, H. Elizabeth
Hynes, Kathryn
Sikora, Asia
Taber, Jamie Rubenstein
Rendall, Michael S.
The Quality of Male Fertility Data in Major U.S. Surveys
Demography 49,1 (February 2012): 101-124.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/n52u383172070883/
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Census of Population; Data Quality/Consistency; Fathers; Fathers, Biological; Fertility; Methods/Methodology; Monte Carlo; National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Researchers continue to question fathers’ willingness to report their biological children in surveys and the ability of surveys to adequately represent fathers. To address these concerns, this study evaluates the quality of men’s fertility data in the 1979 and 1997 cohorts of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79 and NLSY97) and in the 2002 National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG). Comparing fertility rates in each survey with population rates based on data from Vital Statistics and the U.S. Census Bureau, we document how the incomplete reporting of births in different surveys varies according to men’s characteristics, including their age, race, marital status, and birth cohort. In addition, we use Monte Carlo simulations based on the NSFG data to demonstrate how birth underreporting biases associations between early parenthood and its antecedents. We find that in the NSFG, roughly four out of five early births were reported; but in the NLSY79 and NLSY97, almost nine-tenths of early births were reported. In all three surveys, incomplete reporting was especially pronounced for nonmarital births. Our results suggest that the quality of male fertility data is strongly linked to survey design and that it has implications for models of early male fertility.
Bibliography Citation
Joyner, Kara, H. Elizabeth Peters, Kathryn Hynes, Asia Sikora, Jamie Rubenstein Taber and Michael S. Rendall. "The Quality of Male Fertility Data in Major U.S. Surveys ." Demography 49,1 (February 2012): 101-124.
7. Joyner, Kara
Peters, H. Elizabeth
Sikora, Asia
Hynes, Kathryn
Rubenstein, Jamie C.
The Quality of Male Fertility Data in Major U.S. Surveys
Presented: Dallas, TX, Population Association of America Meetings, April 2010
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Age and Ageing; Age at Birth; Census of Population; Data Quality/Consistency; Ethnic Differences; Fatherhood; Fathers; Fathers and Children; Fertility; Marital Status; Methods/Methodology; Monte Carlo; National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG); Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Researchers continue to question fathers' willingness to report their biological children in surveys, and the ability of surveys to adequately represent them. To address these concerns, this study evaluates the quality of men's fertility data in the 1979 and 1997 Cohorts of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79 and NLSY97), and in the 2002 National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG). Comparing fertility rates in each survey to population rates based on the data from the National Center for Health Statistics and the U.S. Census Bureau, we document how the undercount of births to men in different surveys varies according to several of their characteristics, including their age, race/ethnicity, marital status, and birth cohort. In addition, we use Monte Carlo simulations based on the NSFG data to demonstrate how birth undercounting biases associations between early parenthood and its antecedents.
Bibliography Citation
Joyner, Kara, H. Elizabeth Peters, Asia Sikora, Kathryn Hynes and Jamie C. Rubenstein. "The Quality of Male Fertility Data in Major U.S. Surveys." Presented: Dallas, TX, Population Association of America Meetings, April 2010.
8. Manning, Wendy D.
Joyner, Kara
Hemez, Paul
Cupka, Cassandra Jean
Measuring Cohabitation in National Surveys
Presented: Chicago IL, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2017
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Cohabitation; Current Population Survey (CPS) / CPS-Fertility Supplement; Data Quality/Consistency; National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (AddHealth); National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Cohabitation is one of the fastest growing family forms in the United States, but has not been consistently measured across surveys. Recent rounds of the Current Population Survey (CPS), National Longitudinal Survey of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health), National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY-97) and National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG) are used to assess the quality of data on cohabitation. Results demonstrated that the surveys provide similar estimates of current cohabitation status, except the CPS resulted in lower estimates. In terms of cohabitation experience (i.e., having ever cohabited), Add Health produced higher estimates, whereas both the NSFG and NLSY-97 produced lower estimates. We documented a strong education gradient across all surveys, with lower levels of current cohabitation and cohabitating experience with increases in educational attainment. Race/ethnic differentials in cohabitation were inconsistent across surveys. We discussed aspects of sampling and measurement that potentially explain differences in estimates.
Bibliography Citation
Manning, Wendy D., Kara Joyner, Paul Hemez and Cassandra Jean Cupka. "Measuring Cohabitation in National Surveys." Presented: Chicago IL, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2017.
9. Manning, Wendy D.
Joyner, Kara
Hemez, Paul
Cupka, Cassandra Jean
Measuring Cohabitation in U.S. National Surveys
Demography 56,4 (August 2019): 1195-1218.
Also: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s13524-019-00796-0
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Cohabitation; Current Population Survey (CPS) / CPS-Fertility Supplement; Educational Attainment; National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (AddHealth); National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG); Research Methodology

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Cohabitation is one of the fastest growing family forms in the United States. It is widespread and continues to increase but has not been consistently measured across surveys. It is important to track the quality of data on cohabitation because it has implications for research on the correlates and consequences of cohabitation for adults and children. Recent rounds of the Current Population Survey (CPS), National Longitudinal Survey of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health), National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY-97), and National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG) provide an opportunity to contrast estimates of cohabitation status and experience using nationally representative data sets and assess the quality of data on cohabitation in these data sets. Results demonstrated that the surveys provide similar estimates of current cohabitation status, except the CPS resulted in lower estimates. In terms of cohabitation experience (i.e., having ever cohabited), Add Health produced higher estimates, whereas both the NSFG and NLSY-97 produced lower estimates. We documented a strong education gradient across all surveys, with lower levels of current cohabitation and cohabitating experience and with increases in educational attainment. Racial/ethnic differences in cohabitation were inconsistent across surveys. We discuss aspects of sampling and measurement that potentially explain differences in estimates. Our findings have implications not only for survey design but also for the interpretation of results based on these four national surveys.
Bibliography Citation
Manning, Wendy D., Kara Joyner, Paul Hemez and Cassandra Jean Cupka. "Measuring Cohabitation in U.S. National Surveys." Demography 56,4 (August 2019): 1195-1218.