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Author: Shea, John R.
Resulting in 19 citations.
1. Egge, Karl Albert
Kohen, Andrew I.
Shea, John R.
Zeller, Frederick A.
Changes in the Federal Minimum Wage and the Employment of Young Men, 1966-67
In: Youth Unemployment and Minimum Wages: Bureau of Labor Statistics Bulletin 1657. Washington, DC: U.S. GPO, 1970
Cohort(s): Young Men
Publisher: U.S. Government Printing Office
Keyword(s): Minimum Wage; Teenagers; Unemployment, Youth

These data permit the "before and after" experience of youth to be related to the wage they were earning before the new minimum became effective. The authors ask whether those youth whose marginal productivity was lower than the newly established minimum had relatively less favorable employment experiences after the minimum wage changes than those whose wages already had been above the minimums. One would expect these low productivity youngsters to be among the first to feel whatever restriction of employment opportunities the minimum wage created. The fact that the authors have been unable to find in their data any general tendency for the foregoing relationship leads to the conclusion that if the minimum wage increases did indeed create unemployment among youth, the effect was not a pronounced one. Even when the analysis was focused on these subgroups of young men who might, on a priori grounds, be expected to be most vulnerable to the impact of the minimum wage, only a small number of such subgroups showed any signs of adversity.
Bibliography Citation
Egge, Karl Albert, Andrew I. Kohen, John R. Shea and Frederick A. Zeller. "Changes in the Federal Minimum Wage and the Employment of Young Men, 1966-67" In: Youth Unemployment and Minimum Wages: Bureau of Labor Statistics Bulletin 1657. Washington, DC: U.S. GPO, 1970
2. Grasso, John T.
Shea, John R.
Effects of High School Curriculum on Age-Earnings Profiles
Proceedings, Social Statistics Section, American Statistical Association (1972): 265-70
Cohort(s): Young Men
Publisher: American Statistical Association
Keyword(s): Blue-Collar Jobs; Earnings; Educational Returns; High School Completion/Graduates; High School Curriculum; Vocational Education

Within a multivariate framework this paper examines the relationship between high school curriculum and one important indicator of labor market success, hourly rate of pay subsequent to graduation. In view of our failure to find a statistically significant difference in starting wages for any curriculum group, for either whites or blacks, it appears that the vocational high school curriculum per se does not provide skills which lead to immediate market advantages.
Bibliography Citation
Grasso, John T. and John R. Shea. "Effects of High School Curriculum on Age-Earnings Profiles." Proceedings, Social Statistics Section, American Statistical Association (1972): 265-70.
3. Grasso, John T.
Shea, John R.
Effects of Vocational Education Programs: Research Findings and Issues
In: Planning Papers for the Vocational Education Study. Washington DC: National Institute of Education, 1979
Cohort(s): Young Men, Young Women
Publisher: National Institute of Education, U.S.
Keyword(s): Discrimination, Sex; Educational Aspirations/Expectations; High School Curriculum; NLS of H.S. Class of 1972; Occupational Aspirations; Project Talent; Vocational Education; Work Knowledge

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper contains a review of available data and evidence from selected national surveys bearing upon vocational education issues. After a brief introduction to the national surveys, the identification of the high school curriculum of respondents is discussed, revealing shortcomings and weaknesses that have indeterminate effects upon findings based on these data. The case of female vocational students suggests that the vocational programs in high schools should be interpreted separately by sex. Findings presented on the high school students include curriculum differences in students' backgrounds and aptitudes, in attitudes toward school, in educational aspirations, in occupational goals, in occupational information, and on career development issues. This review includes topics concerning curricular effects in basic skills, on retention in high school, in transition to college and on educational attainment, and in acquisition of post-school training. Finally, the review discusses the effects of curriculum and training upon post-school labor market and psychological or attitudinal outcomes.
Bibliography Citation
Grasso, John T. and John R. Shea. "Effects of Vocational Education Programs: Research Findings and Issues" In: Planning Papers for the Vocational Education Study. Washington DC: National Institute of Education, 1979
4. Grasso, John T.
Shea, John R.
Vocational Education and Training: Impact on Youth
Working Paper, Carnegie Council on Policy Studies in Higher Education, Berkeley, CA, 1979
Cohort(s): Young Men, Young Women
Publisher: Carnegie Council on Policy Studies in Higher Education
Keyword(s): Dropouts; Educational Attainment; High School Curriculum; Job Satisfaction; Job Training; Peers/Peer influence/Peer relations; Project Talent; Vocational Education; Work Attitudes

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The report examines: (1) choice of high school curriculum; (2) relations between curriculum, on the one hand, and aspirations, occupational information, and highest year of school completed on the other; (3) psychological reactions to the high school experience of those who have followed various tracks; and (4) the early labor market and further training experiences of former vocational students as compared with their general program peers with equivalent years of schooling (10-11; 12; 13-15). Multivariate techniques, including path analysis of the educational attainment process, are used extensively. The experience of men and women, blacks and whites, is treated separately. The analysis is based on data from the NLS of Young Men (l966-73) and Young Women( l968-72).
Bibliography Citation
Grasso, John T. and John R. Shea. "Vocational Education and Training: Impact on Youth." Working Paper, Carnegie Council on Policy Studies in Higher Education, Berkeley, CA, 1979.
5. Kim, Sookon
Roderick, Roger D.
Shea, John R.
Dual Careers, Volume 2: A Longitudinal Study of Labor Market Experience of Women
Manpower Research Monograph 21, Volume 2. Washington DC: US GPO, 1973.
Also: http://www.eric.ed.gov/PDFS/ED068713.pdf
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Children; Family Influences; Health Factors; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Job Satisfaction; Labor Force Participation; Marital Status; Mobility, Interfirm; Work Attitudes

The main purpose of this document is to describe the magnitude and patterns of change in labor market behavior that occurred during the two-year period between the 1967 and 1969 interviews. As pointed out in the initial report, ". . . it is during this age span [30 to 44 years of age] that many married women return to the labor force after their children are in school." Therefore, one would expect not only an increase in labor force participation rates over the two-year period but also improvements in occupational assignment, accumulation of seniority rights, and an increase in earnings, all of which are positively associated with length of employment experience. While varying types of homemaking activities, especially when there are young children in the home, play a significant role in the decisions of most women to participate in the labor market, changes in marital status, attitudes, health condition, employment opportunities, and many other factors are also expected to influence a woman's labor force and employment behavior.
Bibliography Citation
Kim, Sookon, Roger D. Roderick and John R. Shea. Dual Careers, Volume 2: A Longitudinal Study of Labor Market Experience of Women. Manpower Research Monograph 21, Volume 2. Washington DC: US GPO, 1973..
6. Kohen, Andrew I.
Parnes, Herbert S.
Shea, John R.
Income Instability Among Young and Middle-Aged Men
In: Personal Distribution of Income and Wealth. J. Smith, ed. New York, NY: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1975.
Also: Center for Human Resource Research, 1973.
Cohort(s): Older Men, Young Men
Publisher: National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)
Keyword(s): Earnings; Household Income

In this paper, the authors attempt: (1) to quantify the influence on measured income inequality of lengthening the accounting period; (2) to describe the mechanism through which income instability among male heads of household is manifested (e.g., changes in sources of income, hours worked, and wage rates); and (3) to identify some of the demographic and economic characteristics of those household heads whose income is "unstable" over a two-or three- year period, in the sense of changing at above-average or below-average rates.
Bibliography Citation
Kohen, Andrew I., Herbert S. Parnes and John R. Shea. "Income Instability Among Young and Middle-Aged Men" In: Personal Distribution of Income and Wealth. J. Smith, ed. New York, NY: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1975.
7. Meyer, Jack A.
Shea, John R.
Demographic and Social Characteristics
In: Years for Decision, Volume 1, Manpower Research Monograph 24. Washington DC: U.S. GPO, 1971
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Age and Ageing; Educational Attainment; Marital Status; Occupations, Female; Schooling

This chapter deals with the interrelations among age, school status, and marital and family status of young women. Educational curriculum among students and educational attainment and occupational skill development among young women who are not in school are both discussed. Factors determining enrollment or non-enrollment in school are examined, and the chapter concludes with an introduction to the analyses used throughout the volume.
Bibliography Citation
Meyer, Jack A. and John R. Shea. "Demographic and Social Characteristics" In: Years for Decision, Volume 1, Manpower Research Monograph 24. Washington DC: U.S. GPO, 1971
8. Parnes, Herbert S.
Shea, John R.
Spitz, Ruth S.
Zeller, Frederick A.
Dual Careers, Volume 1: A Longitudinal Study of the Labor Market Experience of Women
Manpower Research Monograph 21, Volume 1. Washington DC: US GPO, 1970
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Career Patterns; Child Care; Children; Family Background and Culture; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Job Training; Marital Status; Mobility, Job; Part-Time Work; Work Attitudes

Data from the first interview (1967) of Mature Women age 30-44 in 1967 are used to examine their labor market status and attitudes, as well as their prior work experience and plans for the future. Marital history and status, family background, health, education, income patterns and attitudes toward work and home are investigated, as are participation in the labor force, occupation, rate of pay, transportation, and child care. Part-time employment and its ramifications are explored. Occupational and geographic mobility and movement are studied and their relationship to career beginnings shown. Work attitudes and job attachment are evaluated; and, finally, major sources of variation in labor market behavior are explored and found to be largely race, education, marital status, ages of children, and work-related attitudes.
Bibliography Citation
Parnes, Herbert S., John R. Shea, Ruth S. Spitz and Frederick A. Zeller. Dual Careers, Volume 1: A Longitudinal Study of the Labor Market Experience of Women. Manpower Research Monograph 21, Volume 1. Washington DC: US GPO, 1970.
9. Roderick, Roger D.
Shea, John R.
Typing, Shorthand, and Occupational Assignments of Women: Some Black-White Differentials
Report, Manpower Administration, U.S. Department of Labor, 1972
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Employment; High School Completion/Graduates; Racial Differences; Urbanization/Urban Living; Vocational Education

The purpose of the paper is to examine some of the factors that may help explain aggregate black-white differences in having had typing and/or shorthand while in high school, and in having used such training in occupations ostensibly requiring typing and/or shorthand skills. Data are from the NLS of Young Women, with the subsets under consideration consisting of those who were full-time employees and had completed exactly 12 years of high school. While urban/non-urban variation in typing-shorthand training was slight, black youth from the urban South were less likely to have such training than were black youth from urban non-South. A positive relationship was found between mental ability and exposure to typing and shorthand. In terms of occupational assignment, typing and shorthand training was directly related to occupancy of clerical jobs in general, but a small proportion of those with such training (especially among blacks) were in jobs most likely to actually require typing and shorthand skills.
Bibliography Citation
Roderick, Roger D. and John R. Shea. "Typing, Shorthand, and Occupational Assignments of Women: Some Black-White Differentials." Report, Manpower Administration, U.S. Department of Labor, 1972.
10. Roderick, Roger D.
Shea, John R.
Kim, Sookon
Unemployment Experiences of Nonstudents
In: Years for Decision, Volume 1, Manpower Research Monograph 24. Washington DC: U.S. GPO, 1971
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: U.S. Government Printing Office
Keyword(s): Educational Attainment; Marital Status; Minimum Wage; Occupational Status; Racial Differences; Unemployment; Wage Rates

Unemployment of young female nonstudents is examined in order to ascertain how much influence demand conditions have on unemployment and to describe some personal correlates of unemployed out-of-school young women. Marital status, age, race, and educational attainment are all shown to be related to the employment rate. Occupation, attitude, and rate of pay all appear to be related as well. The federal minimum wage affects this last factor, however, and an analysis of this has not been done.
Bibliography Citation
Roderick, Roger D., John R. Shea and Sookon Kim. "Unemployment Experiences of Nonstudents" In: Years for Decision, Volume 1, Manpower Research Monograph 24. Washington DC: U.S. GPO, 1971
11. Shea, John R.
Manpower Policies and Unemployment Among Youth
Presented: Madison, WI, Industrial Relations Research Association Annual Meeting, 1977
Cohort(s): Young Men, Young Women
Publisher: Industrial Relations Research Association ==> LERA
Keyword(s): Mobility, Job; Quits; Unemployment

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper examines (1) the character of unemployment among young women during the recent prosperity (l967 and l968), and (2) whether joblessness among youth seems to have been a serious personal, economic problem.
Bibliography Citation
Shea, John R. "Manpower Policies and Unemployment Among Youth." Presented: Madison, WI, Industrial Relations Research Association Annual Meeting, 1977.
12. Shea, John R.
Welfare Mothers: Barriers to Labor Force Entry
Journal of Human Resources 8 (1973): 90-102.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/144816
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: University of Wisconsin Press
Keyword(s): Aid for Families with Dependent Children (AFDC); Family Income; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Marital Status; Poverty; Sex Roles

(Editor's note: from Volume 8, the Work and Welfare Supplement): Using interview data from a national sample of 30- to 44-year-old women who were out of the labor force in 1967, reactions to a hypothetical job offer are analyzed. While black women are more likely than white to have responded affirmatively, there is no difference by potential eligibility for a family assistance payment. Among the potentially eligible, multiple regression (OLS) analysis shows that either (or both) (1) willingness to take a hypothetical job, or (2) required rate of pay is systematically related to marital status, receipt of AFDC, poor health, family income less respondent's earnings, and attitude toward the propriety of mother's working.
Bibliography Citation
Shea, John R. "Welfare Mothers: Barriers to Labor Force Entry." Journal of Human Resources 8 (1973): 90-102.
13. Shea, John R.
Emerine, Richard J.
Wage Rate Differences Among the Working Poor
Proceedings, Social Statistics Section, American Statistical Association (1972): 352-357
Cohort(s): Mature Women, Older Men
Publisher: American Statistical Association
Keyword(s): Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Job Tenure; Poverty; Regions

It is quite clear that race, region, city size, job tenure, and years of schooling strongly influence a person's wage rate. In addition, the number of years of past work experience is an important variable for the women. Nevertheless, with the possible exception of region (for men) and race (for women), the impact of these variables appears to be greater for the nonpoor than the poor. This is undoubtedly, in part, a consequence of how poverty status is defined, since low wage rates are an important factor in accounting for the inclusion of employed individuals in the poverty category. Thus, for this group, there is relatively little variation in the dependent variable.
Bibliography Citation
Shea, John R. and Richard J. Emerine. "Wage Rate Differences Among the Working Poor." Proceedings, Social Statistics Section, American Statistical Association (1972): 352-357.
14. Shea, John R.
Kim, Sookon
Roderick, Roger D.
Dual Careers, Volume 2: A Longitudinal Study of the Labor Market Experience of Women
Washington DC: US GPO, 1973
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: U.S. Government Printing Office
Keyword(s): Family Influences; Health Factors; Job Satisfaction; Marital Status; Mobility, Job; Sex Roles; Wages; Wives

Data from the first three stages of the study of 5,083 women who were 30 to 44 in 1967 are used to determine the labor market experience of women. How marital status, the number and ages of children present in the home, health attitudes and physical condition influence women's employment is discussed. Differences in job status are then examined through changes from 1967 to 1969 in rate of pay, job satisfaction, and employer. Correlates of interfirm movement are also investigated, as well as some consequences of job changing. Changing employers, as a rule, appears to be associated with a higher rate of pay and a higher degree of job satisfaction, and, among white women, a change in marital status.
Bibliography Citation
Shea, John R., Sookon Kim and Roger D. Roderick. Dual Careers, Volume 2: A Longitudinal Study of the Labor Market Experience of Women. Washington DC: US GPO, 1973.
15. Shea, John R.
Meyer, Jack A.
Potential Recipients of Family Assistance Payments: Characteristics and Labor Market Behavior
Report, Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1972
Cohort(s): Mature Women, Older Men, Young Men, Young Women
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Labor Force Participation; Rural Areas; Unemployment; Wages; Welfare

This report analyzes characteristics and labor market experiences of families that would have been eligible for a family assistance payment in the mid- and late 1960s had an early version of the Nixon Administration's Family Assistance Plan (FAP) been in effect. Data are derived from initial interviews with four probability samples of the civilian population of the United States: men 45-50 years of age; women 30-44; and men and women 14-24. Each group of interviewees contains about 3,000 white and 1,400 black persons. Rural origins, the broken nature of many families, and large numbers of children are important determinants of potential FAP eligibility. Adult men and women in poverty generally hold as favorable attitudes toward work as their nonpoor counterparts. Employment experiences (i.e. occupational assignments, weeks worked in base year, and rates of pay) are very important as are the health status, education, training, and several other characteristics. Implications for national policy are discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Shea, John R. and Jack A. Meyer. "Potential Recipients of Family Assistance Payments: Characteristics and Labor Market Behavior." Report, Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1972.
16. Shea, John R.
Roderick, Roger D.
Zeller, Frederick A.
Kohen, Andrew I.
Years for Decision, Volume 1: A Longitudinal Study of the Educational and Labor market Experience of Young Women
Manpower Research Monograph 24, Volume 1. Washington DC: US GPO, 1971
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Child Care; College Enrollment; Educational Aspirations/Expectations; Family Background and Culture; High School; Job Training; Occupational Aspirations; Teenagers; Unemployment, Youth; Vocational Education

Data from the initial survey of young women age 14-24 in 1968 are used to examine their labor market status, attitudes and previous training, education, and work experience. Plans for the future, not only for employment, but also for marriage, education and children are also examined including their impact on young women's labor market experiences. Unemployment, labor force participation, and occupational distribution of non-students, and the employment status of students are investigated, as are job attachment, rate of pay, child care arrangements, and family background. Due to the large variation in age, it was difficult to generalize for the entire sample, but subsequent surveys will lessen this discrepancy and permit a complete analysis of the group as a whole.
Bibliography Citation
Shea, John R., Roger D. Roderick, Frederick A. Zeller and Andrew I. Kohen. Years for Decision, Volume 1: A Longitudinal Study of the Educational and Labor market Experience of Young Women. Manpower Research Monograph 24, Volume 1. Washington DC: US GPO, 1971.
17. Shea, John R.
Wilkens, Roger A.
Determinants of Educational Attainment and Retention in School
Presented: New York, NY, American Educational Research Association Meetings, 1971
Cohort(s): Young Men
Publisher: American Educational Research Association
Keyword(s): College Education; Dropouts; Educational Aspirations/Expectations; Educational Attainment; High School; Household Income; I.Q.; Parental Influences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The paper examines the economic, social, and demographic correlates of (1) premature withdrawal of young men from high school and (2) transition from high school to college. The AID analysis indicates that dropping out of high school is associated with age-in-grade, educational aspirations, family income, I.Q., race, region, and expenditures per student. Educational expectations, curriculum, race, family composition, and the educational attainment of parents were strongly predictive of transition to college.
Bibliography Citation
Shea, John R. and Roger A. Wilkens. "Determinants of Educational Attainment and Retention in School." Presented: New York, NY, American Educational Research Association Meetings, 1971.
18. Shea, John R.
Wilkens, Roger A.
Determinants of Educational Attainment and Retention in School
Report, Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1972
Cohort(s): Young Men
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): College Education; Dropouts; Educational Aspirations/Expectations; Educational Attainment; High School; Parental Influences

The report examines the economic, social, and demographic correlates of (1) premature withdrawal of young men from high school and (2) transition from high school to college.
Bibliography Citation
Shea, John R. and Roger A. Wilkens. "Determinants of Educational Attainment and Retention in School." Report, Columbus OH: Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1972.
19. Zeller, Frederick A.
Shea, John R.
Kohen, Andrew I.
Meyer, Jack A.
Career Thresholds, Volume 2: A Longitudinal Study of the Educational and Labor Market Experience of Male Youth
Washington DC: US GPO, 1971
Cohort(s): Young Men
Publisher: U.S. Government Printing Office
Keyword(s): Dropouts; Educational Aspirations/Expectations; Family Influences; High School; Job Training; Mobility; Mobility, Job

The present report, the second in the series on the NLS of Young Men, summarizes some of the findings of the second round of interviews with that cohort that were conducted in the autumn of l967. Based exclusively on tabular data, its primary purpose is to describe the magnitude and patterns of change that occurred in the educational and labor market status of the youth during the 12-month period between the first and second surveys. The age span covered in the survey includes those years of a young man's life in which he first becomes integrated into the world of work. This is a critical period in the total socialization process. The young man's subsequent labor market behavior is influenced substantially by his educational and early labor market experiences. In this report, the authors have begun an analysis of these experiences by focusing on the magnitude and character of various changes that have occurred over a one-year period--in school enrollment status, labor force participation, unemployment experience, occupational and interfirm mobility, and educational aspirations.
Bibliography Citation
Zeller, Frederick A., John R. Shea, Andrew I. Kohen and Jack A. Meyer. Career Thresholds, Volume 2: A Longitudinal Study of the Educational and Labor Market Experience of Male Youth. Washington DC: US GPO, 1971.