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Author: Arocho, Rachel
Resulting in 4 citations.
1. Arocho, Rachel
Kamp Dush, Claire M.
Anticipating the "Ball and Chain"? Reciprocal Associations Between Marital Expectations and Delinquency
Journal of Marriage and Family 78,5 (October 2016): 1371-1381.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jomf.12328/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Delinquency/Gang Activity; Expectations/Intentions; Marriage; Modeling, Structural Equation

Marriage has been identified as a mechanism that may explain decreased delinquency among young adults, but whereas marriage is increasingly delayed, crime continues to decrease across the transition to adulthood. Most adolescents and young adults expect to marry one day, and these expectations may suppress delinquency. Conversely, increased delinquency may also predict decreased marital expectations. Longitudinal data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 cohort (N = 7,057), a sample of youth who were aged 12 to 17 years in 1997, were used to examine the reciprocal association between an expressed expectation to marry soon and participation in delinquent behavior. Results from an autoregressive cross-lagged structural equation model suggested that greater expectations to marry were significantly associated with less delinquent activity 1 year later. Greater delinquent activity was not significantly associated with subsequent marital expectations. Youth with the greatest expectations to marry may temper their behavior even before vows are taken.
Bibliography Citation
Arocho, Rachel and Claire M. Kamp Dush. "Anticipating the "Ball and Chain"? Reciprocal Associations Between Marital Expectations and Delinquency." Journal of Marriage and Family 78,5 (October 2016): 1371-1381.
2. Arocho, Rachel
Kamp Dush, Claire M.
Distant Horizons: Marital Expectations May Be Dampened by Economic Circumstances
Couple and Family Psychology: Research and Practice 7,1 (March 2018): 1-11.
Also: http://psycnet.apa.org/PsycARTICLES/journal/cfp/7/1
Cohort(s): NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: American Psychological Association (APA)
Keyword(s): Cohabitation; Educational Attainment; Expectations/Intentions; Marriage; Modeling, Structural Equation; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Many cohabitors desire to marry someday, though actual expectations for marriage, particularly for when one expects to marry, may change over time. Cohabitors' expectations could be shaped by the characteristics of their relationship and their current socioeconomic circumstances. However, expectations to be wed within a certain time frame could also encourage behaviors to make marriage more attainable, such as by taking steps to increase financial security or improve the relationship. The present study drew on marital horizon theory and the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1979 Child and Young Adult Cohort and used autoregressive cross-lagged structural equation models to examine reciprocal associations between cohabiting individuals' marital expectations, defined as years until they expected to marry, and relationship and socioeconomic characteristics. Cohabitors with greater education subsequently expected to marry sooner, and those who expected to marry later were subsequently more highly educated. Cohabitors with better educated partners also expected to marry sooner, as did cohabitors who were themselves employed full-time. Overall, results strengthened previous arguments for the importance of economic security for marriage, and extended these findings to suggest that even expectations for marriage may be hampered by poor socioeconomic status. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved)
Bibliography Citation
Arocho, Rachel and Claire M. Kamp Dush. "Distant Horizons: Marital Expectations May Be Dampened by Economic Circumstances." Couple and Family Psychology: Research and Practice 7,1 (March 2018): 1-11.
3. Arocho, Rachel
Kamp Dush, Claire M.
Like Mother, Like Child: Offspring Marital Timing Desires and Maternal Marriage Timing and Stability
Journal of Family Psychology 31,3 (April 2017): 261-272.
Also: http://psycnet.apa.org/psycinfo/2016-28689-001/
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: American Psychological Association (APA)
Keyword(s): Age at First Marriage; Expectations/Intentions; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Marital History/Transitions; Marital Stability; Marriage

Understanding the determinants of marital timing is critical because it has implications for marital functioning and divorce. One salient predictor of marital timing is youth's desires for marriage timing. To shine light on predictors of both desires for marital timing and the timing of marriage itself, we examine offspring marital desires and maternal marriage characteristics in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1979 (NLSY79) cohort and 1979 Child and Young Adult cohort (NLSY79-CYA; biological offspring of the women in the 1979 cohort). Analyses showed that maternal cohabitation postdivorce predicted decreased expectations to ever marry in offspring. Maternal age at marriage was positively associated with offspring desires for age at marriage, but only for those whose mothers had not divorced. Maternal marital age was significantly associated with the offspring's transition into marriage even when controlling for the offspring's desires for marriage timing, but neither maternal marriage age nor offspring desires for marital timing were associated with the timing of entrance into cohabitation, whereas maternal divorce was associated with earlier cohabitation. Our findings suggest that maternal marriage characteristics, particularly divorce, are significant predictors of millennials' desires for and experiences with romantic relationships. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)
Bibliography Citation
Arocho, Rachel and Claire M. Kamp Dush. "Like Mother, Like Child: Offspring Marital Timing Desires and Maternal Marriage Timing and Stability." Journal of Family Psychology 31,3 (April 2017): 261-272.
4. Kamp Dush, Claire M.
Arocho, Rachel
Mernitz, Sara E.
Bartholomew, Kyle R.
The Intergenerational Transmission of Partnering
PLoS ONE published online (13 November 2018): DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0205732.
Also: https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0205732
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: PLOS
Keyword(s): Cohabitation; Divorce; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Marital Status; Modeling, Poisson (IRT–ZIP); Siblings

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

As divorce and cohabitation dissolution in the US have increased, partnering has expanded to the point that sociologists describe a merry-go-round of partners in American families. Could one driver of the increase in the number of partners be an intergenerational transmission of partnering? We discuss three theoretical perspectives on potential mechanisms that would underlie an intergenerational transmission of partnering: the transmission of economic hardship, the transmission of marriageable characteristics and relationship skills, and the transmission of relationship commitment. Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 Child and Young Adult study (NLSY79 CYA) and their mothers in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY79), we examined the intergenerational transmission of partnering, including both marital and cohabitating unions, using prospective measures of family and economic instability as well as exploiting sibling data to try to identify potential mechanisms. Even after controlling for maternal demographic characteristics and socioeconomic factors, the number of maternal partners was positively associated with offspring's number of partners. Hybrid sibling Poisson regression models that examined sibling differential experiences of maternal partners indicated that there were no differences between siblings who witnessed more or fewer maternal partners. Overall, results suggested that the transmission of poor marriageable characteristics and relationship skills from mother to child may warrant additional attention as a potential mechanism through which the number of partners continues across generations.
Bibliography Citation
Kamp Dush, Claire M., Rachel Arocho, Sara E. Mernitz and Kyle R. Bartholomew. "The Intergenerational Transmission of Partnering." PLoS ONE published online (13 November 2018): DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0205732.