Search Results

Author: Sabia, Joseph J.
Resulting in 8 citations.
1. Covington, Reginald
Monson, William
Peters, H. Elizabeth
Price, Joseph P.
Sabia, Joseph J.
The Consequences of Teen Fatherhood: A Cohort Comparison of the NLSY79 and NLSY97
Presented: Bethesda MD, National Center for Family and Marriage Research's Fathers and Fathering in Contemporary Contexts Research Conference, May 2012
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: National Center for Family and Marriage Research
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Civic Engagement; Educational Attainment; Fatherhood; Parenthood

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Research Questions:

What are the consequences of having a teen birth on a variety of educational and economic outcomes and on civic engagement?
What are the differences in effects for teen mothers compared to teen fathers?
How have the consequences of teen parenthood changed across cohorts?
How stable are the results across different methods used to account for selection into teen parenthood

Conclusions:

Having a teen birth has negative consequences for a variety of outcomes
Some Consequences are similar for man and Women: Education; Civic engagement measures (except charitable giving)
Other consequences affect women primarily: Charitable giving; Poverty; Food stamp receipt
Many results are robust across multiple methods to account for selection: Education; Charitable giving (for women)
Other results become insignificant when using methods that account for unobservables: Civic engagement measures (except charitable giving); Food stamp receipt; Poverty

Bibliography Citation
Covington, Reginald, William Monson, H. Elizabeth Peters, Joseph P. Price and Joseph J. Sabia. "The Consequences of Teen Fatherhood: A Cohort Comparison of the NLSY79 and NLSY97." Presented: Bethesda MD, National Center for Family and Marriage Research's Fathers and Fathering in Contemporary Contexts Research Conference, May 2012.
2. Covington, Reginald
Peters, H. Elizabeth
Price, Joseph P.
Sabia, Joseph J.
Teen Fatherhood and Educational Attainment: A Cohort Comparison of the NLSY79 and NLSY97
Presented: European Conference On Health Economics (ECHE), July 2012
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: Swiss Association for Health Economics
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Civic Engagement; College Education; Educational Attainment; Fatherhood; High School Completion/Graduates; Parenthood; Propensity Scores; Volunteer Work; Voting Behavior

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using data from two cohorts of youths from the National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth 1979 and 1997 we estimate the effect of teen parenthood on educational attainment. Across a number of econometric strategies designed to control for measured and unmeasured heterogeneity—including propensity score matching, family fixed effects and instrumental variables—we find that teen fatherhood is associated with a lower probability of high school graduation and college attendance. While the magnitudes of the adverse schooling effects are larger for teen mothers than for teen fathers in the NLSY79 cohort, the costs of fatherhood increased in the NLSY97 cohort, narrowing the gap between men and women.
Bibliography Citation
Covington, Reginald, H. Elizabeth Peters, Joseph P. Price and Joseph J. Sabia. "Teen Fatherhood and Educational Attainment: A Cohort Comparison of the NLSY79 and NLSY97." Presented: European Conference On Health Economics (ECHE), July 2012.
3. Covington, Reginald
Peters, H. Elizabeth
Sabia, Joseph J.
Price, Joseph P.
Teen Fatherhood and Educational Attainment: Evidence from Three Cohorts of Youth
Working Paper, Cornell University, October 2011.
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: Department of Economics, Cornell University
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Childbearing, Adolescent; College Enrollment; Educational Attainment; Fatherhood; Gender Differences; High School Completion/Graduates; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Modeling, Instrumental Variables; Pregnancy, Adolescent; Propensity Scores; Teenagers

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

While a large number of studies have explored the schooling effects of teen motherhood, very few have examined the consequences of teen fatherhood. Using data drawn from two cohorts of youth from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 and 1997 (NLSY79 and NLSY97), we examine the relationship between teen parenthood and educational attainment, with careful attention to the role of family- and individual-level unmeasured heterogeneity. We find that teen mothers had a larger schooling penalty than teen fathers in the earlier cohort, but this difference appears to have diminished over time, with men in the NLSY97 cohort having a larger educational penalty than those from the NLSY79 cohort.
Bibliography Citation
Covington, Reginald, H. Elizabeth Peters, Joseph J. Sabia and Joseph P. Price. "Teen Fatherhood and Educational Attainment: Evidence from Three Cohorts of Youth." Working Paper, Cornell University, October 2011.
4. Fone, Zachary S.
Sabia, Joseph J.
Cesur, Resul
Do Minimum Wage Increases Reduce Crime?
NBER Working Paper No. 25647, National Bureau of Economic Research, March 2019.
Also: https://www.nber.org/papers/w25647
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)
Keyword(s): Arrests; Crime; Minimum Wage

An April 2016 Council of Economic Advisers (CEA) report advocated raising the minimum wage to deter crime. This recommendation rests on the assumption that minimum wage hikes increase the returns to legitimate labor market work while generating minimal adverse employment effects. This study comprehensively assesses the impact of minimum wages on crime using data from the 1998-2016 Uniform Crime Reports (UCR), National Incident-Based Reporting System (NIBRS), and National Longitudinal Study of Youth (NLSY). Our results provide no evidence that minimum wage increases reduce crime. Instead, we find that raising the minimum wage increases property crime arrests among those ages 16-to-24, with an estimated elasticity of 0.2. This result is strongest in counties with over 100,000 residents and persists when we use longitudinal data to isolate workers for whom minimum wages bind. Our estimates suggest that a $15 Federal minimum wage could generate criminal externality costs of nearly $2.4 billion.
Bibliography Citation
Fone, Zachary S., Joseph J. Sabia and Resul Cesur. "Do Minimum Wage Increases Reduce Crime?" NBER Working Paper No. 25647, National Bureau of Economic Research, March 2019.
5. Peters, H. Elizabeth
Sabia, Joseph J.
Price, Joseph P.
Covington, Reginald
The Effects of Teen and Early Fatherhood on Educational Attainment and Labor Market Outcomes
Presented: Washington, DC, Population Association of America Annual Meetings, March 31-April 2, 2011
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Childbearing, Adolescent; Educational Attainment; Fatherhood; Gender Differences; Labor Market Outcomes; National Education Longitudinal Survey (NELS); Pregnancy, Adolescent; Teenagers

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

A report from the National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy concluded that the public cost of teen births reached $9.1 billion in 2004. Much of the literature on the consequences of teen childbearing has focused on women, although the size of the effects varies widely depending on the techniques used to control for endogeneity. Despite the fact that men's role in fertility is receiving increasing attention, very little work estimates the consequences of early fatherhood. In this paper, we estimate the schooling and labor market consequences for men, using many of the same empirical techniques that have been used for women. We compare the consequences for men and women across three different data sets, the 1979 and 1997 cohorts of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth and the 1988 National Educational Longitudinal Survey, which enable us to analyze changes in the effect of teen parenthood over time.
Bibliography Citation
Peters, H. Elizabeth, Joseph J. Sabia, Joseph P. Price and Reginald Covington. "The Effects of Teen and Early Fatherhood on Educational Attainment and Labor Market Outcomes." Presented: Washington, DC, Population Association of America Annual Meetings, March 31-April 2, 2011.
6. Sabia, Joseph J.
Covinald, Reggie
Teen Parenthood and Adult Civic Engagement: New Evidence from the NLSY97
Presented: New Orleans LA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2013
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Civic Engagement; Income; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Mothers, Adolescent; Parenthood; Political Attitudes/Behaviors/Efficacy; Teenagers; Volunteer Work; Voting Behavior

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using data drawn from the National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth 1997 (NLSY97), we examine the relationship between teen parenthood and four measures of adult civic engagement: charitable giving, volunteerism, political awareness, and voting. Ordinary least squares (OLS) and propensity score matching (PSM) estimates suggest that teen parenthood is associated with lower levels of civic engagement. Family fixed effects estimates show estimated associations that are smaller in magnitude, but do not rule out adverse civic engagement effects. Finally, when we compare adult civic engagement of teen mothers to women who became pregnant, but miscarried as teens, we continue to find that teen motherhood is negatively related to charitable giving, volunteerism, and voting. Our findings suggest that diminished leisure time and adverse income effects of teen motherhood may have important adverse consequences for civic engagement.
Bibliography Citation
Sabia, Joseph J. and Reggie Covinald. "Teen Parenthood and Adult Civic Engagement: New Evidence from the NLSY97." Presented: New Orleans LA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2013.
7. Sabia, Joseph J.
Mackay, Taylor
Nguyen, Thanh Tam
Dave, Dhaval
Do Ban the Box Laws Increase Crime?
NBER Working Paper No. 24381, National Bureau of Economic Research, March 2018.
Also: http://www.nber.org/papers/w24381
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)
Keyword(s): Arrests; Crime; Criminal Justice System; Discrimination; Geocoded Data; State-Level Data/Policy

Ban-the-box (BTB) laws, which prevent employers from asking prospective employees about their criminal histories at initial job screenings, have been adopted by 25 states and the District of Columbia. Using data from the National Incident-Based Reporting System, the Uniform Crime Reports, and the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997, this study is the first to estimate the effect of BTB laws on crime. We find some evidence that BTB laws are associated with an increase in property crime among working-age Hispanic men. This finding is consistent with employer-based statistical discrimination as well as potential moral hazard. A causal interpretation of our results is supported by placebo tests on policy leads and a lack of BTB-induced increases in crime for non-Hispanic whites and women. Finally, we find that BTB laws are associated with a reduction in property crime among older and white individuals, consistent with labor-labor substitution toward those with perceived lower probabilities of having criminal records (Doleac and Hansen 2017). [Also presented at Austin TX, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2019]
Bibliography Citation
Sabia, Joseph J., Taylor Mackay, Thanh Tam Nguyen and Dhaval Dave. "Do Ban the Box Laws Increase Crime?" NBER Working Paper No. 24381, National Bureau of Economic Research, March 2018.
8. Sabia, Joseph J.
Price, Joseph P.
Peters, H. Elizabeth
Covington, Reginald
The Effect on Teenage Childbearing on Social Capital Development: New Evidence on Civic Engagement
Review of Economics of the Household 16,3 (September 2018): 629-659.
Also: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11150-017-9371-3
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Civic Engagement; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Mothers, Adolescent; Parenthood; Political Attitudes/Behaviors/Efficacy; Social Capital; Volunteer Work; Voting Behavior

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 (NLSY97), we examine the relationship between teenage childbearing and four measures of adult civic engagement: charitable giving, volunteerism, political awareness, and voting. After accounting for selection on observables via propensity score matching and selection on unobservables via family fixed effects and instrumental variables approaches, we find that teen motherhood is negatively related to adult civic engagement. Descriptive evidence suggests that teen birth-induced reductions in educational attainment and the time-intensive nature of childcare are important mechanisms. Finally, we find that while the adverse civic engagement effects of teen parenthood may extend to teen fathers, the effects are much smaller in magnitude.
Bibliography Citation
Sabia, Joseph J., Joseph P. Price, H. Elizabeth Peters and Reginald Covington. "The Effect on Teenage Childbearing on Social Capital Development: New Evidence on Civic Engagement." Review of Economics of the Household 16,3 (September 2018): 629-659.