Search Results

Author: Shandra, Carrie L.
Resulting in 12 citations.
1. Hogan, Dennis P.
Sandefur, Gary D.
Shandra, Carrie L.
Educational Attainment Process among Adolescents with Disabilities and Children of Parents with Disabilities
Presented: New York, NY, Population Association of America Annual Meetings, March 29-31, 2007.
Also: http://paa2007.princeton.edu/abstractViewer.aspx?submissionId=70969
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Disability; Educational Attainment; Human Capital

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Educational attainment marks a vital step in the overall transition to adulthood, especially for members of at-risk populations. Some adolescents utilize education to substantially enhance their human capital while others make poor decisions or face circumstances that result in too little schooling. This paper expands on previous research by examining two groups of adolescents previously ignored in research on educational attainment — those with disabilities and those who are children of parents with disabilities. Our results examine the effect of disability on parental and youth college expectations in 1997 as well as youth high school completion and college enrollment in 2003. We find that parental and youth educational expectations strongly predict high school completion and college enrollment and that educational attainment is not equal for children with and without disabilities. Most interestingly, we find a large disparity between parental and youth educational expectations for children with disabilities net of educational performance.
Bibliography Citation
Hogan, Dennis P., Gary D. Sandefur and Carrie L. Shandra. "Educational Attainment Process among Adolescents with Disabilities and Children of Parents with Disabilities." Presented: New York, NY, Population Association of America Annual Meetings, March 29-31, 2007.
2. Hogan, Dennis P.
Shandra, Carrie L.
Msall, Michael E.
Family Developmental Risk Factors Among Adolescents With Disabilities and Children of Parents with Disabilities
Journal of Adolescence 30,6 (December 2007): 1001-1019.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0140197107000127
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Academic Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Disability; Family Influences; Family Studies; Gender; Home Environment; Household Structure; Learning Motivation; Parental Influences

This paper investigates how the learning environments and family dynamics differ if households have a child with a disability or a parent with a disability. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997, results indicate that children with disabilities experience similar learning environments as other children, but have somewhat weaker relationships with their parents. In two-parent families, maternal disability lowers parents' school involvement and is associated with a less enriching home environment. Paternal disability reduces maternal monitoring and positive family activities possibly because mothers divert care-giving resources from their children to their male partners. Children in mother-headed households experience learning environments and family dynamics that are similar regardless of their own disability status or that of their mothers, but these outcomes are markedly inferior to those of children growing up in two-parent households. Future research on adolescent development should consider the disability status of children and parents, with particular attention to patterns of gendered care-giving in American families. [Copyright 2007 Elsevier]

Copyright of Journal of Adolescence is the property of Academic Press Inc. and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts)

Bibliography Citation
Hogan, Dennis P., Carrie L. Shandra and Michael E. Msall. "Family Developmental Risk Factors Among Adolescents With Disabilities and Children of Parents with Disabilities." Journal of Adolescence 30,6 (December 2007): 1001-1019.
3. Shandra, Carrie L.
Job Characteristics and Job Retention of Young Workers With Disabilities
Presented: Austin TX, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2019
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Disabled Workers; Job Characteristics; Work Histories

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

People with disabilities experience lower labor force participation than people without disabilities in the US. Despite the focus on work promotion among this population, less is known about factors increasing job retention. This study utilizes longitudinal employment histories from NLSY97 to evaluate: How job characteristics differ by adolescent disability status, what job characteristics associate with the hazard of separation, and if the characteristics associated with the hazard of separation differ by adolescent disability status. Young workers with adolescent disabilities have a higher baseline hazard of separation than workers without disabilities. These results persist for involuntary separations (serious disability) and voluntary health-related separations (mild or serious disability), net of job characteristics. Employment benefits--medical, scheduling, leave, retirement--negatively associate with the hazard of separation for workers with disabilities. However, these effects persist for all workers, whereas job satisfaction, job sector, and work hours further condition the hazard of separation among workers with disabilities.
Bibliography Citation
Shandra, Carrie L. "Job Characteristics and Job Retention of Young Workers With Disabilities." Presented: Austin TX, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2019.
4. Shandra, Carrie L.
Life-Course Transitions Among Adolescents With and Without Disabilities
International Journal of Sociology 41,1 (Spring 2011): 67-86.
Also: http://mesharpe.metapress.com/app/home/contribution.asp?referrer=parent&backto=issue,5,6;journal,2,30;linkingpublicationresults,1:110910,1
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: M.E. Sharpe, Inc.
Keyword(s): Disability; Education; Educational Outcomes; Employment; Life Course; Parenthood; Pregnancy and Pregnancy Outcomes; Transition, Adulthood

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Research on adolescents suggests that young people are able to form reasonable expectations about future life-course transitions-and that these expectations are predictive of future outcomes. However, less is known about how these expectations might vary for adolescents with disabilities, who might face additional challenges when transitioning to adulthood. The present study addresses this gap in the literature by using nationally representative data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY97) to suggest that young people's expectations about pregnancy, parenthood, education, and employment do vary according to disability status. Furthermore, disability status conditions the relationship between these expectations and their future outcomes. In general, adolescents with disabilities are more proficient in the prediction of educational outcomes than employment or pregnancy outcomes. However, their expectations about education are significantly lower-and expectations about teenage parenthood much higher-than those of adolescents without disabilities. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

Copyright of International Journal of Sociology is the property of M.E. Sharpe Inc. and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)

Bibliography Citation
Shandra, Carrie L. "Life-Course Transitions Among Adolescents With and Without Disabilities." International Journal of Sociology 41,1 (Spring 2011): 67-86.
5. Shandra, Carrie L.
Chowdhury, Afra R.
The First Sexual Experience Among Adolescent Girls With and Without Disabilities
Journal of Youth and Adolescence 41,4 (April 2012): 515-532.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/k6347173572k2635/
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Age at First Intercourse; Contraception; Disability; Life Course; Pregnancy and Pregnancy Outcomes

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

First sexual intercourse is an important experience in the young adult life course. While previous research has examined racial, gender, and socioeconomic differences in the characteristics of first sexual intercourse, less is known about differences by disability status. Using a racially diverse (27% Black, 20% Hispanic, and 53% non-Hispanic white) sample of 2,729 adolescent girls aged 12-24 at first sexual intercourse from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997, this article examines the association between disability and type of first sexual relationship, degree of discussion about birth control, and pregnancy wantedness. Regression analyses indicate that girls with mild or learning or emotional disabilities experience first sexual intercourse in different types of relationships than girls without disabilities. Adolescents with learning or emotional conditions have greater levels of discussion about birth control with their first sexual partners than those without disabilities. In addition, among those who do not use birth control at first sexual intercourse, girls with multiple or seriously limiting conditions are more likely to want a pregnancy-versus not want a pregnancy-at first sexual intercourse. Findings indicate that disability status is important to consider when examining adolescent sexuality; however, not all youth with disabilities have equal experiences.
Bibliography Citation
Shandra, Carrie L. and Afra R. Chowdhury. "The First Sexual Experience Among Adolescent Girls With and Without Disabilities." Journal of Youth and Adolescence 41,4 (April 2012): 515-532.
6. Shandra, Carrie L.
Hogan, Dennis P.
Delinquency Among Adolescents with Disabilities
Child Indicators Research 5,4 (December 2012): 771-788.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs12187-012-9135-9
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Arrests; Crime; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Disability; Health, Chronic Conditions; Health, Mental; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study expands upon previous research by utilizing nationally representative data and multivariate analyses to examine the relationship between an adolescent's disability status and their likelihood of engaging in a spectrum of delinquent behaviors through age 16. Logistic regression models of 7,232 adolescents from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 are used to investigate the association between the presence of a learning disability or emotional condition, chronic health condition, sensory condition, physical disability, or multiple conditions and ten delinquent acts, including violence-related delinquency, property crimes, drug offenses, and arrest. Additional analyses explore differences in delinquency prevalence by more specific types of limiting conditions. Results indicate that adolescents with learning disabilities or emotional conditions are particularly at risk of committing delinquent acts. Findings suggest that disability status is important to consider when examining adolescent delinquency; however, not all youth with disabilities have equal experiences.
Bibliography Citation
Shandra, Carrie L. and Dennis P. Hogan. "Delinquency Among Adolescents with Disabilities ." Child Indicators Research 5,4 (December 2012): 771-788.
7. Shandra, Carrie L.
Hogan, Dennis P.
Educational Attainment Process Among Adolescents with Disabilities and Children of Parents with Disabilities
International Journal of Disability, Development and Education 56,4 (December 2009): 363-379.
Also: http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/content~db=all~content=a916860946
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Routledge ==> Taylor & Francis (1998)
Keyword(s): Disability; Educational Aspirations/Expectations; Educational Attainment; High School Completion/Graduates; High School Diploma; School Performance

This article uses data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 (NLSY97) to examine the relationship between disability, parental and youth university expectations in 1997, and youth high school completion and university enrolment by 2003. Results indicate that educational attainment is not equal for young adults with and without disabilities in the United States. Parents--but not adolescents--are likely to reduce their educational expectations when adolescents have a mild or serious disability, net of school performance. These parental--but not adolescent--expectations are significantly associated with high school completion. Finally, even after controlling for educational expectations and school performance, youth with serious disabilities are much less likely to graduate from high school than youth without disabilities. Despite the considerable strides made in the implementation of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, students with disabilities are not achieving educational parity in graded schooling. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Shandra, Carrie L. and Dennis P. Hogan. "Educational Attainment Process Among Adolescents with Disabilities and Children of Parents with Disabilities." International Journal of Disability, Development and Education 56,4 (December 2009): 363-379.
8. Shandra, Carrie L.
Hogan, Dennis P.
School-to-Work Initiatives and the Early Employment of Young Adults with Disabilities
Presented: Boston MA, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, July 2008
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Benefits, Disability; Benefits, Fringe; Disability; Disabled Workers; Employment, In-School; Employment, Youth; Transition, School to Work; Vocational Education; Vocational Guidance

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The transition from school to work is a critical juncture in the life course of all adolescents. However, this transition is particularly critical for young persons with disabilities – a disproportionate percentage of whom leave high school and neither work nor continue their education. This study utilizes data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 (NLSY97) to consider how participation in various school-based and work-based programs affects the post-high school employment of young persons with disabilities. Longitudinal analyses indicate that school-based programs are associated with many positive employment outcomes while work-based programs are related to employer-offered health insurance and paid sick days. Results suggest that school-to-work programs are effective in facilitating vocational success for this population; however, efficacy varies by program type and employment outcome.
Bibliography Citation
Shandra, Carrie L. and Dennis P. Hogan. "School-to-Work Initiatives and the Early Employment of Young Adults with Disabilities." Presented: Boston MA, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, July 2008.
9. Shandra, Carrie L.
Hogan, Dennis P.
School-To-Work Program Participation and the Post-High School Employment of Young Adults with Disabilities
Journal of Vocational Rehabilitation 29,2 (January 2008): 117-130.
Also: http://iospress.metapress.com/content/p1w5n64231776046/?p=05209d2dc8af4b8499b8a73279550ade&pi=9
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: IOS Press
Keyword(s): Benefits, Disability; Benefits, Fringe; Disabled Workers; Employment, In-School; Employment, Youth; Probability judgments (also see Risk Perception); Transition, School to Work; Vocational Education; Vocational Guidance

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Previous research on the education-to-employment transition for students with disabilities has suggested that participation in school-to-work programs is positively associated with post-high school success. This article utilizes data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 (NLSY97) to extend these findings in several ways. First, we assess the efficacy of specific types of school-based and work-based initiatives, including job shadowing, mentoring, cooperative education, school-sponsored enterprise, technical preparation, internships, and career major. Next, we extend the usual focus on the employment outcomes of work status and financial compensation to consider job-specific information on the receipt of fringe benefits. Overall, results from longitudinal multivariate analyses suggest that transition initiatives are effective in facilitating vocational success for this population; however, different aspects of school-to-work programs are beneficial for different aspects of employment. School-based programs are positively associated with stable employment and full-time work while work-based programs most consistently increase the likelihood that youth with disabilities will be employed in jobs that provide fringe benefits. Analyses also indicate that - once individuals with disabilities are stably employed - they can be employed in "good" jobs that provide employee benefits.
Bibliography Citation
Shandra, Carrie L. and Dennis P. Hogan. "School-To-Work Program Participation and the Post-High School Employment of Young Adults with Disabilities ." Journal of Vocational Rehabilitation 29,2 (January 2008): 117-130.
10. Shandra, Carrie L.
Hogan, Dennis P.
Chowdhury, Afra R.
Differences in Young Women's First Sexual Experience by Disability Status
Presented: Dallas, TX, Population Association of America Meetings, April 2010
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Contraception; Disability; Family Planning; Sexual Experiences/Virginity

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

First intercourse is an important experience in the young adult life course. While previous research has examined racial, sex, and socioeconomic differences in the characteristics of first sex, less is known about differences by disability status. Using a sample of women from the NLSY97, this paper examines the association between disability and type of first sexual relationship, degree of discussion about birth control, use of birth control, and--among those who do not contracept--pregnancy wantedness. Regression analyses indicate that women with disabilities experience first intercourse in different types of relationships than women without disabilities. While we find no differences in discussion about or use of birth control by disability status, women with disabilities who do not contracept are more likely to want a pregnancy than women without disabilities. Results suggest family planning assistance might be most beneficial for young women with disabilities if provided before they become sexually active.
Bibliography Citation
Shandra, Carrie L., Dennis P. Hogan and Afra R. Chowdhury. "Differences in Young Women's First Sexual Experience by Disability Status." Presented: Dallas, TX, Population Association of America Meetings, April 2010.
11. Shandra, Carrie L.
Hogan, Dennis P.
Spearin, Carrie E.
Parenting a Child with a Disability: An Examination of Resident and Non-Resident Fathers
Journal of Population Research 25,3 (October 2008): 357-377
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Children; Disability; Fathers and Children; Fathers, Biological; Fathers, Presence

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Children with disabilities often require, more extensive family involvement and greater paternal support than other children. Yet these children are the children least likely to live with their fathers. This paper uses data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 from the United States to examine the association between child disability and resident and non-resident biological fathers' supportiveness, relationship, and monitoring of their children. Regression analyses indicate significant challenges for all fathers of children with disabilities. Children of resident fathers report more positive interactions than children of non-resident fathers. However, earlier co-residence and more frequent contact significantly improve the quality, of father-youth relationships among men who do not live with their children.
Bibliography Citation
Shandra, Carrie L., Dennis P. Hogan and Carrie E. Spearin. "Parenting a Child with a Disability: An Examination of Resident and Non-Resident Fathers." Journal of Population Research 25,3 (October 2008): 357-377.
12. Shandra, Carrie L.
Shameem, Masra
Ghori, Sadaf J.
Disability and the Context of Boys' First Sexual Intercourse
Journal of Adolescent Health 58,3 (March 2016): 302-309.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1054139X15004085
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Adolescent Sexual Activity; Contraception; Disability; Health, Chronic Conditions; Male Sample; Sexual Experiences/Virginity

The context in which first sexual intercourse takes place has lasting implications for subsequent sexual behavior. This study examines how adolescent disability associates with boys' age of sexual debut, relationship at first sexual intercourse, degree of discussion about birth control before first sexual intercourse, and contraceptive use at first sexual intercourse.
Bibliography Citation
Shandra, Carrie L., Masra Shameem and Sadaf J. Ghori. "Disability and the Context of Boys' First Sexual Intercourse." Journal of Adolescent Health 58,3 (March 2016): 302-309.