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Author: Kuo, Janet Chen-Lan
Resulting in 6 citations.
1. Kuo, Janet Chen-Lan
Racial and Educational Disparities in Union Transitions of Cohabitors: The Importance of Long-term Economic Prospects
Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Sociology, University of Texas at Austin, 2015.
Also: https://repositories.lib.utexas.edu/handle/2152/31679
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: University of Texas at Austin
Keyword(s): Age at First Marriage; Cohabitation; Economic Well-Being; Educational Attainment; Marital History/Transitions; Racial Differences; Wealth

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The purpose of this dissertation is to provide a better understanding of the mechanisms that sustain the divergent patterns of union transition behavior among cohabitors of different socioeconomic backgrounds--broadly defined by race and education. First, it asks how racial and educational disparities in cohabitors' union transition behaviors have changed over time. Second, I explore how the first union formation processes based on a variety of indicators for young people's socioeconomic conditions vary between African Americans and non-Hispanic whites. Third, I investigate to what extent the educational disparities in the odds of transitioning to marriage could be attributed to differences in wealth as well as employment conditions among educational groups.
Bibliography Citation
Kuo, Janet Chen-Lan. Racial and Educational Disparities in Union Transitions of Cohabitors: The Importance of Long-term Economic Prospects. Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Sociology, University of Texas at Austin, 2015..
2. Kuo, Janet Chen-Lan
Racial Differences in First Union Formation
Presented: Seattle WA, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2016
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Childbearing, Premarital/Nonmarital; Cohabitation; Parents, Single; Racial Differences; Socioeconomic Factors

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using data from the 1997 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, this study explores how the first union formation processes based on a variety of indicators for young people's socioeconomic conditions vary between African Americans and non-Hispanic whites. Findings suggest that the process of entering cohabiting unions does differ between African Americans and non-Hispanic whites. That is, non-Hispanic whites who come from disadvantaged family backgrounds, in terms of low levels of parental incomes and education, and who have nonmarital births are more likely to enter cohabiting unions than to stay single, as compared with their non-Hispanic white peers with more advantaged backgrounds and those who have no children born outside of marriage. Yet, African Americans are significantly less likely to enter cohabiting unions and are more likely to stay single, as compared with similarly disadvantaged non-Hispanic whites. I then discuss how the findings on racial differences in the process of entering first unions can shed light on how racial and educational differences in cohabitation outcomes take shape among recent cohorts of cohabitors.
Bibliography Citation
Kuo, Janet Chen-Lan. "Racial Differences in First Union Formation." Presented: Seattle WA, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2016.
3. Kuo, Janet Chen-Lan
Raley, R. Kelly
Is It All About Money? Work Characteristics and Women’s and Men’s Marriage Formation in Early Adulthood
Journal of Family Issues 37,8 (June 2016): 1046-1073.
Also: http://jfi.sagepub.com/content/37/8/1046.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Control; Earnings; Family Formation; Marital Status; Marriage; Occupational Information Network (O*NET)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 97, this article investigates how work characteristics (earnings and autonomy) shape young adults' transition to first marriage separately for men and women. The results suggest that earnings are positively associated with marriage and that this association is as strong for women as men in their mid to late 20s. Additionally, occupational autonomy—having the control over one's own work structure—facilitates entry into first marriage for women in their mid to late 20s but, for men, occupational autonomy is not associated with marriage at these ages. These results suggest that even as women's earnings are increasingly important for marriage, other aspects of work are also important for stable family formation.
Bibliography Citation
Kuo, Janet Chen-Lan and R. Kelly Raley. "Is It All About Money? Work Characteristics and Women’s and Men’s Marriage Formation in Early Adulthood." Journal of Family Issues 37,8 (June 2016): 1046-1073.
4. McClendon, David
Kuo, Janet Chen-Lan
Raley, R. Kelly
Opportunities to Meet: Occupational Education and Marriage Formation in Young Adulthood
Demography 51,4 (August 2014): 1319-1344.
Also: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24980386
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Educational Attainment; Marriage; Modeling, Hazard/Event History/Survival/Duration; Occupational Information Network (O*NET); Occupations

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We focus on work--and the social ties that it supports--and consider whether the educational composition of occupations is important for marriage formation during young adulthood. Employing discrete-time event-history methods using the NLSY-97, we find that occupational education is positively associated with transitioning to first marriage and with marrying a college-educated partner for women but not for men.
Bibliography Citation
McClendon, David, Janet Chen-Lan Kuo and R. Kelly Raley. "Opportunities to Meet: Occupational Education and Marriage Formation in Young Adulthood." Demography 51,4 (August 2014): 1319-1344.
5. Yu, Wei-hsin
Kuo, Janet Chen-Lan
Occupational Gender Composition and Union Dissolution: Exploring the Relationship and Mechanisms
Presented: Austin TX, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2019
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Cohabitation; Gender; Marital Instability; Occupations, Female; Occupations, Male; Occupations, Non-Traditional; Unions

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Bibliography Citation
Yu, Wei-hsin and Janet Chen-Lan Kuo. "Occupational Gender Composition and Union Dissolution: Exploring the Relationship and Mechanisms." Presented: Austin TX, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2019.
6. Yu, Wei-hsin
Kuo, Janet Chen-Lan
The Motherhood Wage Penalty by Work Conditions: How Do Occupational Characteristics Hinder or Empower Mothers?
American Sociological Review 82,4 (August 2017): 744-769.
Also: http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0003122417712729
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Job Hazards; Maternal Employment; Motherhood; Occupations; Wage Gap; Wage Penalty/Career Penalty

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Mothers are shown to receive lower wages than childless women across industrial countries. Although research on mothers' wage disadvantage has noted that the extent of this disadvantage is not universal among mothers, it has paid relatively little attention to how the structural characteristics of jobs moderate the price women pay for motherhood. Using data from 16 waves of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth that began in 1997, we examine how the pay gap between mothers and non-mothers varies by occupational characteristics. Deriving hypotheses from three prominent explanations for the motherhood wage penalty--stressing work-family conflict and job performance, compensating differentials, and employer discrimination, respectively--we test whether this penalty changes with an occupation's exposure to hazardous conditions, schedule regularity, required on-the-job training, competitiveness, level of autonomy, and emphasis on teamwork. Results from fixed-effects models show that the wage reduction for each child is less in occupations with greater autonomy and lower teamwork requirements. Moreover, mothers encounter a smaller penalty when their occupations impose less competitive pressure. On the whole, these findings are consistent with the model focusing on job strain and work-family conflict, adding evidence to the importance of improving job conditions to alleviate work-family conflict.
Bibliography Citation
Yu, Wei-hsin and Janet Chen-Lan Kuo. "The Motherhood Wage Penalty by Work Conditions: How Do Occupational Characteristics Hinder or Empower Mothers?" American Sociological Review 82,4 (August 2017): 744-769.