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Author: Greek, April A.
Resulting in 7 citations.
1. Baydar, Nazli
Greek, April A.
Analysis of Data from Related Individuals
Working Paper, Battelle Centers for Public Health Research and Evaluation, Seattle, WA, 2001
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Battelle Human Affairs Research Center
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Genetics; Kinship; Modeling; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading)

This study extends the basic genetic factor models designed for twin data to examine data coming from children who belong to kinship groups of varying size and structure. To the extent that the genetic factor models could be extended to samples that are non-selective or less-selective than twin samples, more accurate estimates of genetic and environmental contributions may be obtained. In handling of data from kinship groups of children, several methodological and substantive issues arise. In order to demonstrate the implications of different approaches to resolve these issues, the estimates of ten models were compared that differed due to sample and model specification. The data come from children age 6-12 years in the 1992 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth-Children (NLSY-C). Analyses of the Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT) for Reading Recognition and Behavior Problems Index (BPI) were conducted to estimate additive genetic and environmental components of variance. Results showed that estimates obtained from different methods of analysis varied substantially but were more robust for the PIAT scores than for the BPI scores. It was concluded that covariance structure models for kinship groups would make more efficient use of data from multiple related children than models for pairs of related children.
Bibliography Citation
Baydar, Nazli and April A. Greek. "Analysis of Data from Related Individuals." Working Paper, Battelle Centers for Public Health Research and Evaluation, Seattle, WA, 2001.
2. Baydar, Nazli
Greek, April A.
Externalizing and Internalizing Subscales of Behavior Problems Index
Working Paper, School of Nursing, University of Washington, Seattle WA, 2001
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: School of Nursing, University of Washington
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Modeling; Scale Construction

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The results of a psychometric analysis of the Behavior Problems Index (BPI), a short survey measure of socio-emotional adjustment of children 5-11 years old, were presented that identified internalizing and externalizing problem subscales. The BPI has been administered in a number of recent large, national family surveys, which used different definitions of the internalizing and externalizing scales. The analyses presented here were based on data from four national surveys. A new set of standardized externalizing and internalizing subscales were presented based on confirmatory factor analyses, reliability, and validity analyses. Internalizing and externalizing dimensions of maladjustment were correlated throughout childhood. The correlation of the proposed measures with other measures of socio-emotional adjustment were significant and in the expected direction. Analysis of the stability of the proposed internalizing and externalizing scores showed some predictability, but also substantial variation.
Bibliography Citation
Baydar, Nazli and April A. Greek. "Externalizing and Internalizing Subscales of Behavior Problems Index." Working Paper, School of Nursing, University of Washington, Seattle WA, 2001.
3. Baydar, Nazli
Greek, April A.
Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne
A Longitudinal Study of the Effects of the Birth of a Sibling During the First 6 Years of Life
Journal of Marriage and Family 59,4 (November 1997): 939-956.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/353794
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: National Council on Family Relations
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Behavioral Problems; Birth Order; Cognitive Development; Family Environment; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Income Dynamics/Shocks; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT); Peers/Peer influence/Peer relations; Poverty; Preschool Children; Self-Esteem; Self-Perception Profile for Children (SPPC); Siblings; Skills; Social Emotional Development

We investigate links among the birth of a new infant, changes in the family environment, changes in the relationship between the mother and an older child, and changes in an older child's cognitive and socioemotional development. We hypothesize that the effects of sibling birth are mediated in the associated changes in the family environment and changes in the interaction patterns of the family members. Data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth are used on a cohort of nonminority children between 6 and 23 months old. The birth of a sibling results in significant chances in the family environment. At the same rune, positive interactions with the older child diminish, especially if the birth interval is short, and the mother increasingly adopts controlling parenting styles. These changes result in lower levels of verbal development. About 2.5 years after the sibling birth, negative effects are detected on achievement and on socioemotional adjustment. Some positive effects of sibling birth also are done on verbal ability and peer relations.
Bibliography Citation
Baydar, Nazli, April A. Greek and Jeanne Brooks-Gunn. "A Longitudinal Study of the Effects of the Birth of a Sibling During the First 6 Years of Life." Journal of Marriage and Family 59,4 (November 1997): 939-956.
4. Baydar, Nazli
Greek, April A.
Gritz, R. Mark
Young Mothers' Time Spent at Work and Time Spent Caring for Children
Journal of Family and Economic Issues 20,1 (March 1999): 61-84.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/h367846g48770465/
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Plenum Publishing Corporation
Keyword(s): Child Care; Time Use; Work Hours

Investigated the association between the time a mother spends at work and in different child care activities, using data from 1,248 female participants in the 1981 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) who had children younger than 6 yrs old at the time of the study. The mothers who worked on the index day spent almost one hour less time in physical care, one-half hour less time in interactive care, and over two hours less time in passive supervision of their children. The effects of a set of predictors on time use at work, time use in physical care, interactive care, and passive supervision of children were estimated using a covariance structure model. When the effects of these predictors were controlled, the number of hours at work predicted: (1) a small reduction in time spent in interactive care, and (2) larger reductions in time spent in physical care and passive supervision. ((c) 1999 APA/PsycINFO, all rights reserved)
Bibliography Citation
Baydar, Nazli, April A. Greek and R. Mark Gritz. "Young Mothers' Time Spent at Work and Time Spent Caring for Children." Journal of Family and Economic Issues 20,1 (March 1999): 61-84.
5. Bobo, Janet Kay
Greek, April A.
Klepinger, Daniel H.
Herting, Jerald R.
Alcohol Use Trajectories in Two Cohorts of U.S. Women Aged 50 to 65 at Baseline
Journal of the American Geriatrics Society 58,12 (December 2010): 2375-2380.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1532-5415.2010.03180.x/abstract
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Health and Retirement Study (HRS); Women

To examine drinking trajectories followed by two cohorts of older women over 8 to 10 years of follow-up. Longitudinal analyses of two nationally representative cohorts using semiparametric group-based models weighted and adjusted for baseline age. Study data were obtained from detailed interviews conducted in the home or by telephone. One cohort included 5,231 women in the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) aged 50 to 65 in 1996; the other included 1,658 women in the National Longitudinal Survey (NLS) aged 50 to 65 in 1995. Both cohorts reported any recent drinking and average number of drinks per drinking day using similar but not identical questions. HRS women completed six interviews (one every other year) from 1996 to 2006. NLS women completed five interviews from 1995 to 2003. All trajectory models yielded similar results. For HRS women, four trajectory groups were observed in the model based on drinks per day: increasing drinkers (4.9% of cohort), infrequent and nondrinkers (61.8%), consistent drinkers (25.9%), and decreasing drinkers (7.4%). Corresponding NLS values from the drinks per day model were 8.8%, 61.4%, 21.2%, and 8.6%, respectively. In 2006, the average number of drinks per day for HRS women in the increasing drinker and consistent drinker trajectories was 1.31 and 1.59, respectively. In 2003, these values for NLS women were 0.99 and 1.38, respectively. Most women do not markedly change their drinking behavior after age 50, but some increase their alcohol use substantially, whereas others continue to exceed current recommendations. These findings underscore the importance of periodically asking older women about their drinking to assess, advise, and assist those who may be at risk for developing alcohol-related problems. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

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Bibliography Citation
Bobo, Janet Kay, April A. Greek, Daniel H. Klepinger and Jerald R. Herting. "Alcohol Use Trajectories in Two Cohorts of U.S. Women Aged 50 to 65 at Baseline." Journal of the American Geriatrics Society 58,12 (December 2010): 2375-2380.
6. Kim, Hyoshin
Baydar, Nazli
Greek, April A.
Testing Conditions Influence the Race Gap in Cognition and Achievement Estimated by Household Survey Data
Presented: Washington, DC, Population Association of America Meetings, March 2001
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Interviewer Characteristics; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT); Racial Differences; Testing Conditions

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The present study investigates the hypothesis that the estimated race gap in achievement test scores from household survey data may partly be accounted for by measurable testing conditions' interviewer characteristics, interviewer-child interactions, and the testing environment'in the home. Using the child assessments of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) in 1992, the findings clearly indicate that there are significant effects of the factors related to testing conditions in the home on the test score gap between African American and white children of 6-9 years of age. Especially, the agreement between the race of the interviewer and the race of the child showed the beneficial effects on child test scores.
Bibliography Citation
Kim, Hyoshin, Nazli Baydar and April A. Greek. "Testing Conditions Influence the Race Gap in Cognition and Achievement Estimated by Household Survey Data." Presented: Washington, DC, Population Association of America Meetings, March 2001.
7. Kim, Hyoshin
Baydar, Nazli
Greek, April A.
Testing Conditions Influence the Race Gap in Cognition and Achievement Estimated by Household Survey Data
Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology 23,5 (January 2003): 567-582.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0193397302001429
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Gender Differences; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT); Racial Differences; Racial Studies; Test Scores/Test theory/IRT; Testing Conditions

The present study investigates the hypothesis that the race gap estimated using achievement test scores administered during household surveys may partly be accounted for by measurable testing conditions such as interviewer characteristics, interviewer-child interactions, and the testing environment in the home. Using the child assessments of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) in 1992, the findings clearly indicate that the factors related to testing conditions in the home have significant effects on the test score gap between African American and White children of 6-9 years of age. The agreement between the race of the interviewer and the race of the child especially showed the positive effects on child test scores. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Kim, Hyoshin, Nazli Baydar and April A. Greek. "Testing Conditions Influence the Race Gap in Cognition and Achievement Estimated by Household Survey Data." Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology 23,5 (January 2003): 567-582.