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Author: Yörük, Ceren Ertan
Resulting in 5 citations.
1. Yörük, Baris K.
Yörük, Ceren Ertan
The Impact of Minimum Legal Drinking Age Laws on Alcohol Consumption, Smoking, and Marijuana Use Revisited
Journal of Health Economics 32,2 (March 2013): 477-479.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0167629612001233
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Drug Use; Geocoded Data; Legislation; Smoking (see Cigarette Use)

In volume 30, issue 4 of this journal, we used data from the National Longitudinal Study of Youth, 1997 cohort (NLSY97) to estimate the impact of the minimum legal drinking age (MLDA) laws on alcohol consumption, smoking, and marijuana use among young adults. In our analysis, we used a restricted sample of young adults and considered only those who have consumed alcohol, smoked cigarettes, or used marijuana at least once since the date of their last interview. In this paper, we revisit our original study using the full sample. We show that our results for alcohol consumption in the full sample are similar to those from the restricted sample. However, the effect of the MLDA on smoking and marijuana use is smaller and often statistically insignificant.
Bibliography Citation
Yörük, Baris K. and Ceren Ertan Yörük. "The Impact of Minimum Legal Drinking Age Laws on Alcohol Consumption, Smoking, and Marijuana Use Revisited." Journal of Health Economics 32,2 (March 2013): 477-479.
2. Yörük, Baris K.
Yörük, Ceren Ertan
The Impact of Minimum Legal Drinking Age Laws on Alcohol Consumption, Smoking, and Marijuana Use: Evidence from a Regression Discontinuity Design Using Exact Date of Birth
Journal of Health Economics 30,4 (July 2011): 740-752.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0167629611000634
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Drug Use; Legislation; Modeling; Smoking (see Cigarette Use)

This paper uses a regression discontinuity design to estimate the impact of the minimum legal drinking age laws on alcohol consumption, smoking, and marijuana use among young adults. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (1997 Cohort), we find that granting legal access to alcohol at age 21 leads to an increase in several measures of alcohol consumption, including an up to a 13 percentage point increase in the probability of drinking. Furthermore, this effect is robust under several different parametric and non-parametric models. We also find some evidence that the discrete jump in alcohol consumption at age 21 has negative spillover effects on marijuana use but does not affect the smoking habits of young adults. Our results indicate that although the change in alcohol consumption habits of young adults following their 21st birthday is less severe than previously known, policies that are designed to reduce drinking among young adults may have desirable impacts and can create public health benefits.
Bibliography Citation
Yörük, Baris K. and Ceren Ertan Yörük. "The Impact of Minimum Legal Drinking Age Laws on Alcohol Consumption, Smoking, and Marijuana Use: Evidence from a Regression Discontinuity Design Using Exact Date of Birth." Journal of Health Economics 30,4 (July 2011): 740-752.
3. Yörük, Ceren Ertan
Yörük, Baris K.
Alcohol Consumption and Risky Sexual Behavior Among Young Adults: Evidence from Minimum Legal Drinking Age Laws
Journal of Population Economics 28,1 (January 2015): 133-157.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00148-014-0520-1
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Contraception; Legislation; Sexual Activity; Sexual Behavior

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper exploits the discrete jump in alcohol consumption at the minimum legal drinking age (MLDA) in the USA and uses a regression discontinuity design to investigate the relationship between drinking and risky sexual behaviors among young adults. Using confidential data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (1997 Cohort), we document that young adults tend to drink up to 2.1 days more once they are granted legal access to alcohol at age 21. Although the discrete jump in alcohol consumption at the MLDA is associated with an increase in the probability of having sex by up to 7.8 percentage points, it does not have a significant impact on the probability of engaging in risky sexual behaviors among young adults. We also document that the effect of the MLDA on the probability of using several different birth control methods is not significant for those who had sex in the past 4 weeks. These results are robust under alternative specifications and imply that although the MLDA law is quite effective in reducing alcohol consumption among young adults, spillover effects of this law on risky sexual behaviors are relatively limited.
Bibliography Citation
Yörük, Ceren Ertan and Baris K. Yörük. "Alcohol Consumption and Risky Sexual Behavior Among Young Adults: Evidence from Minimum Legal Drinking Age Laws." Journal of Population Economics 28,1 (January 2015): 133-157.
4. Yörük, Ceren Ertan
Yörük, Baris K.
Do Minimum Legal Tobacco Purchase Age Laws Work?
Working Paper, Social Science Research Network, June 2014.
Also: http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2463595
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Social Science Electronic Publishing, Inc.
Keyword(s): Geocoded Data; Legislation; Smoking (see Cigarette Use)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper uses a regression discontinuity design to estimate the impact of the minimum legal tobacco purchase age (MLTPA) laws on smoking behavior among young adults. Using data from the confidential version of National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (1997 Cohort), which contains information on the exact birth date of the respondents, we find that the impact of the MLTPA on several indicators of smoking among youth is minor and often insignificant. However, we also show that granting legal access to cigarettes and tobacco products at the MLTPA leads to an increase in several indicators of smoking participation, including up to a 5 percentage point increase in the probability of smoking for males and for those who reported to have smoked before. These results are robust under several alternative model specifications and imply that policies that are designed to restrict youth access to tobacco are only effective in reducing smoking participation among certain groups of young adults.
Bibliography Citation
Yörük, Ceren Ertan and Baris K. Yörük. "Do Minimum Legal Tobacco Purchase Age Laws Work?" Working Paper, Social Science Research Network, June 2014.
5. Yörük, Ceren Ertan
Yörük, Baris K.
The Impact of Drinking on Psychological Well-Being: Evidence from Minimum Drinking Age Laws in the United States
Social Science and Medicine 75,10 (November 2012): 1844-1854.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0277953612005618
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Psychological Effects; Well-Being

In this paper, we investigate the relationship between alcohol consumption and psychological well-being among young adults in the United States. We do so by exploiting the discontinuity in alcohol consumption at age 21 and using a regression discontinuity design. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (1997 Cohort), we document that young adults tend to increase their alcohol consumption and drink on average 1.5 days per month more once they are granted legal access to alcohol at age 21. However, we also show that in general, this discrete jump in alcohol consumption at age 21 has no statistically significant impact on several indicators of psychological well-being among young adults. This result suggests that although stricter alcohol control targeted toward young adults may result in meaningful reductions in alcohol consumption, the immediate spillover effects of such policies on psychological well-being are relatively limited.
Bibliography Citation
Yörük, Ceren Ertan and Baris K. Yörük. "The Impact of Drinking on Psychological Well-Being: Evidence from Minimum Drinking Age Laws in the United States." Social Science and Medicine 75,10 (November 2012): 1844-1854.