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Source: Contemporary Economic Policy
Resulting in 12 citations.
1. Arkes, Jeremy
Shen, Yu-Chu
For Better or For Worse, But How About a Recession?
Contemporary Economic Policy 32,2 (April 2014): 275-287.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/coep.12029/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Western Economic Association International
Keyword(s): Divorce; Economics, Regional; Marital Instability; Modeling, Hazard/Event History/Survival/Duration; Unemployment Rate, Regional

In light of the current economic crisis, we estimate hazard models of divorce to determine how state and national unemployment rates affect the likelihood of a divorce or separation. With data in the United States over the 1978–2008 period from the 1979 NLSY, we find some evidence indicating that a higher unemployment rate increases the risk of a marriage ending for couples in years 6–10 of marriage (suggesting counter-cyclical divorce/separation probabilities) but has no significant effect for couples in years 1–5 of marriage and those married longer than 10 years. The estimates are generally stronger in magnitude when using national instead of state unemployment rates and when considering just divorces rather than the first observed divorce or separation.
Bibliography Citation
Arkes, Jeremy and Yu-Chu Shen. "For Better or For Worse, But How About a Recession?" Contemporary Economic Policy 32,2 (April 2014): 275-287.
2. Baum, Charles L., II
The Effects of Government-Mandated Family Leave on Employer Family Leave Policies
Contemporary Economic Policy 24,3 (July 2006): 432-445.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1093/cep/byj025/full
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Western Economic Association International
Keyword(s): Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA); Leave, Family or Maternity/Paternity; Legislation

The 1993 Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) guarantees employees 12 weeks of unpaid leave. However, studies find either small or insignificant effects of the legislation on employment, work, leave-taking, and wages. Perhaps employees are unable to use the leave because it is unpaid or they do not need family leave because they already may take off work via vacation, sick leave, and disability leave policies. If so, then family leave legislation may have increased employer-provided family leave without corresponding effects on employment-related outcomes. This article examines family leave legislation's effects on employers' family leave policies, finding positive effects.
Bibliography Citation
Baum, Charles L., II. "The Effects of Government-Mandated Family Leave on Employer Family Leave Policies." Contemporary Economic Policy 24,3 (July 2006): 432-445.
3. Chyi, Hau
Ozturk, Orgul Demet
Zhang, Weilong
Welfare Reform and Children's Early Cognitive Development
Contemporary Economic Policy 32,4 (October 2014): 729-751.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/coep.12042/abstract
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Western Economic Association International
Keyword(s): Aid for Families with Dependent Children (AFDC); Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Birthweight; Leave, Family or Maternity/Paternity; Maternal Employment; Medicaid/Medicare; Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Welfare

In this paper, we use a dynamic structural model to measure the effects of (1) single mothers' work and welfare use decisions and (2) welfare reform initiatives on the early cognitive development of the children of the NLSY79 mothers. We use PIAT-Math scores as a measure of attainment and show that both the mothers' work and welfare use benefit children on average. Our simulation of a policy that combines a time limit with work requirement reduces the use of welfare and increases employment significantly. These changes in turn significantly increase children's cognitive attainment. This implies that the welfare reform was not only successful in achieving its stated goals, but was also beneficial to welfare children's outcomes. In another policy simulation, we show that increasing work incentives for welfare population by exempting labor income from welfare tax can be a very successful policy with some additional benefits for children's outcomes. Finally, a counterfactual with an extended maternal leave policy significantly reduces employment and has negative, though economically insignificant, impact on cognitive outcomes.
Bibliography Citation
Chyi, Hau, Orgul Demet Ozturk and Weilong Zhang. "Welfare Reform and Children's Early Cognitive Development." Contemporary Economic Policy 32,4 (October 2014): 729-751.
4. Hoyt, Gail Mitchell
Chaloupka, Frank J.
Effect of Survey Conditions on Self-Reported Substance Use
Contemporary Economic Policy 12,3 (July 1994): 109-121.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1465-7287.1994.tb00439.x/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Western Economic Association International
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Data Quality/Consistency; Disability; Economics, Demographic; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Modeling, Probit; Morbidity; Mortality; Self-Reporting; Substance Use

This paper examines the impact of survey conditions on the self-reported use of marijuana, cocaine, and alcohol in the 1984 and 1988 waves of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY). The analysis obtains probit estimates of lifetime and current participation rates and ordered probit estimates for the current frequency of use. The results clearly indicate that the manner in which the NLSY survey is administered significantly affects the self-reported substance use data. The presence of others at administration, self-administration, and data collection by telephone interview are particularly important influences.
Bibliography Citation
Hoyt, Gail Mitchell and Frank J. Chaloupka. "Effect of Survey Conditions on Self-Reported Substance Use." Contemporary Economic Policy 12,3 (July 1994): 109-121.
5. Kaestner, Robert
A Note on the Effect of Minimum Drinking Age Laws on Youth Alcohol Consumption
Contemporary Economic Policy 18,3 (July 2000): 315-325.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1465-7287.2000.tb00028.x/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Western Economic Association International
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Gender Differences; Youth Problems

This study uses data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth to investigate the effect of minimum drinking age laws (MDALs) on youth alcohol consumption. Two considerations motivated the analysis. First, results from previous studies provide conflicting evidence of the effect of MDALs on alcohol consumption. Second, all previous studies of the effects of MDALs on alcohol consumption have failed to control for unmeasured time-varying state effects. This study addresses this latter issue by using a difference-in-differences-in-differences (DDD) methodology. The results of this study were mixed. On the one hand, a preponderance of estimates of the effect of MDALs on alcohol consumption are negative, although many are not significantly different from zero. On the other hand, estimates of the effect of MDALs differ by gender and exhibit some variation across samples and methods. In the end, I believe the estimates presented in this article are not sufficient to draw a definitive conclusion and suggest the need for additional research. (JEL 118, 112)
Bibliography Citation
Kaestner, Robert. "A Note on the Effect of Minimum Drinking Age Laws on Youth Alcohol Consumption." Contemporary Economic Policy 18,3 (July 2000): 315-325.
6. Koch, Steven F.
Ribar, David C.
A Siblings Analysis of the Effects of Alcohol Consumption Onset on Educational Attainment
Contemporary Economic Policy 19,2 (April 2001): 162-174.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1465-7287.2001.tb00058.x/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Western Economic Association International
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Educational Attainment; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Pairs (also see Siblings); Schooling; Siblings

This article examines the relationship between youthful drinking and educational attainment using data on same-sex siblings pairs from the 1979-1990 panels of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. Different estimators are considered that can be constructed using siblings data, including estimators that adopt key restrictions of the standard regression, family fixed effect and instrumental variable approaches. The properties of these estimators are also considered under more general conditions and it is shown that under very plausible assumptions the effect of drinking on schooling can be bounded. the study finds that estimates of the schooling consequences of youthful drinking are very sensitive to specification issues. The research concludes that the actual effects of youthful drinking on education are likely to be small. Copyright Western Economic Association Apr 2001.
Bibliography Citation
Koch, Steven F. and David C. Ribar. "A Siblings Analysis of the Effects of Alcohol Consumption Onset on Educational Attainment." Contemporary Economic Policy 19,2 (April 2001): 162-174.
7. Maclean, Johanna Catherine
Covington, Reginald
Sikora Kessler, Asia
Labor Market Conditions at School-Leaving: Long-Run Effects on Marriage and Fertility
Contemporary Economic Policy 34,1 (January 2016): 63-88.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/coep.12113/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Western Economic Association International
Keyword(s): Economic Changes/Recession; Education; Fertility; Gender Differences; Geocoded Data; Marriage; Transition, School to Work; Unemployment Rate, Regional

In this study, we assess the long-run impact of labor market conditions at the time of school-leaving on marriage and fertility outcomes. We draw data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979. Our sample left school between 1976 and 1989, and we use variation in the state unemployment rate at the time of school-leaving to identify persistent effects. We find that men who left school when the state unemployment rate was high are less likely to be married and have children at age 45, but are more likely to be divorced. Women, however, are more likely to have children
Bibliography Citation
Maclean, Johanna Catherine, Reginald Covington and Asia Sikora Kessler. "Labor Market Conditions at School-Leaving: Long-Run Effects on Marriage and Fertility." Contemporary Economic Policy 34,1 (January 2016): 63-88.
8. Mendez, Fabio
Sepulveda, Facundo
A Comparative Study of Training in the Private and Public Sectors: Evidence from the United Kingdom and the United States
Contemporary Economic Policy 34,1 (January 2016): 107-118.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/coep.12120/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Western Economic Association International
Keyword(s): British Household Panel Survey (BHPS); Training; Training, Employee; Wage Effects

Formal training programs are one of the main channels through which workers become more productive and experience wage growth. So far, however, most of the results on the effects of employer-provided training come from studying the training received by private sector workers only. We extend the literature by identifying and comparing the effects of private-employer-provided and public-employer-provided training in the United States and the United Kingdom. We address this question using two independent data sets from the British Household Panels Surveys and the American National Longitudinal Survey of Youth of 1979.
Bibliography Citation
Mendez, Fabio and Facundo Sepulveda. "A Comparative Study of Training in the Private and Public Sectors: Evidence from the United Kingdom and the United States." Contemporary Economic Policy 34,1 (January 2016): 107-118.
9. Mohanty, Madhu Sudan
Determination of Participation Decision, Hiring Decision, and Wages in A Double Selection Framework: Male-Female Wage Differentials in the U.S. Labor Market Revisited
Contemporary Economic Policy 19,2 (April 2001): 197-212.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1465-7287.2001.tb00061.x/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Western Economic Association International
Keyword(s): Gender Differences; Labor Force Participation; Labor Market Demographics; Sample Selection; Wage Differentials; Wage Equations

The magnitude of the male-female wage differential is known to be highly sensitive to the specification of the wage equations used. An important source of misspecification is the failure to correct the sample selection bias that results from estimating the wage equation obtained through 2 sequential decisions: the worker's decision to participate in the labor market and the employer's decision to hire. Following a double selection approach and using a sample from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, this article examines the determinants of not only the wage equation but also the worker's participation and the employer's hiring decisions in both male and female samples. The study further demonstrates that the unexplained male-female wage differential remains underestimated when the roles of both selection decisions are ignored in the estimation of wage equations. Copyright Western Economic Association Apr 2001.
Bibliography Citation
Mohanty, Madhu Sudan. "Determination of Participation Decision, Hiring Decision, and Wages in A Double Selection Framework: Male-Female Wage Differentials in the U.S. Labor Market Revisited." Contemporary Economic Policy 19,2 (April 2001): 197-212.
10. Santos, Richard
Seitz, Patricia Ann
School-to-Work Experience of Hispanic Youth
Contemporary Economic Policy 10,4 (October 1992): 65-73.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1465-7287.1992.tb00361.x/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Wiley Online
Keyword(s): College Education; Ethnic Differences; High School and Beyond (HSB); High School Completion/Graduates; High School Dropouts; Hispanic Youth; Hispanics; Labor Force Participation

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Selected studies based on the National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth Labor Market Experiences (NLS) and the High School and Beyond Surveys (HS&B) offer both consistent and conflicting findings about the experience of Hispanics in school and work. Non-high school completion, college attendance, and the link between education and economic gains varied by the sample selected, gender and ethnic group, and model specification. Methodological complexities prevent a meaningful synthesis of the findings. This paper focuses on these research complexities in an attempt to translate the findings into policy statements that could improve Hispanics' school-to-work experience.
Bibliography Citation
Santos, Richard and Patricia Ann Seitz. "School-to-Work Experience of Hispanic Youth." Contemporary Economic Policy 10,4 (October 1992): 65-73.
11. Solberg, Eric J.
The Gender Pay Gap by Occupation: A Test of the Crowding Hypothesis
Contemporary Economic Policy 23,1 (January 2005): 129-148.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1093/cep/byi011/pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Western Economic Association International
Keyword(s): Gender Differences; Occupations; Wages

Identified, structural wage equations for seven occupations are estimated to test the crowding hypothesis—that the gender pay gap is due to females being crowded into low-paying occupations—using data drawn from the 1996 wave of the National Longitudinal Study of Youth (NLSY79). Occupational preferences are used to estimate a logit probability model of occupational assignment to create instruments to control for self-selection. Wage equations are estimated for all workers and for full-time, year-round workers. Identical specifications are estimated for private-sector workers. The results are not consistent with a crowding explanation as the sole source of the gender pay gap unless crowding occurs at less aggregated levels of occupations than those used for this study.
Bibliography Citation
Solberg, Eric J. "The Gender Pay Gap by Occupation: A Test of the Crowding Hypothesis." Contemporary Economic Policy 23,1 (January 2005): 129-148.
12. Thompson, Owen
Drug Policy and Intergenerational Income Mobility in the United States
Contemporary Economic Policy 34,1 (January 2016): 127-145.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/coep.12109/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Western Economic Association International
Keyword(s): Arrests; Criminal Justice System; Drug Use; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Legislation; Mobility, Economic; Racial Differences

A conviction for drug possession blocks some of the most common pathways through which individuals from low income families achieve upward economic mobility in the United States, such as access to higher education, entry-level employment, and military service. These considerations are of growing importance because the number of drug-related arrests have nearly quadrupled since 1980. This article estimates the effect of a conviction for drug possession on earnings mobility using a sample of individuals born between 1980 and 1984, some of the first cohorts to come of age in the context of intensive U.S. drug criminalization and enforcement. To distinguish the effect of a drug conviction from the effect of drug use or general criminality, I compare mobility among individuals with drug convictions to control groups who self-report significant drug use and who have had interactions with the criminal justice system that did not lead to a drug conviction. I find that relative to these groups, a drug conviction reduces the probability of transitioning upward from various points in the lower half of the income distribution by 10-15 percentage points, or as much as 50%, and that these effects are substantially stronger for non-whites than for whites. These findings suggest that a policy of decriminalizing nonviolent drug possession would substantially increase intergenerational mobility among low income populations, and this effect should be weighed alongside more conventional costs and benefits in formulating optimal drug policy.
Bibliography Citation
Thompson, Owen. "Drug Policy and Intergenerational Income Mobility in the United States." Contemporary Economic Policy 34,1 (January 2016): 127-145.