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Author: Devaraj, Srikant
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Devaraj, Srikant
Patel, Pankaj C.
Skin Tone and Self-Employment: Is there an Intra-Group Variation among Blacks?
Review of Black Political Economy 44,1 (2017): 137-166.
Also: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12114-017-9249-x
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Black Studies; Self-Employed Workers; Skin Tone

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The purpose of this paper is to formally evaluate whether odds of entry into self-employment decrease as skin tone darkens for Blacks in the United States. Extending past work on inter-group differences in Black-White self-employment, based on data from National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997, with darker skin tone the odds of self-employment decline. Having spent more time in labor force further decreases the likelihood of self-employment for darker skin tone Blacks, and being a high-school graduate, scoring high on Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB), or higher past year income are not associated with self-employment of darker skin tone Blacks. While darker skin tone Blacks who are self-employed derive lower income, those who are self-employed and with more human capital (longer time spent in the labor force, scoring high on ASVAB or being a high school graduate) have a higher income.
Bibliography Citation
Devaraj, Srikant and Pankaj C. Patel. "Skin Tone and Self-Employment: Is there an Intra-Group Variation among Blacks?" Review of Black Political Economy 44,1 (2017): 137-166.
2. Devaraj, Srikant
Quigley, Narda R.
Patel, Pankaj C.
The Effects of Skin Tone, Height, and Gender on Earnings
PLOS ONE published online (2 January 2018): DOI: doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0190640.
Also: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0190640
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: PLOS
Keyword(s): Discrimination; Earnings; Gender Differences; Height; Physical Characteristics; Skin Tone

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using a theoretical approach grounded in implicit bias and stereotyping theories, this study examines the relationship between observable physical characteristics (skin tone, height, and gender) and earnings, as measured by income. Combining separate streams of research on the influence of these three characteristics, we draw from a sample of 31,356 individual-year observations across 4,340 individuals from the National Longitudinal Study of Youth (NLSY) 1997. We find that skin tone, height, and gender interact such that taller males with darker skin tone attain lower earnings; those educated beyond high school, endowed with higher cognitive ability, and at the higher income level (>75th percentile) had even lower levels of earnings relative to individuals with lighter skin tone. The findings have implications for implicit bias theories, stereotyping, and the human capital literature within the fields of management, applied psychology, and economics.
Bibliography Citation
Devaraj, Srikant, Narda R. Quigley and Pankaj C. Patel. "The Effects of Skin Tone, Height, and Gender on Earnings." PLOS ONE published online (2 January 2018): DOI: doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0190640.