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Author: Mukhopadhyay, Sankar
Resulting in 6 citations.
1. Grossbard, Shoshana
Mukhopadhyay, Sankar
Children, Spousal Love, and Happiness: An Economic Analysis
Review of Economics of the Household 11,3 (September 2013): 447-467.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11150-013-9200-2
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Children; Happiness (see Positive Affect/Optimism); Marital Satisfaction/Quality; Marriage

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

In this paper we examine how children affect happiness and relationships within a family by analyzing two unique questions in the National Longitudinal Study of Youth’s 1997 cohort. We find that (a) presence of children is associated with a loss of spousal love; (b) loss of spousal love is associated with loss of overall happiness; but (c) presence of children is not associated with significant loss of overall happiness. If children reduce feelings of being loved by the spouse but do not reduce reported happiness even though spousal love induces happiness, then it must be the case that children contribute to parental happiness by providing other benefits. After ruling out some competing compensation mechanisms we infer that loss of spousal love is compensated with altruistic feelings towards children.
Bibliography Citation
Grossbard, Shoshana and Sankar Mukhopadhyay. "Children, Spousal Love, and Happiness: An Economic Analysis." Review of Economics of the Household 11,3 (September 2013): 447-467.
2. Grossbard, Shoshana
Mukhopadhyay, Sankar
Marriage Markets as Explanation for Why Heavier People Work More Hours
IZA Journal of Labor Economics 6,9 (December 2017): DOI: 10.1186/s40172-017-0059-y.
Also: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1186/s40172-017-0059-y
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Body Mass Index (BMI); Marriage; Modeling, OLS; Siblings; Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Is BMI related to hours of work through marriage market mechanisms? We empirically explore this issue using data from the NLSY79 and NLSY97 and a number of estimation strategies (including OLS, IV, and sibling FE). Our IV estimates (with same-sex sibling's BMI as an instrument and a large set of controls including wage) suggest that a one-unit increase in BMI leads to an almost 2% increase in White married women's hours of work. However, BMI is not associated with hours of work of married men. We also find that a one-unit increase in BMI leads to a 1.4% increase in White single women's hours of work, suggesting that single women may expect future in-marriage transfers that vary by body weight. We show that the positive association between BMI and hours of work of White single women increases with self-assessed probability of future marriage and varies with expected cumulative spousal income. Comparisons between the association between BMI and hours of work for White and Black married women suggest a possible racial gap in intra-marriage transfers from husbands to wives.
Bibliography Citation
Grossbard, Shoshana and Sankar Mukhopadhyay. "Marriage Markets as Explanation for Why Heavier People Work More Hours." IZA Journal of Labor Economics 6,9 (December 2017): DOI: 10.1186/s40172-017-0059-y.
3. Mukhopadhyay, Sankar
Do Women Value Marriage More? The Effect of Obesity on Cohabitation and Marriage in the USA
Review of Economics of the Household 6,2 (June 2008): 111-126.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/2lxn5846t7540331/
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Cohabitation; Gender Differences; Income; Marriage; Obesity

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper looks into the impact of obesity and other factors on first entry into a marital or cohabiting union, using 1997 cohort data from the national longitudinal survey. Results show obese women are less likely to be accepted into either cohabitation or marriage, while obese men are less likely to be accepted in a cohabitating relation but are not less likely to enter into marriage. Income affects all union and all genders symmetrically, increasing the likelihood of a union. These results suggest that marriage is a special form of union for women, so they are willing to marry obese men because they value other factors related to the marriage choice, such as commitment or the prospect of having children. Men do not appear to value these factors as much, so obese women are less likely to be accepted into either cohabitation or marriage. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

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Bibliography Citation
Mukhopadhyay, Sankar. "Do Women Value Marriage More? The Effect of Obesity on Cohabitation and Marriage in the USA." Review of Economics of the Household 6,2 (June 2008): 111-126.
4. Mukhopadhyay, Sankar
The Effects of the 1978 Pregnancy Discrimination Act on Female Labor Supply
International Economic Review 53,4 (November 2012): 1133-1153.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1468-2354.2012.00714.x/abstract
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Discrimination, Sex; Labor Force Participation; Leave, Family or Maternity/Paternity; Marriage; Maternal Employment; Pregnancy and Pregnancy Outcomes

This article analyzes the effects of the 1978 Pregnancy Discrimination Act (PDA) on the labor force participation rates of married women by estimating a dynamic model of labor force participation. Results show that the PDA increased the labor force participation rate of pregnant women by 8.2 percentage points, of women with a child less than one year old by 3.4 percentage points, and of women with older children by 1.5 percentage points. Counterfactual policy simulations show that the provision of unpaid leave will increase the labor force participation rate of women with older children by an additional 3.7 percentage points.
Bibliography Citation
Mukhopadhyay, Sankar. "The Effects of the 1978 Pregnancy Discrimination Act on Female Labor Supply." International Economic Review 53,4 (November 2012): 1133-1153.
5. Mukhopadhyay, Sankar
Wendel, Jeanne
Is Post-Smoking-Cessation Weight-Gain a Significant Trigger for Relapse?
Applied Economics 43,24 (2011): 3449-3457.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00036841003652430
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Keyword(s): Body Mass Index (BMI); Ethnic Differences; Smoking (see Cigarette Use); Weight; Women

While the Surgeon General's Consumer Guide lists weight-gain as an important relapse trigger, the 2001 Surgeon General's Report on Women and Smoking concludes, paradoxically, that actual weight-gain during cessation does not appear to predict relapse. This dichotomous view reflects longstanding scientific uncertainty about the role of weight-gain in triggering relapse. This scientific uncertainty, which stems from mixed clinical trial results, is problematic for insurance coverage decisions such as state Medicaid programme decisions to cover or exclude smoking-cessation and weight-control pharmaceuticals. Analysts hypothesize that selection bias may explain the inconsistency between the negative clinical results and the persistent view that weight-gain triggers relapse, if weight-concern is both a key determinant of the transition from 'smoker' to 'ex-smoker,' and a key moderating variable in the relationship between weight-gain and relapse. We therefore use the nationally representative 1997 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY97) to test the relapse-trigger hypothesis, and conclude that post-smoking-cessation weight-gain triggers relapse among weight-concerned white women, but it is associated with quitting success among Hispanic women. In addition, our results do not support the hypothesis that the mixed clinical trial results reflect selection bias based on weight-concern.
Bibliography Citation
Mukhopadhyay, Sankar and Jeanne Wendel. "Is Post-Smoking-Cessation Weight-Gain a Significant Trigger for Relapse?" Applied Economics 43,24 (2011): 3449-3457.
6. Schiller, Bradley R.
Mukhopadhyay, Sankar
Long-Term Trends in Relative Earnings Mobility
Social Science Quarterly 94,4 (December 2013): 881-893.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/ssqu.12008/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Earnings; Mobility

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objectives: The extent of individual mobility across hierarchical ranks of the income distribution is a critical factor in interpreting the sociopolitical significance of well-documented increases in cross-sectional inequality. The objective of this study is to replicate two earlier investigations of mobility, allowing one to discern trends in mobility rates and patterns.

Methods: Mobility was measured using data from NLSY79 (where NLSY is National Longitudinal Survey of Youth) for the years 1989–2004.

Results: Results show that hierarchical (relative) mobility has remained substantial and pervasive from the 1970s through the 1990s for male workers, with no evidence of any attenuation. In view of the increased distance between (absolute) income ranks, this observation is both surprising and reassuring.

Conclusion: Despite substantial increase in cross-sectional inequality, long-term mobility rates have not changed since the 1960s.

Bibliography Citation
Schiller, Bradley R. and Sankar Mukhopadhyay. "Long-Term Trends in Relative Earnings Mobility." Social Science Quarterly 94,4 (December 2013): 881-893.