Search Results

Source: Journal of Youth and Adolescence
Resulting in 21 citations.
1. Black, Sarah R.
Klein, Daniel N.
Early Menarcheal Age and Risk for Later Depressive Symptomatology: The Role of Childhood Depressive Symptoms
Journal of Youth and Adolescence 41,9 (September 2012): 1142-1150.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/6x2u02179l7u67j5/
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Age at Menarche; Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Child Growth; Children, Mental Health; Depression (see also CESD)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Previous research has investigated the relationship between pubertal timing and depression in girls, with most results suggesting that earlier menarche predicts more depression in adolescence. However, few studies have controlled for the potentially confounding effects of childhood depressive symptoms. The current study uses a prospective, longitudinal sample of 1,185 girls (47.8 % Caucasian) to examine the relationships between pubertal timing, childhood depressive symptoms, and adolescent depressive symptomatology. Using multiple linear regression analyses, our results suggest that higher levels of childhood depressive symptoms and earlier menarche have independent effects on adolescent depressive symptoms. Surprisingly, childhood depressive symptomatology predicted later age of menarche, although the magnitude of this effect was small. Taken together, the results suggest that early childhood depressive symptoms and early menarche represent independent pathways to later depressive symptoms.
Bibliography Citation
Black, Sarah R. and Daniel N. Klein. "Early Menarcheal Age and Risk for Later Depressive Symptomatology: The Role of Childhood Depressive Symptoms ." Journal of Youth and Adolescence 41,9 (September 2012): 1142-1150.
2. Carlson, Daniel L.
McNulty, Thomas L.
Bellair, Paul E.
Watts, Stephen J.
Neighborhoods and Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Adolescent Sexual Risk Behavior
Journal of Youth and Adolescence 43,9 (September 2014): 1536-1549.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10964-013-0052-0/fulltext.html
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Ethnic Differences; Geocoded Data; Neighborhood Effects; Poverty; Racial Differences; Risk-Taking; Sexual Activity; Sexual Behavior; Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs); Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Understanding the determinants of racial/ethnic disparities in adolescent sexual risk behavior is important given its links to the differential risk of teen pregnancy, childbearing, and sexually transmitted infections. This article tests a contextual model that emphasizes the concentration of neighborhood disadvantage in shaping racial/ethnic disparities in sexual risk behavior. We focus on two risk behaviors that are prevalent among Black and Hispanic youth: the initiation of sexual activity in adolescence and the number of sex partners. Using data from the 1997 National Longitudinal Study of Youth (N = 6,985; 48% female; 57% non-Hispanic White) evidence indicates that neighborhood disadvantage—measured by concentrated poverty, unemployment rates, and the proportion of female-headed households—partially explains Black and Hispanic disparities from Whites in the odds of adolescent sexual debut, although the prevalence of female-headed households in neighborhoods appears to be the main driver in this domain. Likewise, accounting for neighborhood disadvantage reduces the Black-White and Hispanic-White disparity in the number of sexual partners, although less so relative to sexual debut. We discuss theoretical and practical implications of these findings.
Bibliography Citation
Carlson, Daniel L., Thomas L. McNulty, Paul E. Bellair and Stephen J. Watts. "Neighborhoods and Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Adolescent Sexual Risk Behavior." Journal of Youth and Adolescence 43,9 (September 2014): 1536-1549.
3. Connolly, Eric J.
Kavish, Nicholas
The Causal Relationship between Childhood Adversity and Developmental Trajectories of Delinquency: A Consideration of Genetic and Environmental Confounds
Journal of Youth and Adolescence published online (23 November 2018): DOI: 10.1007/s10964-018-0960-0.
Also: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10964-018-0960-0
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Childhood Adversity/Trauma; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Genetics; Modeling, Growth Curve/Latent Trajectory Analysis; Siblings

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

An extensive line of research has found that children exposed to multiple forms of early life adversity are more likely to engage in high levels of delinquent behavior during adolescence. Several studies examining this association have used a range of multivariate statistical techniques capable of controlling for observable covariates. Fewer studies have used family-based research designs to additionally control for unobservable confounds, such as genetic and shared environmental influences, that may be associated with exposure to childhood adversity and delinquency. The current study analyzes self-report data on 2534 full-siblings (50% female) from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 to conduct a sibling-comparison analysis to provide a rigorous test of the causal hypothesis that exposure to childhood adversity causes differences in developmental patterns of delinquent behavior. Results from multivariate latent growth curve models revealed that childhood adversity was associated with higher starting levels of delinquency during adolescence and slower rates of decline from adolescence to emerging adulthood. Results from multivariate sibling-comparison models, however, revealed that siblings exposed to higher levels of childhood adversity reported higher starting levels of delinquent behavior, but not slower declines over time, suggesting that childhood adversity may not be directly associated with long-term patterns of delinquent behavior after genetic and shared environmental factors are taken into account. Implications of these results for future research are discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Connolly, Eric J. and Nicholas Kavish. "The Causal Relationship between Childhood Adversity and Developmental Trajectories of Delinquency: A Consideration of Genetic and Environmental Confounds." Journal of Youth and Adolescence published online (23 November 2018): DOI: 10.1007/s10964-018-0960-0.
4. Connolly, Eric J.
Schwartz, Joseph A.
Nedelec, Joseph L.
Beaver, Kevin M.
Barnes, J. C.
Different Slopes for Different Folks: Genetic Influences on Growth in Delinquent Peer Association and Delinquency During Adolescence
Journal of Youth and Adolescence 44,7 (July 2015): 1413-1427.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10964-015-0299-8/fulltext.html
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS); Delinquency/Gang Activity; Genetics; Kinship; Modeling, Growth Curve/Latent Trajectory Analysis; Peers/Peer influence/Peer relations; Siblings

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

An extensive line of research has identified delinquent peer association as a salient environmental risk factor for delinquency, especially during adolescence. While previous research has found moderate-to-strong associations between exposure to delinquent peers and a variety of delinquent behaviors, comparatively less scholarship has focused on the genetic architecture of this association over the course of adolescence. Using a subsample of kinship pairs (N = 2379; 52% female) from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth--Child and Young Adult Supplement (CNLSY), the present study examined the extent to which correlated individual differences in starting levels and developmental growth in delinquent peer pressure and self-reported delinquency were explained by additive genetic and environmental influences. Results from a series of biometric growth models revealed that 37% of the variance in correlated growth between delinquent peer pressure and self-reported delinquency was explained by additive genetic effects, while nonshared environmental effects accounted for the remaining 63% of the variance. Implications of these findings for interpreting the nexus between peer effects and adolescent delinquency are discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Connolly, Eric J., Joseph A. Schwartz, Joseph L. Nedelec, Kevin M. Beaver and J. C. Barnes. "Different Slopes for Different Folks: Genetic Influences on Growth in Delinquent Peer Association and Delinquency During Adolescence." Journal of Youth and Adolescence 44,7 (July 2015): 1413-1427.
5. Eamon, Mary Keegan
Influences and Mediators of the Effect of Poverty on Young Adolescent Depressive Symptoms
Journal of Youth and Adolescence 31,3 (June 2002): 231-242.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/f0kc22b3dbwbxrfl/
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Plenum Publishing Corporation
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Behavioral Problems; Depression (see also CESD); Disadvantaged, Economically; Health, Mental; Mothers, Health; Neighborhood Effects; Parenting Skills/Styles; Poverty; Punishment, Corporal

Data from a sample of young adolescents between the ages of 10 and 12 years (N = 898) from the mother-child data set of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth were analyzed in a study of influences that explain the relation between poverty and depressive symptoms measured 2 years later. Other variables that predicted youth depressive symptoms were also identified. Results indicated that neighborhood problems, nonparticipation in outside school and neighborhood activities, residing with mothers who exhibited depressive symptoms, and mother's use of physical punishment were partial mediators of the effect of poverty on depressive symptoms 2 years later. Youth health status, lower levels of school satisfaction, marital-partner conflict, and father's emotional support also predicted depressive symptoms. The findings indicate that youth depressive symptoms are multiply determined and that poverty can adversely affect young adolescents in many ways.
Bibliography Citation
Eamon, Mary Keegan. "Influences and Mediators of the Effect of Poverty on Young Adolescent Depressive Symptoms." Journal of Youth and Adolescence 31,3 (June 2002): 231-242.
6. Eamon, Mary Keegan
Social-Demographic, School, Neighborhood, and Parenting Influences on the Academic Achievement of Latino Young Adolescents
Journal of Youth and Adolescence 34,2 (April 2005): 163-174.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/vx1g53u4h8770300/
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Kluwer Academic Publishers
Keyword(s): Academic Development; Age at First Birth; Childbearing; Educational Attainment; Hispanic Youth; Hispanics; Neighborhood Effects; Parenting Skills/Styles; Poverty

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using data from a national sample of 388 Latino young adolescents, this study identified the social-demographic characteristics, influences in the broader social environment, and parenting practices that predict youth academic achievement. Youths who were Mexican-American, older, and had an English language problem had lower levels of reading and mathematics achievement. Youths of mothers who began childbearing at older agesr, had higher levels of intellectual abilities, and reported no English language problem scored better on both types of achievement tests, but poverty was related only to reading achievement. Attendance in higher-rated schools was associated with higher reading and mathematics scores, but residence in better quality neighborhoods was related only to reading achievement. Three parenting practices "providing cognitive stimulation, parent-youth conflict, and academic involvement" predicted both types of achievement. The effect of poverty on reading achievement was explained by residence in lower quality neighborhoods, lower levels of cognitive stimulation, and parent-youth conflict.
Bibliography Citation
Eamon, Mary Keegan. "Social-Demographic, School, Neighborhood, and Parenting Influences on the Academic Achievement of Latino Young Adolescents." Journal of Youth and Adolescence 34,2 (April 2005): 163-174.
7. Frantz, Roger Scott
The Effect of Early Labor Market Experience upon Internal-External Locus of Control Among Young Male Workers
Journal of Youth and Adolescence 9,3 (June 1980): 203-210.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/p1k6504j481760q4/
Cohort(s): Young Men
Publisher: Plenum Publishing Corporation
Keyword(s): Educational Attainment; Employment; Internal-External Attitude; Locus of Control (see Rotter Scale); Rotter Scale (see Locus of Control); Transition, School to Work; Wages; Work Attitudes

This study examined the influence of some personal and labor market factors on changes in internal-external control among young male workers. Utilizing 960 male respondents in a multiple regression analysis and an abbreviated version of the Rotter Internal-External Control Scale, this study found that labor market success, race, and employment in the private sector enhance feelings of internal control during the transition between school and work.
Bibliography Citation
Frantz, Roger Scott. "The Effect of Early Labor Market Experience upon Internal-External Locus of Control Among Young Male Workers." Journal of Youth and Adolescence 9,3 (June 1980): 203-210.
8. Hendrick, C. Emily
Cance, Jessica Duncan
Maslowsky, Julie
Peer and Individual Risk Factors in Adolescence Explaining the Relationship Between Girls' Pubertal Timing and Teenage Childbearing
Journal of Youth and Adolescence 45,5 (May 2016): 916-927.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10964-016-0413-6/fulltext.html
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Age at Menarche; Childbearing, Adolescent; Modeling, Structural Equation; Peers/Peer influence/Peer relations; Sexual Experiences/Virginity; Substance Use

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Girls with early pubertal timing are at elevated risk for teenage childbearing; however, the modifiable mechanisms driving this relationship are not well understood. The objective of the current study was to determine whether substance use, perceived peer substance use, and older first sexual partners mediate the relationships among girls' pubertal timing, sexual debut, and teenage childbearing. Data are from Waves 1-15 of the female cohort of the National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth 1997 (NLSY97), a nationwide, ongoing cohort study of U.S. men and women born between 1980 and 1984. The analytic sample (n = 2066) was 12-14 years old in 1997 and ethnically diverse (51% white, 27% black, 22% Latina). Using structural equation modeling, we found substance use in early adolescence and perceived peer substance use each partially mediated the relationships among girls' pubertal timing, sexual debut, and teenage childbearing. Our findings suggest early substance use behavior as one modifiable mechanism to be targeted by interventions aimed at preventing teenage childbearing among early developing girls.
Bibliography Citation
Hendrick, C. Emily, Jessica Duncan Cance and Julie Maslowsky. "Peer and Individual Risk Factors in Adolescence Explaining the Relationship Between Girls' Pubertal Timing and Teenage Childbearing." Journal of Youth and Adolescence 45,5 (May 2016): 916-927.
9. Johnson, Katherine A.
Tyler, Kimberly A.
Adolescent Sexual Onset: An Intergenerational Analysis
Journal of Youth and Adolescence 36,7 (October 2007): 939-949.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/p86412573k14132m/
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Kluwer Academic Publishers
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Adolescent Fertility; Age at First Intercourse; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Sexual Activity; Sexual Behavior

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Adolescents have begun to initiate sexual activity at increasingly early ages in the past few decades. Using a sample of 2,494 adolescents from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY97), structural and parental process variables were examined in the prediction of sexual onset. Results indicated that the age at which youth initiate sexual intercourse is related to the structural characteristics of their grandmothers and mothers, as well as puberty, gender, and race. There is support for partial mediation of the effects of these grandmother characteristics via mother characteristics and parental process. Results are discussed within the framework of the life course perspective and provide support for the importance of previous generations in the explanation of adolescent sexual behavior. Implications for families and adolescents are also addressed. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

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Bibliography Citation
Johnson, Katherine A. and Kimberly A. Tyler. "Adolescent Sexual Onset: An Intergenerational Analysis ." Journal of Youth and Adolescence 36,7 (October 2007): 939-949.
10. Killoren, Sarah E.
Deutsch, Arielle R.
A Longitudinal Examination of Parenting Processes and Latino Youth's Risky Sexual Behaviors
Journal of Youth and Adolescence 43,12 (December 2014): 1982-1993.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10964-013-0053-z
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Age at First Intercourse; Contraception; Gender Differences; Hispanic Studies; Hispanic Youth; Parental Influences; Parenting Skills/Styles; Risk-Taking; Sexual Behavior

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Latino adolescents engage in riskier sexual behaviors compared to their peers, shown by their higher rates of sexually transmitted infections and lower rates of condom usage; therefore, examining the precursors and correlates of these risky sexual behaviors is important for prevention-intervention program development. Based on cultural-ecological, symbolic interaction, and gender socialization perspectives, we examined associations among mothers' and fathers' parenting and Latino youth's sexual risk over a 5 year period. Further, we investigated the direct and moderating roles of acculturation (e.g., language spoken in the home), nativity (e.g., citizenship status), and adolescents' gender. Using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Youth (N = 1,899 Latino youth; 49 % female), we conducted a multi-level path model controlling for adolescents' age and prior sexual experience. Our findings revealed that more strictness by mothers and less strictness by fathers at Time 1 were related to lower sexual risk for adolescents at Time 2. Additionally, more monitoring by fathers at Time 2 was associated with lower sexual risk for adolescents at Time 3. Significant gender differences were found such that there were stronger associations among parenting processes and sexual risk for girls than for boys. Finally, we found support for the immigrant paradox (foreign-born youth reported lower sexual risk than US-born youth) and greater gender differences (boys had riskier sexual behaviors than girls) for immigrant compared to US-born youth. The findings reveal the complex associations among parenting processes, nativity status, gender, and sexual risk for Latino adolescents.
Bibliography Citation
Killoren, Sarah E. and Arielle R. Deutsch. "A Longitudinal Examination of Parenting Processes and Latino Youth's Risky Sexual Behaviors." Journal of Youth and Adolescence 43,12 (December 2014): 1982-1993.
11. Leech, Tamara G. J.
Dias, Janice Johnson
Risky Sexual Behavior: A Race-specific Social Consequence of Obesity
Journal of Youth and Adolescence 41,1 (January 2012): 41-52.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/6284230713656545/
Cohort(s): NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Body Mass Index (BMI); Health Factors; Obesity; Propensity Scores; Racial Differences; Risk-Taking; Sexual Behavior; Weight

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Scant attention has been given to the consequence of actual weight status for adolescents' sexual wellbeing. In this article, we investigate the race-specific connection between obesity and risky sexual behavior among adolescent girls. Propensity scores and radius matching are used to analyze a sample of 340 adolescents aged 16-17 who participated in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth Young Adult Survey in 2000 or 2002. Nearly even numbers of these participants identified as white and black (183 and 157, respectively). We find that compared to their non-obese white peers, obese white adolescent girls exhibit higher rates of multiple sex partners and sex with older partners, and are also less likely to use condoms. None of these factors are significantly related to high BMI within the black sample. These findings indicate that the negative social consequences of obesity extend beyond future economic and marriage outcomes to adolescent white women's sexual outcomes. They also highlight the importance of context: the implications of being obese during adolescence depend on cultural meanings of obesity.
Bibliography Citation
Leech, Tamara G. J. and Janice Johnson Dias. "Risky Sexual Behavior: A Race-specific Social Consequence of Obesity." Journal of Youth and Adolescence 41,1 (January 2012): 41-52.
12. Luster, Thomas
Dubow, Eric F.
Predictors of the Quality of the Home Environment Adolescent Mothers Provide for Their School-Age Children
Journal of Youth and Adolescence 19,5 (October 1990): 475-494.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/jp745433m0193500/
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Plenum Publishing Corporation
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Children; Children, Home Environment; Family Structure; General Assessment; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Mothers, Adolescent; Parenting Skills/Styles; Peers/Peer influence/Peer relations; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

The primary question addressed in this study is: what factors distinguish between adolescent mothers with school-age children who are providing relatively supportive home environments for their children, and their peers who are providing less supportive care? Data from the Children of the NLSY data set were used to address this question. Variables from four major categories were useful in identifying mothers who were at greatest risk for providing less supportive environments: (1) characteristics of the mother, (2) characteristics of the family of origin, (3) current SES level, and (4) the composition of the mother's household.
Bibliography Citation
Luster, Thomas and Eric F. Dubow. "Predictors of the Quality of the Home Environment Adolescent Mothers Provide for Their School-Age Children." Journal of Youth and Adolescence 19,5 (October 1990): 475-494.
13. Moilanen, Kristin L.
Shen, Yuh-Ling
Mastery in Middle Adolescence: The Contributions of Socioeconomic Status, Maternal Mastery and Supportive-Involved Mothering
Journal of Youth and Adolescence 43, 2 (February 2014): 298-310.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10964-013-9951-3
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Chores (see Housework); Discipline; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Parent Supervision/Monitoring; Parent-Child Interaction; Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness; Parental Influences; Parenting Skills/Styles; Parents, Behavior; Pearlin Mastery Scale; Self-Perception; Socioeconomic Status (SES); Well-Being

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Mastery, or the feeling of power or control over one’s life, is a vital yet understudied covariate of wellbeing in adolescence and adulthood. The goal of the current study was to explore the effects of demographic characteristics (i.e., sex, age, race/ethnicity, and socioeconomic status (SES)), maternal mastery, and supportive-involved mothering on children’s mastery at ages 16–17 years. 855 teens (47.6% female) and their mothers provided study data as part of the 1992 and 1998 waves of National Longitudinal Survey of Youth-1979 (NLSY-79; 24.1% Hispanic, 36.6% Black). Hybrid path models indicated that only maternal parenting during middle childhood was linked directly to levels of children’s mastery in middle adolescence; a small portion of the association between parenting and adolescent mastery was attributable to SES. The discussion centers on significance of these findings for future research and theory development.
Bibliography Citation
Moilanen, Kristin L. and Yuh-Ling Shen. "Mastery in Middle Adolescence: The Contributions of Socioeconomic Status, Maternal Mastery and Supportive-Involved Mothering." Journal of Youth and Adolescence 43, 2 (February 2014): 298-310.
14. Murphy, Debra A.
Brecht, Mary-Lynn
Herbeck, Diane M.
Huang, David Y.C.
Trajectories of HIV Risk Behavior from Age 15 to 25 in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth Sample
Journal of Youth and Adolescence 38,9 (October 2009): 1226-1239.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/55uv2631025x1645/
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Kluwer Academic Publishers
Keyword(s): Adolescent Sexual Activity; Alcohol Use; Immigrants; Military Personnel; Racial Differences; Risk-Taking; Rural/Urban Differences; Sexual Activity; Sexual Behavior; Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs); Teenagers

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study utilized data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth to investigate youth risk trajectories for HIV and factors associated with different trajectories. The sample ( N = 8,208) was 49.2% female, with a mean age of 14.31 ( SD = 1.48). A group-based trajectory model was applied, which identified four distinct trajectories for both males and females: (1) consistently higher sexual risk levels, increasing to early adulthood followed by some decrease ("high"); (2) a short period of increase to late teens, followed by a longer period of decrease ("decreased"); (3) an initially slow increase, with the increase accelerating by late teens, and a slight decline beginning in early adulthood ("increased"); and (4) consistently lowest levels of sexual risk ("low"). More African Americans were found among the decreased trajectory group; among the low risk group a higher number of youth came from families with parents who spoke a language other than English. The high-risk group had a higher percentage of subjects in non-metropolitan areas and highest alcohol use. Among males, being employed and being in the military were associated with inclusion in the high-risk group. Results have implications for specializing prevention strategies for youth with different patterns of sexual risk. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Murphy, Debra A., Mary-Lynn Brecht, Diane M. Herbeck and David Y.C. Huang. "Trajectories of HIV Risk Behavior from Age 15 to 25 in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth Sample." Journal of Youth and Adolescence 38,9 (October 2009): 1226-1239.
15. Nichols, Emily Bever
Loper, Ann Booker
Incarceration in the Household: Academic Outcomes of Adolescents with an Incarcerated Household Member
Journal of Youth and Adolescence 41,11 (November 2012): 1455-1471.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/e40v4v88457x071r/
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Economic Well-Being; Educational Outcomes; Fathers, Absence; High School Completion/Graduates; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Household Composition; Incarceration/Jail; Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT); Stress

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The United States has the highest incarceration rate in the world, yet there is relatively little information on how the removal of these adults from households impacts the youth who are left behind. This study used a child-centered lens to examine the impact of incarceration on the school outcomes of youth who resided with a family member or family associate who was incarcerated prior to the youth’s 18th birthday. We used data from 11 waves of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth: Child and Young Adult (n = 3,338, 53 % female). Initial analyses indicated that youth who experienced a household members’ incarceration evidenced more socioeconomic challenges, more frequent home adversities, and lower cognitive skills relative to youth who did not experience a household members’ incarceration. Results also revealed that youth who had experienced a household member’s incarceration were more likely to report extended absence from school and were less likely to graduate from high school relative to those youth who did not experience a household members’ incarceration. Counter to our hypotheses, results revealed the incarceration of an extended family member being in the household was the only relation significantly associated with worse school outcomes. Plausibly, families who allow non-immediate criminally involved individuals to reside in the household are experiencing a more pervasive chaotic home environment than those with a parent or sibling incarcerated. Our study suggests that efforts to address the needs of children with incarcerated parents need to be widened to those who experience the loss of any household member due to incarceration.
Bibliography Citation
Nichols, Emily Bever and Ann Booker Loper. "Incarceration in the Household: Academic Outcomes of Adolescents with an Incarcerated Household Member." Journal of Youth and Adolescence 41,11 (November 2012): 1455-1471.
16. Paschall, Katherine W.
Gershoff, Elizabeth Thompson
Kuhfeld, Megan
A Two Decade Examination of Historical Race/Ethnicity Disparities in Academic Achievement by Poverty Status
Journal of Youth and Adolescence 47,6 (June 2018): 1164-1177.
Also: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10964-017-0800-7
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Children, Academic Development; Children, Poverty; Ethnic Differences; Family Income; Household Income; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT); Poverty; Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Research on achievement gaps by race/ethnicity and poverty status typically focuses on each gap separately, and recent syntheses suggest the poverty gap is growing while racial/ethnic gaps are narrowing. In this study, we used time-varying effect modeling to examine the interaction of race/ethnicity and poverty gaps in math and reading achievement from 1986-2005 for poor and non-poor White, Black, and Hispanic students in three age groups (5-6, 9-10, and 13-14). We found that across this twenty-year period, the gaps between poor White students and their poor Black and Hispanic peers grew, while the gap between non-poor Whites and Hispanics narrowed. We conclude that understanding the nature of achievement gaps requires simultaneous examination of race/ethnicity and income.
Bibliography Citation
Paschall, Katherine W., Elizabeth Thompson Gershoff and Megan Kuhfeld. "A Two Decade Examination of Historical Race/Ethnicity Disparities in Academic Achievement by Poverty Status." Journal of Youth and Adolescence 47,6 (June 2018): 1164-1177.
17. Shandra, Carrie L.
Chowdhury, Afra R.
The First Sexual Experience Among Adolescent Girls With and Without Disabilities
Journal of Youth and Adolescence 41,4 (April 2012): 515-532.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/k6347173572k2635/
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Age at First Intercourse; Contraception; Disability; Life Course; Pregnancy and Pregnancy Outcomes

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

First sexual intercourse is an important experience in the young adult life course. While previous research has examined racial, gender, and socioeconomic differences in the characteristics of first sexual intercourse, less is known about differences by disability status. Using a racially diverse (27% Black, 20% Hispanic, and 53% non-Hispanic white) sample of 2,729 adolescent girls aged 12-24 at first sexual intercourse from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997, this article examines the association between disability and type of first sexual relationship, degree of discussion about birth control, and pregnancy wantedness. Regression analyses indicate that girls with mild or learning or emotional disabilities experience first sexual intercourse in different types of relationships than girls without disabilities. Adolescents with learning or emotional conditions have greater levels of discussion about birth control with their first sexual partners than those without disabilities. In addition, among those who do not use birth control at first sexual intercourse, girls with multiple or seriously limiting conditions are more likely to want a pregnancy-versus not want a pregnancy-at first sexual intercourse. Findings indicate that disability status is important to consider when examining adolescent sexuality; however, not all youth with disabilities have equal experiences.
Bibliography Citation
Shandra, Carrie L. and Afra R. Chowdhury. "The First Sexual Experience Among Adolescent Girls With and Without Disabilities." Journal of Youth and Adolescence 41,4 (April 2012): 515-532.
18. Shulman, Elizabeth P.
Steinberg, Laurence D.
Piquero, Alex R.
The Age–Crime Curve in Adolescence and Early Adulthood is Not Due to Age Differences in Economic Status
Journal of Youth and Adolescence 42,6 (June 2013): 848-850.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10964-013-9950-4
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Arrests; Crime; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Poverty; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

One of the most consistent findings in developmental criminology is the “age–crime curve”—the observation that criminal behavior increases in adolescence and decreases in adulthood. Recently, Brown and Males (Justice Policy J 8:1–30, 2011) conducted an analysis of aggregate arrest, poverty, and population data from California and concluded that the widely-observed adolescent peak in rates of offending is not a consequence of developmental factors, but rather an artifact of age differences in economic status. Youngsters, they argue, offend more than adults because they are poorer than adults. The present study challenges Brown and Males’ proposition by analyzing data from the National Longitudinal Study of Youth (NLSY97; N = 8,984; 51 % female; 26 % Black, 21 % Hispanic, 52 % non-Black, non-Hispanic; ages 12–18 at Wave 1), which collected measures of criminal behavior and economic status at multiple time points. Consistent with scores of other studies, we find that criminal offending peaks in adolescence, even after controlling for variation in economic status. Our findings both counter Brown and Males’ claim that the age–crime curve is illusory and underscore the danger of drawing inferences about individual behavior from analysis of aggregated data.
Bibliography Citation
Shulman, Elizabeth P., Laurence D. Steinberg and Alex R. Piquero. "The Age–Crime Curve in Adolescence and Early Adulthood is Not Due to Age Differences in Economic Status." Journal of Youth and Adolescence 42,6 (June 2013): 848-850.
19. Sipsma, Heather L.
Ickovics, Jeannette R.
Lin, Haiqun
Kershaw, Trace
The Impact of Future Expectations on Adolescent Sexual Risk Behavior
Journal of Youth and Adolescence 44,1 (January 2015): 170-183.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10964-013-0082-7
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Age at First Birth; Contraception; Expectations/Intentions; Modeling, Latent Class Analysis/Latent Transition Analysis; Sexual Behavior; Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Rates of STIs, HIV, and pregnancy remain high among adolescents in the US, and recent approaches to reducing sexual risk have shown limited success. Future expectations, or the extent to which one expects an event to actually occur, may influence sexual risk behavior. This prospective study uses longitudinal data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 (n = 3,205 adolescents; 49.8 % female) to examine the impact of previously derived latent classes of future expectations on sexual risk behavior. Cox regression and latent growth models were used to determine the effect of future expectations on age at first biological child, number of sexual partners, and inconsistent contraception use. The results indicate that classes of future expectations were uniquely associated with each outcome. The latent class reporting expectations of drinking and being arrested was consistently associated with the greatest risks of engaging in sexual risk behavior compared with the referent class, which reported expectations of attending school and little engagement in delinquent behaviors. The class reporting expectations of attending school and drinking was associated with having greater numbers of sexual partners and inconsistent contraception use but not with age at first biological child. The third class, defined by expectations of victimization, was not associated with any outcome in adjusted models, despite being associated with being younger at the birth of their first child in the unadjusted analysis. Gender moderated specific associations between latent classes and sexual risk outcomes. Future expectations, conceptualized as a multidimensional construct, may have a unique ability to explain sexual risk behaviors over time. Future strategies should target multiple expectations and use multiple levels of influence to improve individual future expectations prior to high school and throughout the adolescent period.
Bibliography Citation
Sipsma, Heather L., Jeannette R. Ickovics, Haiqun Lin and Trace Kershaw. "The Impact of Future Expectations on Adolescent Sexual Risk Behavior." Journal of Youth and Adolescence 44,1 (January 2015): 170-183.
20. Vaughan, Erikka B.
Van Hulle, Carol A.
Beasley, William H.
Rodgers, Joseph Lee
D'Onofrio, Brian M.
Clarifying the Associations between Age at Menarche and Adolescent Emotional and Behavioral Problems
Journal of Youth and Adolescence 44,4 (April 2015): 922-939.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10964-015-0255-7
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Age at First Intercourse; Age at Menarche; Behavior Problems Index (BPI); CESD (Depression Scale); Crime; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Kinship; Modeling, Multilevel; Siblings

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Better understanding risk factors for the development of adolescent emotional and behavioral problems can help with intervention and prevention efforts. Previous studies have found that an early menarcheal age predicts several adolescent problems, including depressive symptoms, delinquency, and early age at first intercourse. Few studies, nevertheless, have explicitly tested (a) whether the associations with menarcheal age vary across racial/ethnic groups or (b) whether the sources of the associations are within-families (i.e., consistent with a direct, causal link) or only between-families (i.e., due to selection or confounding factors). The current study analyzed data from a nationally representative US Sample of females (N=5,637). We examined whether race/ethnicity moderated the associations between early menarche and several adolescent problems by using multiple-group analyses and we examined the degree to which genetic and environmental factors shared by family members account for the associations by comparing sisters and cousins with differing menarcheal ages. Menarcheal age predicted subsequent depressive symptoms, delinquency, and early age at first intercourse in the population. The magnitudes of the associations were similar across all racial/ethnic groups for all outcomes. The within-family associations (i.e., when comparing siblings and cousins with different menarcheal age) were large and statistically significant when predicting early intercourse, but not the other outcomes. The findings suggest that selection or confounding factors account for the associations between menarcheal age and subsequent depressive symptoms and delinquency, whereas the independent association between menarcheal age and early age at first intercourse is consistent with a direct, causal effect.
Bibliography Citation
Vaughan, Erikka B., Carol A. Van Hulle, William H. Beasley, Joseph Lee Rodgers and Brian M. D'Onofrio. "Clarifying the Associations between Age at Menarche and Adolescent Emotional and Behavioral Problems." Journal of Youth and Adolescence 44,4 (April 2015): 922-939.
21. Windle, Michael T.
Substance Use and Abuse Among Adolescent Runaways: A Four-Year Follow-up Study
Journal of Youth and Adolescence 18,4 (August 1989): 331-344.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/f078570076612817/
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Plenum Publishing Corporation
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Dropouts; Gender Differences; Heterogeneity; Illegal Activities; Runaways; Substance Use

Using data from the NLSY, runaway status in early adolescence (ages 14-15) was associated with subsequent (four-years later) substance abuse, alcohol problems, and school dropout status. Three runaway categories were formed-- never runaway, runaway once, and runaway two-or-more times. Overall, the repeat runaways reported engaging in higher levels of substance use and abuse than never and once runaways. However, some degree of gender specificity in the relationships for repeat runaways and substance abuse were found. Female repeat runaways were particularly susceptible to abusing illicit drugs (and not alcohol), whereas male repeat runaways manifested a more generalized susceptibility to abusing alcohol, cigarettes, marijuana, and other illicit drugs. Whereas substance use and abuse was linearly associated with runaway status, both the one-time and repeat runaways manifested equivalent proportions of school dropouts, and at levels far exceeding never runaways. Results are discussed with regard to the heterogeneous developmental pathways leading toward and away from adolescent runaways.
Bibliography Citation
Windle, Michael T. "Substance Use and Abuse Among Adolescent Runaways: A Four-Year Follow-up Study." Journal of Youth and Adolescence 18,4 (August 1989): 331-344.