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Author: Maslowsky, Julie
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. Hendrick, C. Emily
Cance, Jessica Duncan
Maslowsky, Julie
Peer and Individual Risk Factors in Adolescence Explaining the Relationship Between Girls' Pubertal Timing and Teenage Childbearing
Journal of Youth and Adolescence 45,5 (May 2016): 916-927.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10964-016-0413-6/fulltext.html
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Age at Menarche; Childbearing, Adolescent; Modeling, Structural Equation; Peers/Peer influence/Peer relations; Sexual Experiences/Virginity; Substance Use

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Girls with early pubertal timing are at elevated risk for teenage childbearing; however, the modifiable mechanisms driving this relationship are not well understood. The objective of the current study was to determine whether substance use, perceived peer substance use, and older first sexual partners mediate the relationships among girls' pubertal timing, sexual debut, and teenage childbearing. Data are from Waves 1-15 of the female cohort of the National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth 1997 (NLSY97), a nationwide, ongoing cohort study of U.S. men and women born between 1980 and 1984. The analytic sample (n = 2066) was 12-14 years old in 1997 and ethnically diverse (51% white, 27% black, 22% Latina). Using structural equation modeling, we found substance use in early adolescence and perceived peer substance use each partially mediated the relationships among girls' pubertal timing, sexual debut, and teenage childbearing. Our findings suggest early substance use behavior as one modifiable mechanism to be targeted by interventions aimed at preventing teenage childbearing among early developing girls.
Bibliography Citation
Hendrick, C. Emily, Jessica Duncan Cance and Julie Maslowsky. "Peer and Individual Risk Factors in Adolescence Explaining the Relationship Between Girls' Pubertal Timing and Teenage Childbearing." Journal of Youth and Adolescence 45,5 (May 2016): 916-927.
2. Hendrick, C. Emily
Maslowsky, Julie
Teen Mothers' Educational Attainment and Their Children's Risk for Teenage Childbearing
Developmental Psychology 55,6 (June 2019): 1259-1273.
Also: https://psycnet.apa.org/fulltext/2019-10559-001.html
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: American Psychological Association (APA)
Keyword(s): Age at First Birth; Childbearing, Adolescent; Educational Attainment; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Modeling, Structural Equation; Mothers, Adolescent; Teenagers

The children of teen mothers are at elevated risk for becoming teen parents themselves. The current study aimed to identify how levels of mothers' education were associated with risk of teenage childbearing for children of teen versus nonteen mothers. Through structural equation modeling, we tested whether children's environmental and personal characteristics in adolescence and subsequent sexual risk behaviors mediated the relationship between their mothers' educational attainment and their risk for teenage childbearing. With multiple-group models, we assessed whether the associations of maternal educational attainment with children's outcomes were similar for the children of teen and nonteen mothers. The sample (N = 1,817) contained linked data from female National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1979 (NLSY79) participants and their first-born child (son or daughter) from the NLSY79 Children and Young Adults. The mediating pathways linking higher levels of maternal education to lower risk for teenage childbearing, and magnitudes of the associations, were mostly similar for children of teen and nonteen mothers. However, nonteen mothers experienced greater associations of their high school diploma attainment (vs. no degree) with some of their children's outcomes. Also, the association of earning a high school diploma (vs. a GED) with household incomes was greater for nonteen mothers; there was no significant difference between degree types for teen mothers. Findings provide support for teen mother secondary school support programming, but point to a need for further research regarding the long-term behavioral and social outcomes associated with the high school equivalency certificate for teen mothers and their children. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved)
Bibliography Citation
Hendrick, C. Emily and Julie Maslowsky. "Teen Mothers' Educational Attainment and Their Children's Risk for Teenage Childbearing." Developmental Psychology 55,6 (June 2019): 1259-1273.
3. Maslowsky, Julie
Hendrick, C. Emily
Stritzel, Haley
Mechanisms Linking Teenage Mothers' Educational Attainment with Self-reported Health at Age 50
BMC Women's Health 21 (2021): 15.
Also: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1186/s12905-020-01150-y
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Childbearing, Adolescent; Educational Attainment; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Background: Early childbearing is associated with adverse health and well-being throughout the life course for women in the United States. As education continues to be a modifiable social determinant of health after a young woman gives birth, the association of increased educational attainment with long-term health for women who begin childbearing as teenagers is worthy of investigation.

Methods: Data are from 301 mothers in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 who gave birth prior to age 19. We estimated path models to assess women's incomes, partner characteristics, and health behaviors at age 40 as mediators of the relationship between their educational attainment and self-rated general health at age 50.

Results: After accounting for observed background factors that select women into early childbearing and lower educational attainment, higher levels of education (high school diploma and GED attainment vs. no degree) were indirectly associated with higher self-rated health at age 50 via higher participant income at age 40.

Bibliography Citation
Maslowsky, Julie, C. Emily Hendrick and Haley Stritzel. "Mechanisms Linking Teenage Mothers' Educational Attainment with Self-reported Health at Age 50." BMC Women's Health 21 (2021): 15.