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Author: Dufur, Mikaela J.
Resulting in 8 citations.
1. Dufur, Mikaela J.
Rowley, Kristie J.
Pribesh, Shana
Jarvis, Jonathan
Yue, Yuanyuan
Otero, Carolina
Alexander, Alyssa J.
Ferguson, Amanda
Enrollment in Two- and Four-Year Colleges: The Role of Family Structures and Transitions
Presented: San Antonio TX, American Educational Research Association Annual Meeting, April-May 2017
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: American Educational Research Association
Keyword(s): College Enrollment; Family Income; Family Structure; Financial Assistance; Parents, Single; Post-Secondary Transcripts

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Children in disrupted families are less likely to apply to, be accepted to, or attend four-year colleges and universities than are their peers from stable, two-parent families. We extend exploration into why this may occur to youths' decisions to attend two- or four-year schools. To test this relationship, we use new data from the National Longitudinal Study of Youth-1997 Cohort Post-Secondary Transcript Study (NLSY97-PTS). Logistic regression models suggest that financial resources--both income and college support--explain enrollment differences between single mother families and two-biological-parent families. Selectivity effects explain differences for youth living only with fathers or with neither biological parent. Differences for youth with social fathers persist in our models.
Bibliography Citation
Dufur, Mikaela J., Kristie J. Rowley, Shana Pribesh, Jonathan Jarvis, Yuanyuan Yue, Carolina Otero, Alyssa J. Alexander and Amanda Ferguson. "Enrollment in Two- and Four-Year Colleges: The Role of Family Structures and Transitions." Presented: San Antonio TX, American Educational Research Association Annual Meeting, April-May 2017.
2. Hoffmann, John P.
Dufur, Mikaela J.
Huang, Lynn
Drug Use and Job Quits: A Longitudinal Analysis
Journal of Drug Issues 37,3 (Summer 2007): 569-596
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: College of Criminology and Criminal Justice
Keyword(s): Drug Use; Gender Differences; Mobility, Job; Quits; Unemployment

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Voluntary job separation, or quitting, occurs for a variety of reasons. Although it is often a positive move, it may also lead to periods of unemployment. Studies suggest that one factor that may be implicated in the likelihood of quitting is illicit drug use: Adult drug users may not only quit more frequently but also have a heightened probability of unemployment following a quit. Yet, prior research has not taken a sufficient longitudinal perspective, considered contemporary research on job mobility, nor examined gender differences. We assessed the association using longitudinal data on 8,512 individuals followed from 1984 to 1995. The results indicated that marijuana and cocaine use were associated with a higher probability of quitting. Moreover, marijuana use among males, but not females, was associated with a higher likelihood of experiencing periods of unemployment following a quit. We discuss the implications of these results for understanding gender-distinct patterns of drug use and occupational trajectories. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

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Bibliography Citation
Hoffmann, John P., Mikaela J. Dufur and Lynn Huang. "Drug Use and Job Quits: A Longitudinal Analysis." Journal of Drug Issues 37,3 (Summer 2007): 569-596.
3. Parcel, Toby L.
Dufur, Mikaela J.
Capital at Home and at School: Effects on Child Social Adjustment
Presented: Chicago, IL, American Sociological Association Annual Meetings, August 1999
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Behavioral Problems; Child Development; Child School Survey 1994-1995; Children, Adjustment Problems; Home Environment; Human Capital; Schooling; Sociability/Socialization/Social Interaction

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Argues for the usefulness of analyzing school & family social capital, human capital, & physical capital as parallel concepts & investigates the effects of family & school social capital on child behavioral problems, controlling for human & physical capital in both contexts. National Longitudinal Survey of Youth merged Mother-Child Data for 1992 & 1994, to which indicators of the children's schools for 1993-1995 have recently been added, are used to study 1,833 children in grades 1-8 for 1992 & 1994. Findings demonstrate that school social capital effects on child behavior are modest in size, while family social capital, school human capital, & family physical capital effects are stronger. Tests of interactive effects suggest that certain types of capital can help to compensate for negative circumstances in children's home or school lives or can work together to boost the positive effects of each type of capital. Implications for which forms of capital investment are most likely to promote child adjustment are discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Parcel, Toby L. and Mikaela J. Dufur. "Capital at Home and at School: Effects on Child Social Adjustment." Presented: Chicago, IL, American Sociological Association Annual Meetings, August 1999.
4. Parcel, Toby L.
Dufur, Mikaela J.
Capital at Home and at School: Effects on Child Social Adjustment
Journal of Marriage and Family 63,1 (February 2001): 32-47.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3599957
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: National Council on Family Relations
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Child School Survey 1994-1995; Children, Behavioral Development; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Human Capital; School Characteristics/Rating/Safety; Sociability/Socialization/Social Interaction

We argue for analyzing school and family social capital, human capital, and financial capital as parallel concepts and investigate their effects on child social adjustment. We use the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) merged Child-Mother Data, to which we add indicators of capital in the children's schools. Findings suggest that although school capital effects are present, family social capital and maternal and child human capital effects are more prevalent. Interaction between family and school capital refine these findings. We derive inferences regarding how investment at home and at school can work together to promote child social adjustment.
Bibliography Citation
Parcel, Toby L. and Mikaela J. Dufur. "Capital at Home and at School: Effects on Child Social Adjustment." Journal of Marriage and Family 63,1 (February 2001): 32-47.
5. Parcel, Toby L.
Dufur, Mikaela J.
Capital at Home and at School: Effects on Student Achievement
Social Forces 79,3 (March 2001): 881-911.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2675612
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: University of North Carolina Press
Keyword(s): Child School Survey 1994-1995; Children, Academic Development; Cognitive Ability; Cognitive Development; Educational Attainment; Family Characteristics; Family Income; Family Influences; Schooling; Tests and Testing

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We investigate the effects of both family and school capital on student math and reading achievement. We use the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) merged Child-Mother Data for 1992 and 1994, to which indicators of capital in the children's schools for 1993-94 and 1994-95 have recently been added. We study children who attended first through eighth grades in both 1992 and 1994, with samples of 2034 for math achievement and 2203 for reading recognition. Findings suggest that school capital effects are modest in size while family capital effects are stronger; combinations of school and family capital boost or modify additive findings. We sketch directions for future research and discuss the usefulness of analyzing school and family capital as parallel concepts.
Bibliography Citation
Parcel, Toby L. and Mikaela J. Dufur. "Capital at Home and at School: Effects on Student Achievement." Social Forces 79,3 (March 2001): 881-911.
6. Parcel, Toby L.
Dufur, Mikaela J.
Family and School Capital Explaining Regional Variation in Math and Reading Achievement
Research in Social Stratification and Mobility 27,3 (September 2009): 157-176.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0276562409000201
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Birthweight; Child School Survey 1994-1995; Children, Academic Development; Family Characteristics; Family Income; Family Influences; Geographical Variation; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Human Capital; Missing Data/Imputation; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Regions; School Characteristics/Rating/Safety; Schooling; Tests and Testing

We know that inequality varies by region and also begins early in life. Bivariate data suggest that 5–14-year-old children in the 1994 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) score differently in reading and mathematics achievement depending on their region, with children in the South and West scoring lower. We combine literatures on regional bases of inequality and family and school capital to generate hypotheses explaining these differences. Analyses of covariance provide supportive evidence. For both outcomes among boys, the variation is explained by additive models including family and child social and human capital, although selected aspects of school capital are also influential; these models also explain math achievement among girls. A model including both additive and interactive effects explains regional differences in reading achievement for girls. We interpret these findings in terms of their implications for studying inequality in child achievement as well as for emphasizing the importance of regional inequality, particularly beyond the South versus non-South distinction.
Bibliography Citation
Parcel, Toby L. and Mikaela J. Dufur. "Family and School Capital Explaining Regional Variation in Math and Reading Achievement." Research in Social Stratification and Mobility 27,3 (September 2009): 157-176.
7. Parcel, Toby L.
Nickoll, Rebecca A.
Dufur, Mikaela J.
The Effects of Parental Work and Maternal Nonemployment on Children's Reading and Math Achievement
Work and Occupations 23,4 (November 1996): 461-483.
Also: http://wox.sagepub.com/content/23/4/461.abstract
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Birthweight; Child Health; Children, Academic Development; Cognitive Development; Education; Maternal Employment; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

James Coleman's theory regarding family social capital and Mel Kohn's ideas regarding work and personality suggest that parental work may affect child cognition. Using a sample of 1,067 nine- to twelve-year-old children of working and non-working mothers from the 1992 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth's Child-Mother data set, it was found that the most important determinants of children's reading and math achievement were characteristics of the children and parents themselves. Paternal work hours had some effects on math achievement, and maternal work influenced reading achievement under some conditions. Policies allowing parents of either sex to schedule work flexibly may facilitate child cognitive achievement. Copyright Sage Publications Inc. 1996. Fulltext online. Photocopy available from ABI/INFORM.
Bibliography Citation
Parcel, Toby L., Rebecca A. Nickoll and Mikaela J. Dufur. "The Effects of Parental Work and Maternal Nonemployment on Children's Reading and Math Achievement." Work and Occupations 23,4 (November 1996): 461-483.
8. Thorpe, Jared
Dufur, Mikaela J.
The (Conditional) Resource Dilution Model: A Family-level Modification
Presented: Philadelphia PA, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2018
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Educational Outcomes; Family Resources; Family Size; Family Structure; Siblings

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The negative relationship between sibship size and educational outcomes has been well documented in social science literature. The majority of studies to date have examined this relationship from the theoretical perspective of the resource dilution model, focusing on the ever-greater division of parental economic resources and time within the nuclear family as the number of children grows. Building upon this model, the conditional resource dilution model posits that the sibsize effect is conditioned by the context surrounding the family unit. Utilizing data from the National Longitudinal Study of Youth - 1997 Cohort, we extend the conditional resource dilution model by examining whether the effect of sibsize is conditioned by family type.
Bibliography Citation
Thorpe, Jared and Mikaela J. Dufur. "The (Conditional) Resource Dilution Model: A Family-level Modification." Presented: Philadelphia PA, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2018.