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Source: Review of Economics of the Household
Resulting in 19 citations.
1. Ahituv, Avner
Lerman, Robert I.
Job Turnover, Wage Rates, and Marital Stability: How Are They Related?
Review of Economics of the Household 9,2 (June 2011): 221-249.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/r5x6v43k45102h8q/
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Employment; Job Turnover; Marital Stability; Marriage; Wage Rates

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study examines the interplay between job stability, wage rates, and marital stability. We use a Dynamic Selection Control model in which young men make sequential choices about work and family and estimate the model using an approach that takes account of self-selection, simultaneity and unobserved heterogeneity. The results quantify how job stability affects wage rates, how both affect marital status, and how marital status affects earnings and job stability. The study reveals robust evidence that job changes lower wages and the likelihood of getting married and remaining married. At the same time, marriage raises wage rates and job stability. To project the sequential effects linking job change, marital status, and earnings, we simulate the impacts of shocks that raise preferences for marriage and that increase education. Feedback effects cause the simulated wage gains from marriage to cumulate over time, indicating that long-run marriage wage premiums exceed conventional short-run estimates.
Bibliography Citation
Ahituv, Avner and Robert I. Lerman. "Job Turnover, Wage Rates, and Marital Stability: How Are They Related? ." Review of Economics of the Household 9,2 (June 2011): 221-249.
2. Akashi-Ronquest, Naoko
The Impact of Biological Preferences on Parental Investments in Children and Step-Children
Review of Economics of the Household 7,1 (March 2009): 59–81.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/n2w12174x6x24170/
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Bargaining Model; Divorce; Family Structure; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Marital Status; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Parental Marital Status; Remarriage

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

A remarriage typically involves significant changes in a family's financial circumstance, and these changes, combined with the relative bargaining relationship between spouses, likely affect the well-being of the children who are part of the family. In this paper, I use the separate-spheres model, a theoretical model that explains the determinants of bargaining power in marriage, to analyze how a remarried couple's bargaining relationship affects their child investment in stepfamilies. Based on this theoretical model, I build and estimate an empirical model that investigates the determinants of parental investment. As evidence of parental preference for biological children over stepchildren, I find that an increased wage rate of a biological mother significantly improves her child investment when her husband is a stepfather of the child, while there is no such effect for mothers living with the biological father of the child.
Bibliography Citation
Akashi-Ronquest, Naoko. "The Impact of Biological Preferences on Parental Investments in Children and Step-Children." Review of Economics of the Household 7,1 (March 2009): 59–81. A.
3. Amuedo-Dorantes, Catalina
Kimmel, Jean
The Motherhood Wage Gap for Women in the United States: The Importance of College and Fertility Delay
Review of Economics of the Household 3,1 (March 2005): 17-48.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/u371kgl72303k370/
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Childbearing; College Graduates; Fertility; First Birth; Heterogeneity; Mothers, Income; Wage Gap

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

One of the stylized facts from the past 30 years has been the declining rate of first births before age 30 for all women and the increase rate of first births after age 30 among women with four-year college degrees (Steven P. Martin, Demography, 37(4), 523–533, 2000). What are some of the factors behind womens decision to postpone their childbearing? We hypothesize that the wage difference often observed between like-educated mothers and non-mothers (Jane Waldfogel, Journal of Labor Economics, 16, 505–545, 1998a; Journal of Economic Perspectives 12(1) 137–156, 1998b) may be affected by the postponement of childbearing until after careers are fully established. Hence, we focus on college-educated women because they are typically more career-oriented than their non-college educated counterparts and also the group most often observed postponing maternity. We use individual-level data on women from the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79) in order to control for individual-level unobserved heterogeneity as well as human capital characteristics, such as actual work experience, in our empirical analysis. We estimate wage equations, first producing base-line results to compare to the existing literature. Then, we expand the basic wage equation model to address fundamental econometric issues and the education/fertility issue at hand. Our empirical findings are two-fold. First, we find that college-educated mothers do not experience a motherhood wage penalty at all. In fact, they enjoy a wage boost when compared to college-educated childless women. Second, fertility delay enhances this wage boost even further. Our results provide an explanation for the observed postponement of maternity for educated women. We argue that the wage boost experienced by college-educated mothers may be the result of their search for family–friendly work environments, which, in turn, yields job matches with more female-friendly firms offering greater opportunities for advancement.
Bibliography Citation
Amuedo-Dorantes, Catalina and Jean Kimmel. "The Motherhood Wage Gap for Women in the United States: The Importance of College and Fertility Delay." Review of Economics of the Household 3,1 (March 2005): 17-48.
4. Baughman, Reagan A.
The Impact of Child Support on Child Health
Review of Economics of the Household 15,1 (March 2017): 69-91.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11150-014-9268-3
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Aid for Families with Dependent Children (AFDC); Body Mass Index (BMI); Child Health; Child Support; Children, Illness; Fathers, Presence; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Insurance, Health; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Weight

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The broad goals of child support policy are to keep children in single-parent families out of poverty and to make sure that their material needs are met. One potentially important, but relatively understudied, set of measures of child well-being are health outcomes. A fixed-effects analysis of data from the Child and Young Adult file of the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth shows that, conditional upon receipt of some amount of child support, higher payment levels are associated with significantly greater odds of having private health insurance coverage and significantly lower odds of poor or declining health status. These effects persist even after controlling for other factors that are likely to be correlated with child support payments, including total family income and paternal visitation patterns.
Bibliography Citation
Baughman, Reagan A. "The Impact of Child Support on Child Health." Review of Economics of the Household 15,1 (March 2017): 69-91.
5. Baum, Charles L., II
Chou, Shin-Yi
Why Has the Prevalence of Obesity Doubled?
Review of Economics of the Household 14,2 (June 2016): 251-267.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11150-015-9298-5
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Body Mass Index (BMI); Cigarette Use (see Smoking); Food Stamps (see Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program); Obesity; Urbanization/Urban Living; Weight

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The prevalence of obesity has doubled over the last 25 years. We estimate the effects of multiple socio-environmental factors (e.g., physical demands at work, restaurants, food prices, cigarette smoking, food stamps, and urban sprawl) on obesity using NLSY data. Then we use the Oaxaca–Blinder decomposition technique to approximate the contribution of each socio-environmental factor to the increase during this time. Many socio-environmental factors significantly affect weight, but none are able to explain a large portion of the obesity increase. Decreases in cigarette smoking consistently explains about 2–4 % of the increase in obesity and BMI. Food stamp receipt also consistently affects the measures of weight, but the small decrease in food stamp program participation during the period we examine actually dampened the increases in obesity and BMI. Collectively, the socio-environmental factors we examine never explain more than about 6.5 % of the weight increases.
Bibliography Citation
Baum, Charles L., II and Shin-Yi Chou. "Why Has the Prevalence of Obesity Doubled?" Review of Economics of the Household 14,2 (June 2016): 251-267.
6. Berger, Lawrence Marc
Waldfogel, Jane
Out-of-Home Placement of Children and Economic Factors: An Empirical Analysis
Review of Economics of the Household 2,4 (December 2004): 387-411.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/r0267143242p8411/
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Childhood Residence; Cohabitation; Event History; Family Structure; Foster Care; Household Composition; Maternal Employment; Parents, Single; Residence; Welfare

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

In this paper, we use data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) to estimate the effects of income, maternal employment, family structure, and public policies on several measures of children's living arrangements. We use both linear probability models and discrete-time event history models to explore the effects of these factors on: (1) the probability that a child is living out-of-home in a given year; (2) the probability that a child is removed from home in a given year, conditional on the child living at home in the previous year; (3) the probability that a child is removed from home for the first time; (4) the probability that a child is reunified with his/her biological parent(s) given that the child was living out-of-home in the previous year. We also analyze whether these estimates differ by types of out-of-home placements. Our results suggest that children from lower-income, single-mother, and mother-partner families are considerably more likely both to be living out-of-home and to be removed from home. A change in family structure also tends to place a child at higher risk of an out-of-home living arrangement, unless this transition functions to bring a child's father back into the household. Maternal work appears to increase the probability that a child lives at home. Additionally, once a removal has taken place, we do not find a relationship between income and the probability of a family reunification, but we do find that single-mother and mother-partner families are less likely to reunify. Finally, our analyses provide some evidence that welfare benefit levels are negatively related to out-of-home placements. [PUBLICATION ABSTRACT]
...We use data from the Geographic Micro-Data and Child and Young Adult files of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY). We begin with all children who were observed at any point from 1984 through 2000.
Bibliography Citation
Berger, Lawrence Marc and Jane Waldfogel. "Out-of-Home Placement of Children and Economic Factors: An Empirical Analysis." Review of Economics of the Household 2,4 (December 2004): 387-411.
7. Blau, David M.
van der Klaauw, Wilbert
A Demographic Analysis of the Family Structure Experiences of Children in the United States
Review of Economics of the Household, 6,3 (September 2008): 193-221.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/j7l03486613rp142/
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Child Support; Childhood Residence; Cohabitation; Divorce; Family Structure; Fathers, Presence; Household Composition; Marital Status; Marriage; Residence; Wage Rates

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper analyzes the family structure experiences of children in the U.S. Childbearing and transitions among single, cohabiting, and married states are analyzed jointly. A novel contribution is to distinguish men by their relationship to children: biological father or stepfather. The analysis uses data from the NLSY79. A key finding is that children of black mothers spend on average only 33% of their childhood living with the biological father and mother, compared to 74% for children of white mothers. The two most important proximate demographic determinants of the large racial gap are the much higher propensity of black women to conceive children outside of a union, and the lower rate of "shotgun" unions for blacks compared to whites. Another notable finding is that cohabitation plays a negligible role in the family structure experiences of children of white mothers, and even for children of black mothers accounts for less than one fifth of time spent living with both biological parents.
Bibliography Citation
Blau, David M. and Wilbert van der Klaauw. "A Demographic Analysis of the Family Structure Experiences of Children in the United States." Review of Economics of the Household, 6,3 (September 2008): 193-221.
8. Chatterji, Pinka
Frick, Kevin D.
Does Returning to Work After Childbirth Affect Breastfeeding Practices?
Review of Economics of the Household, 3, 3 (September 2005): 315-335.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/k713823u340146np/
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Breastfeeding; Maternal Employment; Modeling, Probit; Siblings; Work History

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study examines the effect of the timing and intensity of returning to work after childbirth on the probability of initiating breastfeeding and the number of weeks of breastfeeding. Data come from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79). Baseline probit models and family-level fixed effects models indicate that returning to work within 3 months is associated with a reduction in the probability that the mother will initiate breastfeeding by 1618%. Among those mothers who initiate breastfeeding, returning to work within 3 months is associated with a reduction in the length of breastfeeding of 45 weeks. We find less consistent evidence that working at least 35 h per week (among mothers who return to work within 3 months) detracts from breastfeeding. Future research is needed on understanding how employers can design policies and workplaces that support breastfeeding.
Bibliography Citation
Chatterji, Pinka and Kevin D. Frick. "Does Returning to Work After Childbirth Affect Breastfeeding Practices? ." Review of Economics of the Household, 3, 3 (September 2005): 315-335.
9. Cintina, Inna
The Effect of Minimum Drinking Age Laws on Pregnancy, Fertility, and Alcohol Consumption
Review of Economics of the Household 13,4 (December 2015): 1003-1022.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11150-014-9271-8/fulltext.html
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Adolescent Sexual Activity; Alcohol Use; Fertility; Geocoded Data; Pregnancy, Adolescent; State-Level Data/Policy

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Analysis of micro-level data reveals that changes in the minimum legal drinking age (MLDA) could induce changes in the intensity and location of alcohol consumption, sexual behavior, and teen fertility. Effects on teen fertility vary across different populations. Among 15–20 year-old non-poor whites, less restrictive legal access to alcohol decreases the probability of first pregnancy and abortion. For this group, easier legal access to alcohol likely increases the alcohol consumption in bars. For black and poor white young women, the results are sensitive to the alcohol consumption restrictions measure. A decrease in the MLDA increases the probability of first pregnancy and abortion. Yet, using a more precise measure that accounts for the MLDA and the woman’s age, these results generally no longer hold.
Bibliography Citation
Cintina, Inna. "The Effect of Minimum Drinking Age Laws on Pregnancy, Fertility, and Alcohol Consumption." Review of Economics of the Household 13,4 (December 2015): 1003-1022.
10. Grossbard, Shoshana
Mukhopadhyay, Sankar
Children, Spousal Love, and Happiness: An Economic Analysis
Review of Economics of the Household 11,3 (September 2013): 447-467.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11150-013-9200-2
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Children; Happiness (see Positive Affect/Optimism); Marital Satisfaction/Quality; Marriage

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

In this paper we examine how children affect happiness and relationships within a family by analyzing two unique questions in the National Longitudinal Study of Youth’s 1997 cohort. We find that (a) presence of children is associated with a loss of spousal love; (b) loss of spousal love is associated with loss of overall happiness; but (c) presence of children is not associated with significant loss of overall happiness. If children reduce feelings of being loved by the spouse but do not reduce reported happiness even though spousal love induces happiness, then it must be the case that children contribute to parental happiness by providing other benefits. After ruling out some competing compensation mechanisms we infer that loss of spousal love is compensated with altruistic feelings towards children.
Bibliography Citation
Grossbard, Shoshana and Sankar Mukhopadhyay. "Children, Spousal Love, and Happiness: An Economic Analysis." Review of Economics of the Household 11,3 (September 2013): 447-467.
11. Grossman, Michael
Kaestner, Robert
Markowitz, Sara
Get High and Get Stupid: The Effect of Alcohol and Marijuana Use on Teen Sexual Behavior
Review of Economics of the Household 2, 4 (2004): 413-441.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/h3841721727h2tp5/fulltext.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Drug Use; Risk-Taking; Sexual Behavior; Substance Use; Teenagers

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Numerous studies have documented a strong correlation between substance use and teen sexual behavior, and this empirical relationship has given rise to a widespread belief that substance use causes teens to engage in risky sex. This causal link is often used by advocates to justify policies targeted at reducing substance use. Here, we argue that previous research has not produced sufficient evidence to substantiate a causal relationship between substance use and teen sexual behavior. Accordingly, we attempt to estimate causal effects using two complementary research approaches. Our findings suggest that substance use is not causally related to teen sexual behavior, although we cannot definitively rule out that possibility.
Bibliography Citation
Grossman, Michael, Robert Kaestner and Sara Markowitz. "Get High and Get Stupid: The Effect of Alcohol and Marijuana Use on Teen Sexual Behavior." Review of Economics of the Household 2, 4 (2004): 413-441.
12. Lundberg, Shelly
Romich, Jennifer L.
Tsang, Kwok Ping
Decision-Making by Children
Review of Economics of the Household 7,1 (March 2009): 1-30.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/618610672t3ml3r5/
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Child Development; Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS); Children; Cognitive Ability; Ethnic Differences; Household Composition; Marital Disruption; Marriage; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Racial Differences; Risk-Taking; Self-Reporting

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

In this paper, we examine the determinants of decision-making power by children and young adolescents. Moving beyond previous economic models that treat children as goods consumed by adults, we develop a noncooperative model of parental control of child behavior and child resistance. Using child reports of decision-making and psychological and cognitive measures from the NLSY79 Child Supplement, we examine the determinants of shared and sole decision-making based on indices created from seven domains of child activity. We find that the determinants of sole decision-making by the child and shared decision-making with parents are quite distinct: sharing decisions appears to be a form of parental investment in child development rather than a simple stage in the transfer of authority. In addition, we find that indicators of child capabilities and preferences affect reports of decision-making authority in ways that suggest child demand for autonomy as well as parental discretion in determining these outcomes.
Bibliography Citation
Lundberg, Shelly, Jennifer L. Romich and Kwok Ping Tsang. "Decision-Making by Children." Review of Economics of the Household 7,1 (March 2009): 1-30.
13. Malcolm, Michael
Kaya, Ilker
Selection Works Both Ways: BMI and Marital Formation Among Young Women
Review of Economics of the Household 14,2 (June 2016): 293-311.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11150-014-9247-8
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Age at First Marriage; Body Mass Index (BMI); Marital Status; Weight

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The literature on entry into marriages has almost universally regarded a high body mass index (BMI) to be a disadvantage for women in the marriage market. But the theoretical effect of BMI on marital entry is actually uncertain because women who anticipate poor outcomes in the marriage market are more likely to accept early offers, while women with more desirable characteristics can afford to wait for a better match. Using data from the 1997 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, we show that female entry into marriage does decline as BMI rises, but that early marriage is nonlinear in BMI. Women with an extremely high BMI or with a BMI in the most attractive range are less likely to marry early.
Bibliography Citation
Malcolm, Michael and Ilker Kaya. "Selection Works Both Ways: BMI and Marital Formation Among Young Women." Review of Economics of the Household 14,2 (June 2016): 293-311.
14. Mukhopadhyay, Sankar
Do Women Value Marriage More? The Effect of Obesity on Cohabitation and Marriage in the USA
Review of Economics of the Household 6,2 (June 2008): 111-126.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/2lxn5846t7540331/
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Cohabitation; Gender Differences; Income; Marriage; Obesity

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper looks into the impact of obesity and other factors on first entry into a marital or cohabiting union, using 1997 cohort data from the national longitudinal survey. Results show obese women are less likely to be accepted into either cohabitation or marriage, while obese men are less likely to be accepted in a cohabitating relation but are not less likely to enter into marriage. Income affects all union and all genders symmetrically, increasing the likelihood of a union. These results suggest that marriage is a special form of union for women, so they are willing to marry obese men because they value other factors related to the marriage choice, such as commitment or the prospect of having children. Men do not appear to value these factors as much, so obese women are less likely to be accepted into either cohabitation or marriage. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

Copyright of Review of Economics of the Household is the property of Springer Science & Business Media B.V. and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts)

Bibliography Citation
Mukhopadhyay, Sankar. "Do Women Value Marriage More? The Effect of Obesity on Cohabitation and Marriage in the USA." Review of Economics of the Household 6,2 (June 2008): 111-126.
15. Pylypchuk, Yuriy
Kirby, James B.
The Role of Marriage in Explaining Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Access to Health Care for Men in the US
Review of Economics of the Household 15,3 (September 2017): 807-832.
Also: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11150-015-9300-2
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Ethnic Differences; Health Care; Marriage; Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Reducing disparities in access to health care is a long-standing objective of the federal government. Building on research showing that marriage can provide important resources for obtaining needed health care, we suggest that racial and ethnic differences in marriage could explain persistent disparities in access. Using data from MEPS and NLSY we investigate the association between marriage and access to health care among men, and estimate the extent to which racial and ethnic differences in both the returns to marriage and marital rates explain differences in access and preventive service use. We find that marriage accounts for up to 24% of racial and ethnic differences in access and preventive use. The returns to marriage for whites and blacks, however, are greater than that for Hispanics. We suggest that differences in spousal characteristics such as education and income could explain why whites and blacks benefit from marriage more than Hispanics. We find support for this hypothesis: differences in spousal characteristics account for up to 37% of the gap in access and preventive use among married adults.
Bibliography Citation
Pylypchuk, Yuriy and James B. Kirby. "The Role of Marriage in Explaining Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Access to Health Care for Men in the US ." Review of Economics of the Household 15,3 (September 2017): 807-832.
16. Rahim, Fazeer
Work-Family Attitudes and Career Interruptions Due to Childbirth
Review of Economics of the Household 12,1 (March 2014): 177-205.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11150-013-9180-2/fulltext.html
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Attitudes; Career Patterns; Childbearing; Gender Attitudes/Roles; Maternal Employment

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper examines the impact of attitudes on gender roles, work and the family on the duration of career-interruptions due to childbirth. Using latent class analysis, three different classes of mothers are identified based on their attitudes: home-oriented, adaptive and career-oriented mothers. Controlling for observable individual and family characteristics as well as the institutional and economic environment, it is shown that home-oriented mothers have more children and take longer leaves for each child than adaptive mothers, who themselves take longer leaves than career-oriented mothers. The difference is more marked among mothers who have been working the last quarter before giving birth: while 80% of the career-oriented mothers return to work after 6 months, only 70% of home-oriented mothers do so. Pre-motherhood and pre-labor-market attitudes of mothers are used in the determination of classes to avoid reverse causation of motherhood and work experiences on attitudes. These results cast doubts on the effectiveness of one-size-fits-all-policies and make the case for flexible policies that allow for different combinations of wages and maternity-leaves.
Bibliography Citation
Rahim, Fazeer. "Work-Family Attitudes and Career Interruptions Due to Childbirth." Review of Economics of the Household 12,1 (March 2014): 177-205.
17. Routon, P. Wesley
Military Service and Marital Dissolution: A Trajectory Analysis
Review of Economics of the Household 15,1 (March 2017): 335-355.
Also: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11150-016-9323-3
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Divorce; Marital Dissolution; Military Service; Veterans

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Military service adds additional challenges for married couples. Previous literature on service and marital stability is comprised of mixed results and has often ignored the timing of these effects. This timing is important as it helps disclose the nature of causality and has implications for both military and social security policies. Using a trajectory specification, I estimate the effect of military service on the likelihood of divorce during the volunteer's period of service and the years following. Two veteran cohorts are examined, those who served during the early twenty-first century wars and those who served during the early 1980s. Among my results, the former cohort is shown to have had their divorce probability increased in the first 2 years post-service, while the opposite effect is found for the latter cohort. Unlike many previous studies of military service and marital stability, I find that effects are not overly dissimilar across racial groups.
Bibliography Citation
Routon, P. Wesley. "Military Service and Marital Dissolution: A Trajectory Analysis." Review of Economics of the Household 15,1 (March 2017): 335-355.
18. Sabia, Joseph J.
Price, Joseph P.
Peters, H. Elizabeth
Covington, Reginald
The Effect on Teenage Childbearing on Social Capital Development: New Evidence on Civic Engagement
Review of Economics of the Household 16,3 (September 2018): 629-659.
Also: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11150-017-9371-3
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Civic Engagement; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Mothers, Adolescent; Parenthood; Political Attitudes/Behaviors/Efficacy; Social Capital; Volunteer Work; Voting Behavior

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 (NLSY97), we examine the relationship between teenage childbearing and four measures of adult civic engagement: charitable giving, volunteerism, political awareness, and voting. After accounting for selection on observables via propensity score matching and selection on unobservables via family fixed effects and instrumental variables approaches, we find that teen motherhood is negatively related to adult civic engagement. Descriptive evidence suggests that teen birth-induced reductions in educational attainment and the time-intensive nature of childcare are important mechanisms. Finally, we find that while the adverse civic engagement effects of teen parenthood may extend to teen fathers, the effects are much smaller in magnitude.
Bibliography Citation
Sabia, Joseph J., Joseph P. Price, H. Elizabeth Peters and Reginald Covington. "The Effect on Teenage Childbearing on Social Capital Development: New Evidence on Civic Engagement." Review of Economics of the Household 16,3 (September 2018): 629-659.
19. Zimmerman, Frederick J.
Agreeing on More than Chicken Soup: Intra-household Decision-Making and Treatment for Child Psychopathology
Review of Economics of the Household 4,3 (September 2006): 229-252.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/c352jgk213444766/
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Children, Health Care; Children, Mental Health; Divorce; Domestic Violence; Family Decision-making/Conflict; Health, Mental; Household Models; Marital Conflict; Marital Satisfaction/Quality; Sex Ratios; State-Level Data/Policy

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using a large, U.S. dataset it is shown that children are more likely to receive needed mental health specialty treatment when women have greater decision-making power, as measured by an index of wife-favorable divorce laws and by the sex ratio at the time of marriage. Stratified analyses show that this effect is modified by the degree of marital conflict. Marriages characterized by high conflict conform more closely to the unified household model. The paper then presents a model of household decision-making consistent with these results that incorporates both objective determinants of bargaining power as well as the role of violent coercion in maintaining otherwise unsustainable equilibria. Implications for improving children's access to mental health treatment are offered. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2006
Bibliography Citation
Zimmerman, Frederick J. "Agreeing on More than Chicken Soup: Intra-household Decision-Making and Treatment for Child Psychopathology." Review of Economics of the Household 4,3 (September 2006): 229-252.