Search Results

Author: Price, Joseph P.
Resulting in 17 citations.
1. Buckles, Kasey S.
Price, Joseph P.
Selection and the Marriage Premium for Infant Health
Demography 50,4 (August 2013): 1315-1339.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s13524-013-0211-7
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Birthweight; Infants; Marriage; Natality Detail Files; National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Previous research has found a positive relationship between marriage and infant health, but it is unclear whether this relationship is causal or a reflection of positive selection into marriage. We use multiple empirical approaches to address this issue. First, using a technique developed by Gelbach (2009) to determine the relative importance of observable characteristics, we show how selection into marriage has changed over time. Second, we construct a matched sample of children born to the same mother and apply panel data techniques to account for time-invariant unobserved characteristics. We find evidence of a sizable marriage premium. However, this premium fell by more than 40 % between 1989 and 2004, largely as a result of declining selection into marriage by race. Accounting for selection reduces ordinary least squares estimates of the marriage premiums for birth weight, prematurity, and infant mortality by at least one-half.
Bibliography Citation
Buckles, Kasey S. and Joseph P. Price. "Selection and the Marriage Premium for Infant Health." Demography 50,4 (August 2013): 1315-1339.
2. Covington, Reginald
Monson, William
Peters, H. Elizabeth
Price, Joseph P.
Sabia, Joseph J.
The Consequences of Teen Fatherhood: A Cohort Comparison of the NLSY79 and NLSY97
Presented: Bethesda MD, National Center for Family and Marriage Research's Fathers and Fathering in Contemporary Contexts Research Conference, May 2012
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: National Center for Family and Marriage Research
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Civic Engagement; Educational Attainment; Fatherhood; Parenthood

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Research Questions:

What are the consequences of having a teen birth on a variety of educational and economic outcomes and on civic engagement?
What are the differences in effects for teen mothers compared to teen fathers?
How have the consequences of teen parenthood changed across cohorts?
How stable are the results across different methods used to account for selection into teen parenthood

Conclusions:

Having a teen birth has negative consequences for a variety of outcomes
Some Consequences are similar for man and Women: Education; Civic engagement measures (except charitable giving)
Other consequences affect women primarily: Charitable giving; Poverty; Food stamp receipt
Many results are robust across multiple methods to account for selection: Education; Charitable giving (for women)
Other results become insignificant when using methods that account for unobservables: Civic engagement measures (except charitable giving); Food stamp receipt; Poverty

Bibliography Citation
Covington, Reginald, William Monson, H. Elizabeth Peters, Joseph P. Price and Joseph J. Sabia. "The Consequences of Teen Fatherhood: A Cohort Comparison of the NLSY79 and NLSY97." Presented: Bethesda MD, National Center for Family and Marriage Research's Fathers and Fathering in Contemporary Contexts Research Conference, May 2012.
3. Covington, Reginald
Peters, H. Elizabeth
Price, Joseph P.
Sabia, Joseph J.
Teen Fatherhood and Educational Attainment: A Cohort Comparison of the NLSY79 and NLSY97
Presented: European Conference On Health Economics (ECHE), July 2012
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: Swiss Association for Health Economics
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Civic Engagement; College Education; Educational Attainment; Fatherhood; High School Completion/Graduates; Parenthood; Propensity Scores; Volunteer Work; Voting Behavior

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using data from two cohorts of youths from the National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth 1979 and 1997 we estimate the effect of teen parenthood on educational attainment. Across a number of econometric strategies designed to control for measured and unmeasured heterogeneity—including propensity score matching, family fixed effects and instrumental variables—we find that teen fatherhood is associated with a lower probability of high school graduation and college attendance. While the magnitudes of the adverse schooling effects are larger for teen mothers than for teen fathers in the NLSY79 cohort, the costs of fatherhood increased in the NLSY97 cohort, narrowing the gap between men and women.
Bibliography Citation
Covington, Reginald, H. Elizabeth Peters, Joseph P. Price and Joseph J. Sabia. "Teen Fatherhood and Educational Attainment: A Cohort Comparison of the NLSY79 and NLSY97." Presented: European Conference On Health Economics (ECHE), July 2012.
4. Covington, Reginald
Peters, H. Elizabeth
Sabia, Joseph J.
Price, Joseph P.
Teen Fatherhood and Educational Attainment: Evidence from Three Cohorts of Youth
Working Paper, Cornell University, October 2011.
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: Department of Economics, Cornell University
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Childbearing, Adolescent; College Enrollment; Educational Attainment; Fatherhood; Gender Differences; High School Completion/Graduates; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Modeling, Instrumental Variables; Pregnancy, Adolescent; Propensity Scores; Teenagers

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

While a large number of studies have explored the schooling effects of teen motherhood, very few have examined the consequences of teen fatherhood. Using data drawn from two cohorts of youth from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 and 1997 (NLSY79 and NLSY97), we examine the relationship between teen parenthood and educational attainment, with careful attention to the role of family- and individual-level unmeasured heterogeneity. We find that teen mothers had a larger schooling penalty than teen fathers in the earlier cohort, but this difference appears to have diminished over time, with men in the NLSY97 cohort having a larger educational penalty than those from the NLSY79 cohort.
Bibliography Citation
Covington, Reginald, H. Elizabeth Peters, Joseph J. Sabia and Joseph P. Price. "Teen Fatherhood and Educational Attainment: Evidence from Three Cohorts of Youth." Working Paper, Cornell University, October 2011.
5. Heiland, Frank
Price, Joseph P.
Maternal Employment and Mother-Child Interaction
Presented: Washington, DC, Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management (APPAM) Annual Fall Research Conference, November 7-9, 2013
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management (APPAM)
Keyword(s): American Time Use Survey (ATUS); Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Maternal Employment; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID); Parent-Child Interaction; Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using data from the NLSY79, PSID-CDS, and ATUS, we estimate the effect of work hours on the total amount of quality time the mother spends with her children. Preliminary results suggest that full-time work is associated with about 40-50 minutes less quality mother-child time each day and specifically less time spent reading together. Differences in quality mother-child interactions for part-time vs. non-working mothers are less pronounced and are not robust to controls for basic demographic characteristics in some cases. Lastly, the results suggest that college educated mothers provide substantially more quality interaction than mothers with less education but this gap is significantly reduced among women who work full-time.
Bibliography Citation
Heiland, Frank and Joseph P. Price. "Maternal Employment and Mother-Child Interaction." Presented: Washington, DC, Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management (APPAM) Annual Fall Research Conference, November 7-9, 2013.
6. Heiland, Frank
Price, Joseph P.
Maternal Employment and Parent-Child Interaction
Presented: New Orleans LA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2013
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): American Time Use Survey (ATUS); Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Maternal Employment; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID); Parent-Child Interaction; Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

A number of studies have examined the effect of maternal employment on child outcomes. Many of these studies provide evidence consistent with a negative influence of maternal employment on child outcomes. We explore one of the mechanisms through which these effects may operate: changes in mother-child interactions. Using data from the NLSY (1979 Cohort), the PSID Child Development Supplement (CDS 1997), and the American Time Use Survey (ATUS 2003-2005), we test for differences in mother-child interactions based on the work hours of the mother. Specifically, using multivariate analyses that utilize the different strengths of the three data sources while emphasizing comparability, we estimate the effect of work hours on the total amount of (quality) time the mother spends with her children (PSID-CDS, ATUS) and the frequency she reads to them (NLSY, PSID-CDS, ATUS). Preliminary results suggest that full-time work is associated with substantial declines in quality mother-child interactions.
Bibliography Citation
Heiland, Frank and Joseph P. Price. "Maternal Employment and Parent-Child Interaction." Presented: New Orleans LA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2013.
7. Lerman, Robert I.
Price, Joseph P.
Wilcox, W. Bradford
Family Structure and Economic Success across the Life Course
Marriage and Family Review 53,8 (2017): 744-758.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/01494929.2017.1316810
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Taylor & Francis Group
Keyword(s): Family Income; Family Structure; Income Dynamics/Shocks; Life Course; Parents, Single

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper examines the role that family structure plays in long-run economic outcomes across the life course. Using nearly 30 years of data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979, we find that youths who grow up with both biological parents earn more income, work more hours each week, and are more likely to be married themselves as adults, compared to children raised in single-parent families. Many of these differences continue to be statistically significant even after we control for family income experienced as an adolescent. In addition, the implied size of the income transfer that children growing up with a single parent to equalize lifetime economic outcomes would need – about $42,000 – is markedly larger than the income transfers now available to families in the United States.
Bibliography Citation
Lerman, Robert I., Joseph P. Price and W. Bradford Wilcox. "Family Structure and Economic Success across the Life Course." Marriage and Family Review 53,8 (2017): 744-758.
8. Peters, H. Elizabeth
Sabia, Joseph J.
Price, Joseph P.
Covington, Reginald
The Effects of Teen and Early Fatherhood on Educational Attainment and Labor Market Outcomes
Presented: Washington, DC, Population Association of America Annual Meetings, March 31-April 2, 2011
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Childbearing, Adolescent; Educational Attainment; Fatherhood; Gender Differences; Labor Market Outcomes; National Education Longitudinal Survey (NELS); Pregnancy, Adolescent; Teenagers

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

A report from the National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy concluded that the public cost of teen births reached $9.1 billion in 2004. Much of the literature on the consequences of teen childbearing has focused on women, although the size of the effects varies widely depending on the techniques used to control for endogeneity. Despite the fact that men's role in fertility is receiving increasing attention, very little work estimates the consequences of early fatherhood. In this paper, we estimate the schooling and labor market consequences for men, using many of the same empirical techniques that have been used for women. We compare the consequences for men and women across three different data sets, the 1979 and 1997 cohorts of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth and the 1988 National Educational Longitudinal Survey, which enable us to analyze changes in the effect of teen parenthood over time.
Bibliography Citation
Peters, H. Elizabeth, Joseph J. Sabia, Joseph P. Price and Reginald Covington. "The Effects of Teen and Early Fatherhood on Educational Attainment and Labor Market Outcomes." Presented: Washington, DC, Population Association of America Annual Meetings, March 31-April 2, 2011.
9. Pope, Bryson
Price, Joseph P.
Lillard, Dean R.
The Impact of Religion on Youth Outcomes
Journal of Business Inquiry 13,1 (2014): 48-60.
Also: http://www.uvu.edu/woodbury/docs/jbivol13_a4.pdf
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Utah Valley University
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Crime; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Monitoring the Future (MTF); Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Propensity Scores; Religion; Risk-Taking; Siblings; Substance Use

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We use data from several nationally representative datasets to estimate the relationship between church attendance and risky behaviors and whether these associations vary when one accounts for selective participation. We use various empirical methods including propensity score matching, sibling and family fixed-effects models, and instrumental variables models that exploit cross-state variation in blue laws. Our results across the different approaches converge into a general pattern that youth with higher church attendance are less likely to commit property or violent crimes, smoke, drink, use drugs, or receive a traffic ticket.
Bibliography Citation
Pope, Bryson, Joseph P. Price and Dean R. Lillard. "The Impact of Religion on Youth Outcomes." Journal of Business Inquiry 13,1 (2014): 48-60.
10. Price, Joseph P.
Parental Time, Family Income, and Child Outcomes
Presented: Chicago, IL, Annual Meeting of the Society of Labor Economists, May 2007.
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: National Opinion Research Center - NORC
Keyword(s): American Time Use Survey (ATUS); Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Birth Order; Family Income; Family Resources; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Parent-Child Interaction; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Siblings

Parents make many decisions that involve a tradeoff between the amount of time and material resources they provide to their children. In this paper I examine to what degree additional family income can compensate for a decrease in parent-child time in terms of child outcomes. I use within-family variation in the amount of parental time and family income that children receive. Parents generally allocate resources equally among their children at each point in time but the amount of resources available to distribute changes over time. This leads the firstborn child to receive considerably more time inputs from his or her parents, especially when the children are spaced further apart. The second born receives a higher level of family income at each age and this difference is larger when the two children are spaced further apart or there is a larger increase in family income.

These patterns indicate that if parental time inputs are important for child outcomes then the birth order differences will be larger in families in which the children are spaced further apart in age. If income at a point in time is important then the birth order gap will be offset in families that experience the largest rise in income. The longitudinal nature of the NSLY allows me to test for differences between siblings in various outcomes (both cognitive and behavioral) based on their birth order and spacing. As an extension, I also impute measures of parental time inputs from the American Time Use Survey onto the NSLY sample. Including both parental time inputs and family income in the same estimation allows me to calculate the rate of technical substitution between time and money in the production of child outcomes. This estimate will provide a benchmark by which to compare policies or practices that encourage parents to exchange their time for additional family income.

Bibliography Citation
Price, Joseph P. "Parental Time, Family Income, and Child Outcomes." Presented: Chicago, IL, Annual Meeting of the Society of Labor Economists, May 2007.
11. Price, Joseph P.
The Effect of Parental Time Investments: Evidence from Natural Within-Family Variation
Working Paper, Department of Economics, Brigham Young University, 2010
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Brigham Young University
Keyword(s): American Time Use Survey (ATUS); Birth Order; Births, Repeat / Spacing; Family Income; Family Resources; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Modeling, Fixed Effects; Parent-Child Interaction; Parental Investments; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT); Siblings; Time Use

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Firstborn children receive more parental time investments, and this difference is larger when children are spaced further apart in age. I use this natural within-family variation to estimate the effect of parental time investments on children’s reading test scores. Having an instrumental variable for parent–child reading is crucial since parents invest more time with the lower-performing child, leading to downward bias of the effects of parental time investments. I find that an extra day per week of parent–child reading during the first ten years of life raises a child’s performance on standardized reading tests by about half of a standard deviation.
Bibliography Citation
Price, Joseph P. "The Effect of Parental Time Investments: Evidence from Natural Within-Family Variation." Working Paper, Department of Economics, Brigham Young University, 2010.
12. Price, Joseph P.
Time vs. Money: Which Resources Matter for Children?
Working Paper, Department of Economics, Brigham Young University, 2007.
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Brigham Young University
Keyword(s): American Time Use Survey (ATUS); Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Birth Order; Family Resources; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Siblings

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Parents face a number of decisions that involve a trade-off between the amount of time and money they can provide their children. This paper estimates the relative impact of parental time and family income on child outcomes. Parents generally allocate resources equally among their children at each point in time but the amount of resources available to distribute changes over time. As a result the first-born child gets more parental time while the second child experiences a higher level of family income at each age. Using this within-family variation in resources received by each child, I find that for the average family an hour of quality parent-child quality interaction produces the same amount of reading achievement as $172 of additional family income. Parental time inputs also decrease measures of behavior problems but neither time nor family income appear to influence math achievement.
Bibliography Citation
Price, Joseph P. "Time vs. Money: Which Resources Matter for Children?" Working Paper, Department of Economics, Brigham Young University, 2007.
13. Price, Joseph P.
Time vs. Money: Which Resources Matter for Children?
Presented: New Orleans, LA, Population Association of America (PAA) 2008 Annual Meeting, April 17-19, 2008.
Also: http://paa2008.princeton.edu/abstractViewer.aspx?submissionId=80485
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): American Time Use Survey (ATUS); Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Birth Order; Family Income; Family Resources; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Parent-Child Interaction; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Siblings

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Parents face a number of decisions that involve a trade-off between the amount of time and money they can provide their children. This paper estimates the relative impact of parental time and family income on child outcomes. I exploit the fact that first-born child gets more parental time while the second child experiences a higher level of family income at each age and that these differences are larger when children are spaced further apart. Using this within-family variation in resources received by each child, I find that for the average family an hour of quality parent-child quality interaction produces the same amount of reading achievement as over $100 of additional family income. Parental time inputs also decrease measures of behavior problems but neither time nor family income appear to influence math achievement.
Bibliography Citation
Price, Joseph P. "Time vs. Money: Which Resources Matter for Children?" Presented: New Orleans, LA, Population Association of America (PAA) 2008 Annual Meeting, April 17-19, 2008.
14. Price, Joseph P.
Kalil, Ariel
The Effect of Mother-Child Reading Time on Children's Reading Skills: Evidence From Natural Within‐Family Variation
Child Development 90,6 (November/December 2019): e688-e702.
Also: https://srcd.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/cdev.13137
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Achievement; Parent-Child Interaction; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT)

Children's exposure to book reading is thought to be an influential input into positive cognitive development. Yet there is little empirical research identifying whether it is reading time per se, or other factors associated with families who read, such as parental education or children's reading skill, that improves children's achievement. Using data on 4,239 children ages 0-13 of the female respondents of the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, this study applies two different methodologies to identify the causal impact of mother-child reading time on children's achievement scores by controlling for several confounding child and family characteristics. The results show that a 1 SD increase in mother-child reading time increases children's reading achievement by 0.80 SDs.
Bibliography Citation
Price, Joseph P. and Ariel Kalil. "The Effect of Mother-Child Reading Time on Children's Reading Skills: Evidence From Natural Within‐Family Variation." Child Development 90,6 (November/December 2019): e688-e702.
15. Price, Joseph P.
Swigert, Jeffrey
Within-Family Variation in Obesity
Economics and Human Biology 10,4 (December 2012): 333-339.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1570677X1200069X
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Body Mass Index (BMI); Childhood; Obesity; Siblings; Weight

We use data from the Children of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 to document the degree to which childhood obesity varies among siblings. We find considerable differences in body weight between siblings with over half of the siblings differing by more than 20 age-specific percentiles in terms of the body mass index. Even among identical twins, there is an average BMI difference of 12 percentiles. This variation is important for the use of econometric approaches that involve sibling comparisons.
Bibliography Citation
Price, Joseph P. and Jeffrey Swigert. "Within-Family Variation in Obesity." Economics and Human Biology 10,4 (December 2012): 333-339.
16. Price, Joseph P.
Tappen, Henry
Intra-Household Transfers While Children are Still at Home
Presented: Detroit, MI, Population Association of America Meetings, April-May 2009
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): American Time Use Survey (ATUS); Family Resources; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness; Siblings; Time Use; Transfers, Parental

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Past research has focused on the degree to which bequests and inter-vivo transfers are allocated equally among an individual's children. This research has largely ignored how resources are allocated among children who are still at home. We use data from the NLSY, American Times Use Survey, and Census PUMS, to look sibling differences in parent-child time and frequency of being read to (as time investments), and enrollment in a private school (as a money investment). We find that parents allocate time and money resources to each of their children equally about 60-70% of the time (providing evidence of an equity motive that is in line with measures of bequest behavior). We also explore some of the factors that influence families to deviate from an equitable allocation.
Bibliography Citation
Price, Joseph P. and Henry Tappen. "Intra-Household Transfers While Children are Still at Home." Presented: Detroit, MI, Population Association of America Meetings, April-May 2009.
17. Sabia, Joseph J.
Price, Joseph P.
Peters, H. Elizabeth
Covington, Reginald
The Effect on Teenage Childbearing on Social Capital Development: New Evidence on Civic Engagement
Review of Economics of the Household 16,3 (September 2018): 629-659.
Also: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11150-017-9371-3
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Civic Engagement; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Mothers, Adolescent; Parenthood; Political Attitudes/Behaviors/Efficacy; Social Capital; Volunteer Work; Voting Behavior

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 (NLSY97), we examine the relationship between teenage childbearing and four measures of adult civic engagement: charitable giving, volunteerism, political awareness, and voting. After accounting for selection on observables via propensity score matching and selection on unobservables via family fixed effects and instrumental variables approaches, we find that teen motherhood is negatively related to adult civic engagement. Descriptive evidence suggests that teen birth-induced reductions in educational attainment and the time-intensive nature of childcare are important mechanisms. Finally, we find that while the adverse civic engagement effects of teen parenthood may extend to teen fathers, the effects are much smaller in magnitude.
Bibliography Citation
Sabia, Joseph J., Joseph P. Price, H. Elizabeth Peters and Reginald Covington. "The Effect on Teenage Childbearing on Social Capital Development: New Evidence on Civic Engagement." Review of Economics of the Household 16,3 (September 2018): 629-659.