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Source: PLOS ONE
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. Bernstein, Shayna
Rehkopf, David
Tuljapurkar, Shripad
Horvitz, Carol C.
Poverty Dynamics, Poverty Thresholds and Mortality: An Age-Stage Markovian Model
PLoS ONE published online (16 May 2018): DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0195734.
Also: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0195734
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: PLOS
Keyword(s): Health and Retirement Study (HRS); Mortality; Poverty

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Recent studies have examined the risk of poverty throughout the life course, but few have considered how transitioning in and out of poverty shape the dynamic heterogeneity and mortality disparities of a cohort at each age. Here we use state-by-age modeling to capture individual heterogeneity in crossing one of three different poverty thresholds...at each age. We examine age-specific state structure, the remaining life expectancy, its variance, and cohort simulations for those above and below each threshold. Survival and transitioning probabilities are statistically estimated by regression analyses of data from the Health and Retirement Survey RAND data-set, and the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. Using the results of these regression analyses, we parameterize discrete state, discrete age matrix models.
Bibliography Citation
Bernstein, Shayna, David Rehkopf, Shripad Tuljapurkar and Carol C. Horvitz. "Poverty Dynamics, Poverty Thresholds and Mortality: An Age-Stage Markovian Model." PLoS ONE published online (16 May 2018): DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0195734.
2. Devaraj, Srikant
Quigley, Narda R.
Patel, Pankaj C.
The Effects of Skin Tone, Height, and Gender on Earnings
PLOS ONE published online (2 January 2018): DOI: doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0190640.
Also: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0190640
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: PLOS
Keyword(s): Discrimination; Earnings; Gender Differences; Height; Physical Characteristics; Skin Tone

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using a theoretical approach grounded in implicit bias and stereotyping theories, this study examines the relationship between observable physical characteristics (skin tone, height, and gender) and earnings, as measured by income. Combining separate streams of research on the influence of these three characteristics, we draw from a sample of 31,356 individual-year observations across 4,340 individuals from the National Longitudinal Study of Youth (NLSY) 1997. We find that skin tone, height, and gender interact such that taller males with darker skin tone attain lower earnings; those educated beyond high school, endowed with higher cognitive ability, and at the higher income level (>75th percentile) had even lower levels of earnings relative to individuals with lighter skin tone. The findings have implications for implicit bias theories, stereotyping, and the human capital literature within the fields of management, applied psychology, and economics.
Bibliography Citation
Devaraj, Srikant, Narda R. Quigley and Pankaj C. Patel. "The Effects of Skin Tone, Height, and Gender on Earnings." PLOS ONE published online (2 January 2018): DOI: doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0190640.
3. Kamp Dush, Claire M.
Arocho, Rachel
Mernitz, Sara E.
Bartholomew, Kyle R.
The Intergenerational Transmission of Partnering
PLoS ONE published online (13 November 2018): DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0205732.
Also: https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0205732
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: PLOS
Keyword(s): Cohabitation; Divorce; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Marital Status; Modeling, Poisson (IRT–ZIP); Siblings

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

As divorce and cohabitation dissolution in the US have increased, partnering has expanded to the point that sociologists describe a merry-go-round of partners in American families. Could one driver of the increase in the number of partners be an intergenerational transmission of partnering? We discuss three theoretical perspectives on potential mechanisms that would underlie an intergenerational transmission of partnering: the transmission of economic hardship, the transmission of marriageable characteristics and relationship skills, and the transmission of relationship commitment. Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 Child and Young Adult study (NLSY79 CYA) and their mothers in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY79), we examined the intergenerational transmission of partnering, including both marital and cohabitating unions, using prospective measures of family and economic instability as well as exploiting sibling data to try to identify potential mechanisms. Even after controlling for maternal demographic characteristics and socioeconomic factors, the number of maternal partners was positively associated with offspring's number of partners. Hybrid sibling Poisson regression models that examined sibling differential experiences of maternal partners indicated that there were no differences between siblings who witnessed more or fewer maternal partners. Overall, results suggested that the transmission of poor marriageable characteristics and relationship skills from mother to child may warrant additional attention as a potential mechanism through which the number of partners continues across generations.
Bibliography Citation
Kamp Dush, Claire M., Rachel Arocho, Sara E. Mernitz and Kyle R. Bartholomew. "The Intergenerational Transmission of Partnering." PLoS ONE published online (13 November 2018): DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0205732.