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Source: Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology
Resulting in 5 citations.
1. Baydar, Nazli
Reliability and Validity of Temperament Scales of the NLSY Child Assessments
Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology 16,3 (July-September 1995): 339-370.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0193397395900241
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Children; Children, Behavioral Development; Children, Preschool; Children, School-Age; Children, Temperament; Data Quality/Consistency; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Methods/Methodology; Motor and Social Development (MSD); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT); Preschool Children; Scale Construction; Temperament; Tests and Testing; Verbal Memory (McCarthy Scale)

This article presents an investigation of the psychometric properties of the temperament scales that measure the personality and social adjustment of children zero to 6 years old. These scales consist of a set of maternally and interviewer reported items available from the 1986, 1988, and 1990 NLSY administrations. Four temperament scales are presented: two scales for infants 6 to 23 months old and two scales for children 2 to 6 years old. Findings indicate that the internal reliability, the cross-sectional and longitudinal continuity of factor structures, are satisfactory. The stability of the factor structures across sociodemographic subgroups could not be supported. Some uses of the temperament scales are suggested that are expected to be robust to systematic measurement errors. A set of item coefficients is presented that may be used to construct temperament scale scores.
Bibliography Citation
Baydar, Nazli. "Reliability and Validity of Temperament Scales of the NLSY Child Assessments." Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology 16,3 (July-September 1995): 339-370.
2. Colder, Craig R.
Lengua, Liliana J.
Fite, Paula J.
Mott, Joshua Adam
Bush, Nicole R.
Temperament in Context: Infant Temperament Moderates the Relationship Between Perceived Neighborhood Quality and Behavior Problems
Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology 27,5 (September 2006): 456-467.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0193397306000803
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Behavior, Antisocial; Behavioral Problems; CESD (Depression Scale); Depression (see also CESD); Neighborhood Effects; Temperament

Hypotheses that positive affect and fear in infancy moderate later relationships between neighborhood quality and behavior problems were examined in a sample of children from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. Results suggested that poor neighborhood quality was associated with antisocial behavior at age 6 for children who in infancy were characterized by either high positive affect and low fear or by low positive affect and high fear. Depression/anxiety increased from age 6 to age 12 for children in poor quality neighborhoods who were characterized in infancy by low positive affect. A combination of low fear and high positive affect in infancy appeared to be protective, as it was associated with decreases in depression/anxiety during childhood. These findings suggest the utility of examining multiple dimensions of temperament and of integrating multiple levels of influence into moderational models to understand and prevent the development of childhood symptomatology.
Bibliography Citation
Colder, Craig R., Liliana J. Lengua, Paula J. Fite, Joshua Adam Mott and Nicole R. Bush. "Temperament in Context: Infant Temperament Moderates the Relationship Between Perceived Neighborhood Quality and Behavior Problems." Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology 27,5 (September 2006): 456-467.
3. Gardner, Margo
Martin, Anne
Petitclerc, Amelie
Mothers' Postsecondary Entry during Early Childhood: Short- and Long-term Effects on Children
Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology 62 (May-June 2019): 11-25.
Also: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0193397318300856
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Children, Academic Development; Education, Adult; Mothers, Education; Parental Influences; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading)

This study explored the implications of low-income mothers' entry into post-secondary education (PSE) during their children's first five years of life. Using propensity score matching to analyze data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth of 1979, we examined associations between maternal entry into PSE during early childhood and children's short- and long-term (ages 7 and 13, respectively) academic and socioemotional outcomes. We found that mothers' entry into PSE during early childhood had no short-term effects on children. There were, however, long-term positive effects on academic outcomes among children with a coresident father figure, and negative effects on behavior. We also tested explanatory mechanisms and found that maternal PSE entry had positive long-term effects on household income, but income did not mediate effects on long-term child outcomes. Further, maternal PSE had no effects on the home learning environment, mothers' educational expectations for children, maternal presence at home, or family climate.
Bibliography Citation
Gardner, Margo, Anne Martin and Amelie Petitclerc. "Mothers' Postsecondary Entry during Early Childhood: Short- and Long-term Effects on Children." Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology 62 (May-June 2019): 11-25.
4. Kim, Hyoshin
Baydar, Nazli
Greek, April A.
Testing Conditions Influence the Race Gap in Cognition and Achievement Estimated by Household Survey Data
Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology 23,5 (January 2003): 567-582.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0193397302001429
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Gender Differences; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT); Racial Differences; Racial Studies; Test Scores/Test theory/IRT; Testing Conditions

The present study investigates the hypothesis that the race gap estimated using achievement test scores administered during household surveys may partly be accounted for by measurable testing conditions such as interviewer characteristics, interviewer-child interactions, and the testing environment in the home. Using the child assessments of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) in 1992, the findings clearly indicate that the factors related to testing conditions in the home have significant effects on the test score gap between African American and White children of 6-9 years of age. The agreement between the race of the interviewer and the race of the child especially showed the positive effects on child test scores. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Kim, Hyoshin, Nazli Baydar and April A. Greek. "Testing Conditions Influence the Race Gap in Cognition and Achievement Estimated by Household Survey Data." Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology 23,5 (January 2003): 567-582.
5. Kuhfeld, Megan
Gershoff, Elizabeth Thompson
Paschall, Katherine W.
The Development of Racial/Ethnic and Socioeconomic Achievement Gaps during the School Years
Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology 57 (July-August 2018): 62-73.
Also: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S019339731730343X
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Children, Academic Development; Early Childhood Longitudinal Study (ECLS-B, ECLS-K); Ethnic Differences; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT); Poverty; Racial Differences; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Although a large body of research has documented racial/ethnic gaps in academic achievement at school entry, less is known about the interaction between race and poverty as achievement gaps develop. This study examined developmental trends in academic achievement gaps between poverty and race/ethnicity groups from school entry to middle school using two large longitudinal data sets. We used time-varying effect modeling (TVEM) to estimate how the associations among race/ethnicity, poverty status, and math and reading achievement vary across continuous age from age 5 to age 15. Poor White students consistently outperformed poor Black and poor Hispanic students, with gaps widening around ages 7-8. Furthermore, we found that within-group variation increased across time, which indicated that a standardized difference in later grades translates to a larger difference in knowledge in later grades. The results highlight the importance of studying race and poverty in interaction when measuring achievement gaps.
Bibliography Citation
Kuhfeld, Megan, Elizabeth Thompson Gershoff and Katherine W. Paschall. "The Development of Racial/Ethnic and Socioeconomic Achievement Gaps during the School Years." Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology 57 (July-August 2018): 62-73.