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Author: Grossbard, Shoshana
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Grossbard, Shoshana
Mukhopadhyay, Sankar
Children, Spousal Love, and Happiness: An Economic Analysis
Review of Economics of the Household 11,3 (September 2013): 447-467.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11150-013-9200-2
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Children; Happiness (see Positive Affect/Optimism); Marital Satisfaction/Quality; Marriage

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

In this paper we examine how children affect happiness and relationships within a family by analyzing two unique questions in the National Longitudinal Study of Youth’s 1997 cohort. We find that (a) presence of children is associated with a loss of spousal love; (b) loss of spousal love is associated with loss of overall happiness; but (c) presence of children is not associated with significant loss of overall happiness. If children reduce feelings of being loved by the spouse but do not reduce reported happiness even though spousal love induces happiness, then it must be the case that children contribute to parental happiness by providing other benefits. After ruling out some competing compensation mechanisms we infer that loss of spousal love is compensated with altruistic feelings towards children.
Bibliography Citation
Grossbard, Shoshana and Sankar Mukhopadhyay. "Children, Spousal Love, and Happiness: An Economic Analysis." Review of Economics of the Household 11,3 (September 2013): 447-467.
2. Grossbard, Shoshana
Mukhopadhyay, Sankar
Marriage Markets as Explanation for Why Heavier People Work More Hours
IZA Journal of Labor Economics 6,9 (December 2017): DOI: 10.1186/s40172-017-0059-y.
Also: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1186/s40172-017-0059-y
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Body Mass Index (BMI); Marriage; Modeling, OLS; Siblings; Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Is BMI related to hours of work through marriage market mechanisms? We empirically explore this issue using data from the NLSY79 and NLSY97 and a number of estimation strategies (including OLS, IV, and sibling FE). Our IV estimates (with same-sex sibling's BMI as an instrument and a large set of controls including wage) suggest that a one-unit increase in BMI leads to an almost 2% increase in White married women's hours of work. However, BMI is not associated with hours of work of married men. We also find that a one-unit increase in BMI leads to a 1.4% increase in White single women's hours of work, suggesting that single women may expect future in-marriage transfers that vary by body weight. We show that the positive association between BMI and hours of work of White single women increases with self-assessed probability of future marriage and varies with expected cumulative spousal income. Comparisons between the association between BMI and hours of work for White and Black married women suggest a possible racial gap in intra-marriage transfers from husbands to wives.
Bibliography Citation
Grossbard, Shoshana and Sankar Mukhopadhyay. "Marriage Markets as Explanation for Why Heavier People Work More Hours." IZA Journal of Labor Economics 6,9 (December 2017): DOI: 10.1186/s40172-017-0059-y.