Search Results

Source: American Educational Research Association
Resulting in 24 citations.
1. Chen, Jen-Hao
Health and the Development of Academic and Behavioral Skills in Early Childhood
Presented: New Orleans LA, American Educational Research Association (AERA) meeting, April 2011
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: American Educational Research Association
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Birthweight; CESD (Depression Scale); Early Childhood Longitudinal Study (ECLS-B, ECLS-K); Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Modeling, Fixed Effects; Pre/post Natal Behavior; Pre/post Natal Health Care; Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES) (see Self-Esteem); Rotter Scale (see Locus of Control); Siblings; Sociability/Socialization/Social Interaction; Temperament

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Bibliography Citation
Chen, Jen-Hao. "Health and the Development of Academic and Behavioral Skills in Early Childhood." Presented: New Orleans LA, American Educational Research Association (AERA) meeting, April 2011.
2. Ciocca, Christina
Postsecondary Curricular Trajectories: Trends, Outcomes, and New Directions
Presented: Washington DC, American Educational Research Association (AERA) Annual Meeting, April 2016
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: American Educational Research Association
Keyword(s): College Degree; College Major/Field of Study/Courses; Labor Market Outcomes

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper draws on recently released postsecondary transcript data from the 1997 National Longitudinal Study of Youth (NLSY) to make three central contributions to the literature on higher education experiences and labor market outcomes. First, it provides a descriptive characterization of students' average course-taking patterns within two- and four-year colleges in the United States. Second, it introduces more granular measures of curriculum, curricular diversity and curricular intensity. And third, it links these more granular measures with labor market outcomes. Early results indicate that, after accounting for level and quality of postsecondary institution, field of academic concentration and curricular intensity matter more for labor market returns than curricular diversity one year following degree completion.

Also presented at Seattle WA, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2016.

Bibliography Citation
Ciocca, Christina. "Postsecondary Curricular Trajectories: Trends, Outcomes, and New Directions." Presented: Washington DC, American Educational Research Association (AERA) Annual Meeting, April 2016.
3. Cohen, Alison K.
Smith, Louisa H.
Ream, Robert K.
Glymour, M. Maria
Yen, Irene H.
Educational Attainment Trajectories of U.S. Adults: Sociodemographic Differences in When People Finish Their Schooling
Presented: San Antonio TX, American Educational Research Association Annual Meeting, April-May 2017
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Educational Research Association
Keyword(s): Educational Attainment; Ethnic Differences; Household Influences; Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study describes lifetime educational trajectories of members of the U.S. National Longitudinal Survey of Youth's 1979 cohort and explores differences in trajectories by race/ethnicity, sex, household circumstances, and other sociodemographic characteristics. We considered participants to have continued their education past a given age if at any time after that age their reported number of years of education increased, they reported earning a higher degree, or they were enrolled in high school or college. Two out of five people had not completed their education by age 25; one in eight had not completed by age 40. At every age after 18, Asians and whites had more education than African-Americans/blacks and Hispanics/Latinos. Causes and implications for these different trajectories are discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Cohen, Alison K., Louisa H. Smith, Robert K. Ream, M. Maria Glymour and Irene H. Yen. "Educational Attainment Trajectories of U.S. Adults: Sociodemographic Differences in When People Finish Their Schooling." Presented: San Antonio TX, American Educational Research Association Annual Meeting, April-May 2017.
4. Deluca, Stefanie
Plank, Stephen B.
Estacion, Angela
Wayman, Jeffrey
Vocational Education Today: Participation Rates, Student Composition, and Early Outcomes of the NLSY97
Presented: San Diego, CA, American Educational Research Association Annual Meeting, 2004
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: American Educational Research Association
Keyword(s): College Education; Event History; High School Curriculum; High School Dropouts; Transition, School to Work; Vocational Education

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

In contrast to the visible efforts in American schools to increase academic standards are the less obvious efforts to improve the academic preparation and outcomes for non-college bound students. Between 1990-1998, several pieces of legislation were passed that directly affected the high school experience of vocational students. Using four rounds of data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997, we examine vocational education in U.S. high schools. Specifically, we examine course-taking in career and technical education (CTE), participation in particular school-to-work programs (e.g., job shadowing, mentoring, and cooperative education), and the integration of these courses with academic courses. We focus upon whether opportunities and participation rates changed during the 1990s, perhaps as a result of federal legislation. Further, we give attention to the CTE participation rates and effects of participation for females, minorities and other subgroups. Descriptive statistics, regression models, and event history analysis are employed to study effects on high school grades, on-time progress toward graduation, high school dropout, and expectations about the future.
Bibliography Citation
Deluca, Stefanie, Stephen B. Plank, Angela Estacion and Jeffrey Wayman. "Vocational Education Today: Participation Rates, Student Composition, and Early Outcomes of the NLSY97." Presented: San Diego, CA, American Educational Research Association Annual Meeting, 2004.
5. Dexter, Emily R.
Development of Reading Skills in the U.S.: A Multi-level Growth Analysis Exploring Differences by Race/Ethnicity
Presented: New Orleans, LA, American Educational Research Association (AERA) Annual Meetings, April 2002.
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: American Educational Research Association
Keyword(s): Family Studies; Literacy; Modeling, Growth Curve/Latent Trajectory Analysis; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper argues that national reading policies are often made in response to cross-sectional surveys; as a result, policies do not adequately relate to developmental research on reading and literacy. In addition, survey analyses are most often conducted with individual children rather than with groups or families of children, perpetuating a view of the child as isolated from family or community contexts. Analyses of longitudinal surveys, however, have the potential to bring an authentically developmental perspective to policy debates about U.S. children's reading abilities. In addition analytic techniques that nest the child within larger contexts can link survey research to research on contexts of development. As an example, the results of a growth analysis of reading data from the Children of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (C-NLSY) are presented; in this analysis children are grouped within families. In addition, separate comparative analyses are conducted for White, African American, and Latino children. The research questions are: 1) What are the average trajectories in reading development for U.S. children? 2) How much variation is there across families? Is there variation within families? 3) Are there differences in the trajectories of White, African American, and Latino children? Discussion is invited around the question of how the findings from this and other studies of literacy development can better inform educational policy.
Bibliography Citation
Dexter, Emily R. "Development of Reading Skills in the U.S.: A Multi-level Growth Analysis Exploring Differences by Race/Ethnicity." Presented: New Orleans, LA, American Educational Research Association (AERA) Annual Meetings, April 2002..
6. Dexter, Emily R.
Home Literacy Supports and Children's Reading Trajectories
Presented: San Diego, CA, American Educational Research Association Meeting, April 2004
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: American Educational Research Association
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Children, Academic Development; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Literacy; Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness; Parenting Skills/Styles; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper reports on an analysis of reading data from the Children of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (C-NLSY). The hypothesis is tested that mother-child interactions during the preschool and school years, the frequency with which the mother reads to the child during the preschool years, and the frequency of family meals and enrichment opportunities during the school years predict children's reading trajectories. Maternal reading frequency and mother-child interactions are found to be associated with enhanced reading ability throughout the school years, controlling for maternal schooling, maternal literacy, and income, and the taxonomy of models suggests that these variables may explain some of the effects of maternal schooling and income on children's reading development.
Bibliography Citation
Dexter, Emily R. "Home Literacy Supports and Children's Reading Trajectories." Presented: San Diego, CA, American Educational Research Association Meeting, April 2004.
7. Dexter, Emily R.
Maternal Supports for Children's Literacy Development: Changes as Children Age and Association with Maternal Literacy, Education, Income, and Race/Ethnicity
Presented: New Orleans, LA, American Educational Research Association Annual Meetings, April 2002.
Also: http://tigersystem.net/aera2002/viewproposaltext.asp?propID=7533
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: American Educational Research Association
Keyword(s): Children, Academic Development; Family Income; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Mothers, Behavior; Mothers, Education; Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness; Preschool Children; Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper presents a developmental study of maternal behaviors supporting children's school-based literacy development from ages 3 to 15. Previous studies focusing on children's literacy development have described differences in maternal speech to children (Heath, 1982; Reese, 1995; Snow and Kurland, 1995); differences in bookreading style (DeTemple and Snow, 1996; Pellegrini and Galda, 1998); differences in the quality of mealtime conversation (Blum-Kulka; Beals, 1991; Dickinson and Tabors, 1991); and differing opportunities for enrichment outside of school (Anderson et al., 1988; Amota and Ochiltree, 1986; Griswold, 1986; Snow et al., 1991). Only a few of these studies have been longitudinal, and most have been conducted with small local samples. Thus they do not yield a developmental picture of how parental behavior changes with the growth of the child, nor can they be generalized to the larger population. The current study attempts to address these two gaps by using growth-modeling statistics (Willett, 1994) to analyze data from a national survey, the Children of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. The following research questions are addressed: 1) How do maternal behaviors promoting literacy development change as the child matures from age 3 to 15? 2) How much variation is there amongst mothers in their behaviors? 3) To what extent is this variation associated with maternal literacy, schooling, and income? And 4) Are there differences between white, African-American, and Latina mothers, controlling for other maternal predictors? At the conclusion of the session the audience will have the opportunity to discuss the study and its results and to make suggestions for future research
Bibliography Citation
Dexter, Emily R. "Maternal Supports for Children's Literacy Development: Changes as Children Age and Association with Maternal Literacy, Education, Income, and Race/Ethnicity." Presented: New Orleans, LA, American Educational Research Association Annual Meetings, April 2002.
8. Dufur, Mikaela J.
Rowley, Kristie J.
Pribesh, Shana
Jarvis, Jonathan
Yue, Yuanyuan
Otero, Carolina
Alexander, Alyssa J.
Ferguson, Amanda
Enrollment in Two- and Four-Year Colleges: The Role of Family Structures and Transitions
Presented: San Antonio TX, American Educational Research Association Annual Meeting, April-May 2017
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: American Educational Research Association
Keyword(s): College Enrollment; Family Income; Family Structure; Financial Assistance; Parents, Single; Post-Secondary Transcripts

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Children in disrupted families are less likely to apply to, be accepted to, or attend four-year colleges and universities than are their peers from stable, two-parent families. We extend exploration into why this may occur to youths' decisions to attend two- or four-year schools. To test this relationship, we use new data from the National Longitudinal Study of Youth-1997 Cohort Post-Secondary Transcript Study (NLSY97-PTS). Logistic regression models suggest that financial resources--both income and college support--explain enrollment differences between single mother families and two-biological-parent families. Selectivity effects explain differences for youth living only with fathers or with neither biological parent. Differences for youth with social fathers persist in our models.
Bibliography Citation
Dufur, Mikaela J., Kristie J. Rowley, Shana Pribesh, Jonathan Jarvis, Yuanyuan Yue, Carolina Otero, Alyssa J. Alexander and Amanda Ferguson. "Enrollment in Two- and Four-Year Colleges: The Role of Family Structures and Transitions." Presented: San Antonio TX, American Educational Research Association Annual Meeting, April-May 2017.
9. Ellis, Francis Patrick
Pham, Hoang
Psychological Well-Being in Development: Interdisciplinary Analysis of Race, Gender, and Socioeconomic Status
Presented: Philadelphia PA, American Educational Research Association (AERA) Annual Meeting, April 2014
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: American Educational Research Association
Keyword(s): Gender Differences; Modeling, Structural Equation; Racial Differences; Socioeconomic Status (SES); Well-Being

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper provides an interdisciplinary analysis of characteristic effects on adolescent psychological well-being. The author hypothesizes that youth whom identity with multiple social status characteristics that have been historically disenfranchised, continue to experience disadvantages across these statuses. Prior research suggests that frameworks such as stress-based theories and social evaluation theories provide insight into the implications of social status characteristics. Data was collected from the National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth (NLSY), by the Center for Human Resource Research at The Ohio State University. The sample for this study consisted of 1136 youth from three racial/ethic groups. A quantitative methodological approach known as latent growth curve models was incorporated to analyze the data using SEM (Structural Equation Modeling).
Bibliography Citation
Ellis, Francis Patrick and Hoang Pham. "Psychological Well-Being in Development: Interdisciplinary Analysis of Race, Gender, and Socioeconomic Status." Presented: Philadelphia PA, American Educational Research Association (AERA) Annual Meeting, April 2014.
10. Gasper, Joseph Michael
Deluca, Stefanie
Estacion, Angela
Switching High Schools: Cause of Dropping Out or Symptom of Disengagement?
Presented: Denver, CO, American Educational Research Association, May 3, 2010.
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: American Educational Research Association
Keyword(s): Behavioral Differences; Educational Outcomes; High School; High School Dropouts; Propensity Scores

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Numerous studies demonstrate that youth who switch schools for reasons other than grade promotion are more likely to demonstrate a wide array of negative behavioral and educational outcomes, including dropping out of high school. However, whether switching schools puts youth at risk for dropping out of high school is uncertain, since youth who switch schools are similar to high school dropouts in terms of their levels of prior school achievement and engagement, which suggests that switching schools may be caused by the same long-term developmental process of disengagement that leads to dropping out. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 (NLSY97), this study uses propensity score matching techniques to pair youth who switched high schools with similar youth who stayed in the same high school. We find that while over half the association between switching high schools on dropout can be explained by observed characteristics prior to 9th grade, switching high schools still has an effect on dropout. Moreover, this effect seems to vary, depending on a youth's propensity for switching high schools. Suggestions for future research are discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Gasper, Joseph Michael, Stefanie Deluca and Angela Estacion. "Switching High Schools: Cause of Dropping Out or Symptom of Disengagement?" Presented: Denver, CO, American Educational Research Association, May 3, 2010.
11. Giancola, Susan P.
Adolescent Behavior Problems: Peer Pressure "Is" All It Is Cracked Up To Be
Presented: New Orleans, LA, American Educational Research Association Annual Conference, April 2000.
Also: http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICDocs/data/ericdocs2sql/content_storage_01/0000019b/80/16/bc/0d.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Educational Research Association
Keyword(s): Behavioral Problems; High School; Longitudinal Surveys; Peers/Peer influence/Peer relations; Schooling; Substance Use

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Student misbehavior is a problem affecting schools across the nation. Many school districts are searching for programs to remediate and reform problematic behavior in students. In order to develop successful programs, it is important first to understand what constitutes student misbehavior and second to determine reasons for students' behavior. The subjects for this study are participants in the National Longitudinal Study of 1988. Factors explaining students' behavior were looked at in 1988, 1990, and 1992, thus following them from 8th grade through their senior year. The data from this study confirms the existence of a common misbehavior construct comprised of both misbehavior and substance abuse items. Findings also support the ecological theory of behavior, where discipline problems are a result of a complex interaction of influences and thus should be treated within the system, rather than individually. The influence of an adolescent's peer group was found to explain student behavior throughout the high school years better than any other variable. Having academically-oriented friends seemed to encourage students to behave well and to help them resist drugs and alcohol. Negative peer influence seemed to greatly increase a student's risk for behavior problems and substance abuse. (Contains 12 tables and 24 references.) (JDM)
Bibliography Citation
Giancola, Susan P. "Adolescent Behavior Problems: Peer Pressure "Is" All It Is Cracked Up To Be." Presented: New Orleans, LA, American Educational Research Association Annual Conference, April 2000.
12. Grasso, John T.
On the Declining Labor Market Value of Schooling
Presented: New York, NY, American Educational Research Association Meetings, 1977
Cohort(s): Young Men
Publisher: American Educational Research Association
Keyword(s): College Graduates; Current Population Survey (CPS) / CPS-Fertility Supplement; Earnings; Educational Returns; Employment; High School Completion/Graduates; Schooling; Unemployment

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper reviews existing work and presents new analyses on changes in the labor market effects of higher education. Attention was devoted principally to the work of Margaret Gordon and Richard Freeman in order to gain perspective on recent changes in college-labor market effects. Reanalyses of published data from the Current Population Reports as well as analysis of microdata from the NLS lead to new and consistent findings. Results indicate: (1) declines in relative earnings among new labor market entrants as a group; and (2) declines in relative earnings among older and more experienced college graduates. Results do not support the hypothesis that a recent oversupply of college graduates has led to declines in relative earnings among new college graduates.
Bibliography Citation
Grasso, John T. "On the Declining Labor Market Value of Schooling." Presented: New York, NY, American Educational Research Association Meetings, 1977.
13. Grasso, John T.
Vocational Education, Training, and Job Skills for Youth
Presented: San Francisco, CA, American Educational Research Association Meetings, 1976
Cohort(s): Young Men
Publisher: American Educational Research Association
Keyword(s): Career Patterns; Duncan Index; Earnings; High School Curriculum; Job Skills; Job Training; Unemployment; Vocational Education

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This is a report of research concerning the role of high school education in preparing youth for the world of work. Its undertaking is related to many events in the past fifteen years: the persistence of high rates of youth unemployment, even during relatively good economic times; the passage of major legislation at the national level on vocational education and training; and, of course, the inception of "career education." The relevance of findings of much existing research to policy questions is sharply circumscribed by limitations in the design, data and methodology of such studies. One example of a problem area involves comparing groups of youth with respect to earnings to determine the "payoff" to "investment" in vocational education. Not only can an emphasis on earnings lead to disregard for other important questions (and it appears that it has) but there are literally a host of complicating factors relevant to appraising results based on the first year's earnings of young persons. Using data from a national sample of youth, the analysis focuses on graduates of various high school curricula who did not continue their education with college. Specifically, data are examined with respect to: (1) their desires for additional training after having gained work experience; (2) the kinds of further training desired; (3) the actual acquisition of such training; and (4) the kinds of first jobs as well as subsequent jobs which were obtained by the youth. In the latter case, variables relating to jobs are based on several ratings of occupations.
Bibliography Citation
Grasso, John T. "Vocational Education, Training, and Job Skills for Youth." Presented: San Francisco, CA, American Educational Research Association Meetings, 1976.
14. Han, Hyojung
Rojewski, Jay W.
Longitudinal Latent Class Analysis of College-Educated Women's Economic Attainment Patterns During Mid-Career
Presented: San Antonio TX, American Educational Research Association Annual Meeting, April-May 2017
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Educational Research Association
Keyword(s): Career Patterns; College Education; Income; Job Satisfaction; Women

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The present study used latent profile analysis to analyze U.S. college-educated women's mid-career development by classifying their economic attainment (annual income) patterns. Participants were selected from a nationally representative database, the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979. The study identified five latent classes of college-educated women; the classes were referred to as sustained-growth women, steady-decline-end-rebound women, low-stagnant-growth women, late-leave-end-rebound women, and early-leave-mid-rebound women. The majority of participants belonged to sustained-growth women, whose economic attainment consistently increased during their mid-career stage. Job satisfaction and family characteristics of the five economic attainment classes were then examined. The study found no particular pattern in job satisfaction that discriminates individual classes. The most family-oriented class of the five appeared to be sustained-growth women.
Bibliography Citation
Han, Hyojung and Jay W. Rojewski. "Longitudinal Latent Class Analysis of College-Educated Women's Economic Attainment Patterns During Mid-Career." Presented: San Antonio TX, American Educational Research Association Annual Meeting, April-May 2017.
15. Markowitz, Anna J.
Associations Among No Child Left Behind, School Engagement, and Academic Outcomes
Presented: Washington DC, American Educational Research Association (AERA) Annual Meeting, April 2016
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: American Educational Research Association
Keyword(s): Achievement; Children, Academic Development; Children, Well-Being; Legislation

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Research increasingly suggests that school engagement is an important contributor to students' success in school and long-term wellbeing. Unfortunately, researchers have also argued that the strict accountability system mandated by the federal education policy No Child Left Behind (NCLB) have reduced schools' ability to engage with and educate students effectively. Because NCLB is a federal policy, few studies have been able to explore the effects of NCLB on these outcomes directly. Using a counterfactual interrupted time series design and the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth this study assesses whether NCLB influenced students' engagement with school and academic growth. Evidence suggests that NCLB improved mathematics, but not reading, achievement. Moreover, there is also evidence that NCLB reduces emotional engagement with school.
Bibliography Citation
Markowitz, Anna J. "Associations Among No Child Left Behind, School Engagement, and Academic Outcomes." Presented: Washington DC, American Educational Research Association (AERA) Annual Meeting, April 2016.
16. Monaghan, David B.
Adult Undergraduates and Bachelor's Degree Attainment: How Common Is Completion? And Who Completes?
Presented: Washington DC, American Educational Research Association (AERA) Annual Meeting, April 2016
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Educational Research Association
Keyword(s): College Degree; Education, Adult; Gender Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Adults are a large and increasing proportion of the undergraduate population, but completion among older students has been given little attention. In this paper, I leverage data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth in order to inquire into the rates and correlates of college completion among those who enroll at non-traditional ages. I find that roughly 40% of adult college-goers complete a bachelor's degree. The probability of degree completion varies by socioeconomic background, measured cognitive ability, and early degree expectations. Most striking, however, is a substantial gender effect: women are substantially more likely to complete a bachelor's degree at older ages, controlling for academic ability, work experience, earlier post-secondary attendance, and early work and childbearing history.
Bibliography Citation
Monaghan, David B. "Adult Undergraduates and Bachelor's Degree Attainment: How Common Is Completion? And Who Completes?" Presented: Washington DC, American Educational Research Association (AERA) Annual Meeting, April 2016.
17. Morgan, William R.
New Data Available for the National Longitudinal Surveys
Presented: Montreal, QC, Annual Meetings of the American Educational Research Association, 1983
Cohort(s): NLS General
Publisher: American Educational Research Association
Keyword(s): Divorce; Education; Marital Stability; Marital Status; NLS Description; Tests and Testing

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper describes the content of the NLSY which is of special relevance to educational researchers. This includes the educational section of the annual interview schedule, the school questionnaire, the ASVAB test, and the school transcript data. A brief tabular description by age and educational attainment is presented.
Bibliography Citation
Morgan, William R. "New Data Available for the National Longitudinal Surveys." Presented: Montreal, QC, Annual Meetings of the American Educational Research Association, 1983.
18. Owings, Jeffrey A.
Owings, Maria F.
Steczak, Cheryl
Impact of Motherhood on the Career Patterns of Working Women: Differences in the Life Histories and Career Status of Mothers and Women Without Children
Presented: Boston, MA, American Educational Research Association, 1980
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: American Educational Research Association
Keyword(s): Career Patterns; Children; Job Satisfaction; Mobility; Mothers; Schooling; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Statistical analyses presented here do not contradict the suggestions of theorists in vocational development that the employed mother has many obstacles to surmount as her career develops. That she is more likely to come from lower levels of the socioeconomic ladder and to have completed fewer years of education, coupled with her availability to work only part-time, in some sense accounts for her having to fill lower status jobs. It would seem that such circumstances do not foster upward mobility and, indeed, perhaps perpetuate the past socioeconomic conditions of these women. However, in spite of these influences, these analyses suggest that personal attitudes about childrearing differ significantly between employed mothers and working women who do not have children.
Bibliography Citation
Owings, Jeffrey A., Maria F. Owings and Cheryl Steczak. "Impact of Motherhood on the Career Patterns of Working Women: Differences in the Life Histories and Career Status of Mothers and Women Without Children." Presented: Boston, MA, American Educational Research Association, 1980.
19. Pendola, Andrew
Baker, David P.
Fortified, Not Secularized: Longitudinal Influence of Higher Education on Religious Beliefs and Behaviors
Presented: San Antonio TX, American Educational Research Association Annual Meeting, April-May 2017
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: American Educational Research Association
Keyword(s): Educational Attainment; Religion; Transition, Adulthood

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

It has long been assumed that higher levels of education would lead to more liberal beliefs and an overall decline in religiosity for young adults, yet these predictions have largely gone unfulfilled. Using longitudinal data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, this study examines the effect of higher levels of education on specific religious attitudes during the critical transitions of early adulthood. Results indicate that education reduces concrete and exclusivist religious beliefs, does not influence prayer, and increases broad spiritual beliefs. More importantly, results of proportional hazard models demonstrate that education significantly fortifies extant religious beliefs, be they of liberal or fundamental. In sum, educational institutions may tend to be more liberal, but they are not necessarily secularizing.
Bibliography Citation
Pendola, Andrew and David P. Baker. "Fortified, Not Secularized: Longitudinal Influence of Higher Education on Religious Beliefs and Behaviors." Presented: San Antonio TX, American Educational Research Association Annual Meeting, April-May 2017.
20. Porowski, Allan
Merola, Stacey
Timing of College Dropout: Factors Related to Dropping Out and Persistence in College
Presented: San Antonio TX, American Educational Research Association Annual Meeting, April-May 2017
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: American Educational Research Association
Keyword(s): College Dropouts; Educational Attainment; Family Income; Grade Point Average (GPA)/Grades

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Survival and ROC analyses were conducted using a nationally representative sample from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY-97) to investigate dropout from four- and two-year colleges. We found that dropout from four-year colleges seems to follow what may be considered a more "traditional" pattern based on prior literature. Students were less likely to drop out of four-year schools if they had higher high school GPAs and came from families with higher household incomes. Predictors of two-year college dropout are largely different (and sometimes the opposite) from predictors of four-year college dropout, yet the dynamics of dropout follow a similar pattern at both types of schools, with approximately 25% of dropout occurring in the first semester.
Bibliography Citation
Porowski, Allan and Stacey Merola. "Timing of College Dropout: Factors Related to Dropping Out and Persistence in College." Presented: San Antonio TX, American Educational Research Association Annual Meeting, April-May 2017.
21. Sandell, Steven H.
Demand for College Quality
Presented: New York, NY, American Educational Research Association Meetings, 1977
Cohort(s): Young Men, Young Women
Publisher: American Educational Research Association
Keyword(s): College Education; Educational Attainment; Educational Returns; Family Resources; Fathers, Influence; I.Q.; Schooling

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The quality of the college education obtained by young men and, to a lesser extent, young women is related to their ability and the socioeconomic position of their parental families. Young men and women from high income families obtain both greater quantity and quality education than those from low income families. Part of the economic return to ability is probably a return to college quality. The study's findings help explain the smaller return to education for married women when compared to married men.
Bibliography Citation
Sandell, Steven H. "Demand for College Quality." Presented: New York, NY, American Educational Research Association Meetings, 1977.
22. Sandell, Steven H.
Johnson, Rex C.
Young Women and Higher Education
Presented: New York, NY, American Educational Research Association Meetings, 1977
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: American Educational Research Association
Keyword(s): College Enrollment; Family Income; Fathers, Influence; Siblings; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The decisions of young women to enter college, as well as their choice of college, seem to be consistent with the economic investment model. White women's desired, expected, and actual college attendance are related positively to their parents' educational attainment, family income, and their own mental ability, and related negatively to the number of siblings. Similar, but statistically weaker findings are obtained for black women, with the exception of the effect of number of siblings. A significant and positive relationship exists between young women's mental ability, family income and various measures of the quality of the college attended by white women.
Bibliography Citation
Sandell, Steven H. and Rex C. Johnson. "Young Women and Higher Education." Presented: New York, NY, American Educational Research Association Meetings, 1977.
23. Shea, John R.
Wilkens, Roger A.
Determinants of Educational Attainment and Retention in School
Presented: New York, NY, American Educational Research Association Meetings, 1971
Cohort(s): Young Men
Publisher: American Educational Research Association
Keyword(s): College Education; Dropouts; Educational Aspirations/Expectations; Educational Attainment; High School; Household Income; I.Q.; Parental Influences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The paper examines the economic, social, and demographic correlates of (1) premature withdrawal of young men from high school and (2) transition from high school to college. The AID analysis indicates that dropping out of high school is associated with age-in-grade, educational aspirations, family income, I.Q., race, region, and expenditures per student. Educational expectations, curriculum, race, family composition, and the educational attainment of parents were strongly predictive of transition to college.
Bibliography Citation
Shea, John R. and Roger A. Wilkens. "Determinants of Educational Attainment and Retention in School." Presented: New York, NY, American Educational Research Association Meetings, 1971.
24. Smith, Megan L.
Moilanen, Kristin L.
Predicting Middle School Students' Academic Self-Esteem: Family- and School-Level Antecedents
Presented: Washington DC, American Educational Research Association (AERA) Annual Meeting, April 2016
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: American Educational Research Association
Keyword(s): Parenting Skills/Styles; Racial Differences; School Performance; Self-Esteem

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Middle school students' perception of their academic competence is important to their academic achievement. Studies have investigated academic self-esteem in relation to demographics, parenting, and school connectedness; yet few studies have included all these factors in one model. Study data were drawn from the Children of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (CNLSY-79, N=855). Prior academic self-esteem was most predictive of current academic self-esteem, followed by low levels of school disconnectedness, high levels of cognitively stimulating parenting and black race. Notably, feeling disconnected from school had more weight than parenting, familial SES, and race. Thus, efforts to foster students' connectedness to the school setting may compensate for contextual risk factors that may impede academic success.
Bibliography Citation
Smith, Megan L. and Kristin L. Moilanen. "Predicting Middle School Students' Academic Self-Esteem: Family- and School-Level Antecedents." Presented: Washington DC, American Educational Research Association (AERA) Annual Meeting, April 2016.