Search Results

Author: Baydar, Nazli
Resulting in 18 citations.
1. Baydar, Nazli
Consequences for Children of Their Birth Planning Status
Family Planning Perspectives 27,6 (November-December, 1995): 228-234, 245.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2136174l
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Alan Guttmacher Institute
Keyword(s): Age at First Birth; Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Behavior; Birth Order; Birthweight; Body Parts Recognition; Child Development; Childbearing; Cognitive Development; Family Income; Family Studies; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Marital Status; Memory for Location; Motor and Social Development (MSD); Parenthood; Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT); Pregnancy and Pregnancy Outcomes; Temperament; Verbal Memory (McCarthy Scale); Wantedness

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Despite continuing high levels of unintended childbearing in the United States and its assumed negative consequences for children, surprisingly little research has examined its effects on children's cognitive, emotional and academic outcomes. With mistimed and unwanted births accounting for 39% of births to ever-married women aged 15-44 in 1988(1) and 67% of those to their never-married counterparts,(2) it is important to understand whether planning status is associated with developmental deficits in children. If such an association exists, then its sources must be investigated. Understanding the consequence of unintendedness will facilitate evaluations of preventive programs and remedial interventions, as well as facilitate assessments of the effects of ineffective contraceptive use and limited access to abortion services.
Bibliography Citation
Baydar, Nazli. "Consequences for Children of Their Birth Planning Status." Family Planning Perspectives 27,6 (November-December, 1995): 228-234, 245.
2. Baydar, Nazli
Reliability and Validity of Temperament Scales of the NLSY Child assessments
Working Paper, Seattle WA: Battelle Centers for Public Health Research and Evaluation, October 1993
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Battelle Human Affairs Research Center
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Children; Children, Behavioral Development; Children, Temperament; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Methods/Methodology; Motor and Social Development (MSD); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT); Scale Construction; Temperament; Verbal Memory (McCarthy Scale)

The child assessments of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth provide a unique source of information for studying cognitive and socio-emotional development longitudinally in a large national sample of children. This paper presents an investigation of the psychometric properties of the temperament scales that measure the personality and social adjustment of children aged 0-6. These scales consist of a set of maternally and interviewer reported items available from the 1986, 1988 and 1990 NLSY administrations. Four temperament scales are presented: two scales for infants aged 6-23 months, and two scales for children aged 2-6 years. Specifically, we investigate whether the temperament scales meet the following criteria: (1) A satisfactory level of internal reliability; (2) comparable factor structures between administrations for children at a given age; (3) comparable factor structures across ages at a given assessment; (4) comparable factor structures longitudinal ly as a cohort ages; (5) stable factor loadings of items across different socio-demographic subpopulations; (6) empirically supported construct validity; and, (7) empirically supported predictive validity. The internal reliability, the stability of the factor structures beyond age 3, construct validity and the predictive validity of the temperament scales were empirically supported. However, the stability of the factor structure across socio-demographic subgroups could not be supported. The implications of this finding is discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Baydar, Nazli. "Reliability and Validity of Temperament Scales of the NLSY Child assessments." Working Paper, Seattle WA: Battelle Centers for Public Health Research and Evaluation, October 1993.
3. Baydar, Nazli
Reliability and Validity of Temperament Scales of the NLSY Child Assessments
Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology 16,3 (July-September 1995): 339-370.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0193397395900241
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Children; Children, Behavioral Development; Children, Preschool; Children, School-Age; Children, Temperament; Data Quality/Consistency; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Methods/Methodology; Motor and Social Development (MSD); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT); Preschool Children; Scale Construction; Temperament; Tests and Testing; Verbal Memory (McCarthy Scale)

This article presents an investigation of the psychometric properties of the temperament scales that measure the personality and social adjustment of children zero to 6 years old. These scales consist of a set of maternally and interviewer reported items available from the 1986, 1988, and 1990 NLSY administrations. Four temperament scales are presented: two scales for infants 6 to 23 months old and two scales for children 2 to 6 years old. Findings indicate that the internal reliability, the cross-sectional and longitudinal continuity of factor structures, are satisfactory. The stability of the factor structures across sociodemographic subgroups could not be supported. Some uses of the temperament scales are suggested that are expected to be robust to systematic measurement errors. A set of item coefficients is presented that may be used to construct temperament scale scores.
Bibliography Citation
Baydar, Nazli. "Reliability and Validity of Temperament Scales of the NLSY Child Assessments." Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology 16,3 (July-September 1995): 339-370.
4. Baydar, Nazli
Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne
Dynamics of Child Support and its Consequences for Children
In: Child Support and Child Well-Being. I. Garfinkel, S. S. McLanahan and P. K. Robins, eds. Washington, DC: The Urban Institute Press, 1994
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Urban Institute
Keyword(s): Child Support; Children; Children, Academic Development; Children, Adjustment Problems; Children, Behavioral Development; Children, Home Environment; Fathers, Absence; Fathers, Involvement; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Maternal Employment; Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness; Parents, Non-Custodial; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT)

The focus of this paper is on children who are eligible for child support rather than the custodial parent who receives the payments and the non-custodial parent who makes the payments. The paper investigates (1) the patterns of receipt of child-support and (2) its impact on children. Child-support payments are examined from a child's point of view. First, the process of becoming eligible for child support and the process of receiving child support are examined. Next, whether child-support payments have observable beneficial effects on children's well-being is examined. The study of the process of child-support receipt shows the extent of pre-existing differences between the children receiving child support payments and children who are eligible but not receiving child support payments. In the study of the effects of child support on children's developmental outcomes, a model that will statistically control for these pre-existing differences to the extent possible is developed. Although the data do not allow us to fully identify the factors that might mediate the effects of child support on child outcomes, an effort is made to account for likely mediators of these effects, such as mother's working hours, the quality of the home environment, and the frequency of contact with the father.
Bibliography Citation
Baydar, Nazli and Jeanne Brooks-Gunn. "Dynamics of Child Support and its Consequences for Children" In: Child Support and Child Well-Being. I. Garfinkel, S. S. McLanahan and P. K. Robins, eds. Washington, DC: The Urban Institute Press, 1994
5. Baydar, Nazli
Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne
Effects of Maternal Employment and Child Care Arrangements in Infancy on Preschoolers' Cognitive and Behavioral Outcomes
Developmental Psychology 27,6 (November 1991): 932-945.
Also: http://psycnet.apa.org/journals/dev/27/6/932/
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: American Psychological Association (APA)
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Child Care; Child Development; Children, Academic Development; Children, Behavioral Development; General Assessment; Maternal Employment; Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT)

The intersection of maternal employment and child care in the first three years of life is considered with respect to its effects on cognitive and behavioral outcomes in preschool children from the Children of the NLSY. Three sets of questions are addressed relating to the effects of maternal employment in the first three years, the effects of continuity, intensity and timing of employment in the first year, and the effects of different types of child-care arrangements over and above the expected maternal employment effect. The PPVT-R and BPI scores of 572 white children who were three and four years old were examined. Employment effects on children were considered in the early years of life. For children of employed mothers, babysitter care, grandmother care, and mother care in the first year of life were associated with lower BPI scores than father care. The beneficial effects of babysitter or grandmother care were stronger for girls than for boys, and the effects of maternal care were found for boys but not for girls. Grandmother and mother care during the first year were associated with higher PPVT-R scores for children in poverty and for boys. Reasons for the greater sensitivity in boys and children in poverty to child care type are discussed and several methodological issues considered.
Bibliography Citation
Baydar, Nazli and Jeanne Brooks-Gunn. "Effects of Maternal Employment and Child Care Arrangements in Infancy on Preschoolers' Cognitive and Behavioral Outcomes." Developmental Psychology 27,6 (November 1991): 932-945.
6. Baydar, Nazli
Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne
Effects of Maternal Employment and Child-Care Arrangements in Infancy on Preschoolers' Cognitive and Behavioral Outcomes: Evidence from the Children of the NLSY
Working Paper, Seattle WA: Battelle Human Affairs Research Center, January 1991
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Battelle Human Affairs Research Center
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Child Care; Child Development; Children, Academic Development; Children, Behavioral Development; General Assessment; Maternal Employment; Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT)

Bibliography Citation
Baydar, Nazli and Jeanne Brooks-Gunn. "Effects of Maternal Employment and Child-Care Arrangements in Infancy on Preschoolers' Cognitive and Behavioral Outcomes: Evidence from the Children of the NLSY." Working Paper, Seattle WA: Battelle Human Affairs Research Center, January 1991.
7. Baydar, Nazli
Grady, William R.
Predictors of Birth Planning Status and Its Consequences for Children
Presented: Cincinnati, OH, Population Association of America Meetings, April 1993
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Child Development; Childbearing; Children; Children, Behavioral Development; Cognitive Development; Fertility; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Wantedness

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper investigates the predictors of having a wanted, mistimed or unwanted birth, and the consequences of birth planning status on children's developmental status. Whether an unintended birth is "unwanted" or "mistimed" is determined by: 1) the costs of the birth; and, 2) whether those costs are fixed or transitory. When the costs of a birth are high and fixed, all future births would be "unwanted". The analysis is based on data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY). Since 1982, pregnancy history and planning status information was obtained from all NLSY women on an annual basis. Planning status questions were asked of the mothers on the average at the fifth month of the pregnancy, and the status of 84% of children were recorded before their birth. Our target group of children consists of all children born between 1982 and 1984 NLSY surveys. Two child developmental outcomes are considered: Behavioral-emotional development and cognitive development.
Bibliography Citation
Baydar, Nazli and William R. Grady. "Predictors of Birth Planning Status and Its Consequences for Children." Presented: Cincinnati, OH, Population Association of America Meetings, April 1993.
8. Baydar, Nazli
Greek, April A.
Analysis of Data from Related Individuals
Working Paper, Battelle Centers for Public Health Research and Evaluation, Seattle, WA, 2001
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Battelle Human Affairs Research Center
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Genetics; Kinship; Modeling; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading)

This study extends the basic genetic factor models designed for twin data to examine data coming from children who belong to kinship groups of varying size and structure. To the extent that the genetic factor models could be extended to samples that are non-selective or less-selective than twin samples, more accurate estimates of genetic and environmental contributions may be obtained. In handling of data from kinship groups of children, several methodological and substantive issues arise. In order to demonstrate the implications of different approaches to resolve these issues, the estimates of ten models were compared that differed due to sample and model specification. The data come from children age 6-12 years in the 1992 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth-Children (NLSY-C). Analyses of the Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT) for Reading Recognition and Behavior Problems Index (BPI) were conducted to estimate additive genetic and environmental components of variance. Results showed that estimates obtained from different methods of analysis varied substantially but were more robust for the PIAT scores than for the BPI scores. It was concluded that covariance structure models for kinship groups would make more efficient use of data from multiple related children than models for pairs of related children.
Bibliography Citation
Baydar, Nazli and April A. Greek. "Analysis of Data from Related Individuals." Working Paper, Battelle Centers for Public Health Research and Evaluation, Seattle, WA, 2001.
9. Baydar, Nazli
Greek, April A.
Externalizing and Internalizing Subscales of Behavior Problems Index
Working Paper, School of Nursing, University of Washington, Seattle WA, 2001
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: School of Nursing, University of Washington
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Modeling; Scale Construction

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The results of a psychometric analysis of the Behavior Problems Index (BPI), a short survey measure of socio-emotional adjustment of children 5-11 years old, were presented that identified internalizing and externalizing problem subscales. The BPI has been administered in a number of recent large, national family surveys, which used different definitions of the internalizing and externalizing scales. The analyses presented here were based on data from four national surveys. A new set of standardized externalizing and internalizing subscales were presented based on confirmatory factor analyses, reliability, and validity analyses. Internalizing and externalizing dimensions of maladjustment were correlated throughout childhood. The correlation of the proposed measures with other measures of socio-emotional adjustment were significant and in the expected direction. Analysis of the stability of the proposed internalizing and externalizing scores showed some predictability, but also substantial variation.
Bibliography Citation
Baydar, Nazli and April A. Greek. "Externalizing and Internalizing Subscales of Behavior Problems Index." Working Paper, School of Nursing, University of Washington, Seattle WA, 2001.
10. Baydar, Nazli
Greek, April A.
Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne
A Longitudinal Study of the Effects of the Birth of a Sibling During the First 6 Years of Life
Journal of Marriage and Family 59,4 (November 1997): 939-956.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/353794
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: National Council on Family Relations
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Behavioral Problems; Birth Order; Cognitive Development; Family Environment; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Income Dynamics/Shocks; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT); Peers/Peer influence/Peer relations; Poverty; Preschool Children; Self-Esteem; Self-Perception Profile for Children (SPPC); Siblings; Skills; Social Emotional Development

We investigate links among the birth of a new infant, changes in the family environment, changes in the relationship between the mother and an older child, and changes in an older child's cognitive and socioemotional development. We hypothesize that the effects of sibling birth are mediated in the associated changes in the family environment and changes in the interaction patterns of the family members. Data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth are used on a cohort of nonminority children between 6 and 23 months old. The birth of a sibling results in significant chances in the family environment. At the same rune, positive interactions with the older child diminish, especially if the birth interval is short, and the mother increasingly adopts controlling parenting styles. These changes result in lower levels of verbal development. About 2.5 years after the sibling birth, negative effects are detected on achievement and on socioemotional adjustment. Some positive effects of sibling birth also are done on verbal ability and peer relations.
Bibliography Citation
Baydar, Nazli, April A. Greek and Jeanne Brooks-Gunn. "A Longitudinal Study of the Effects of the Birth of a Sibling During the First 6 Years of Life." Journal of Marriage and Family 59,4 (November 1997): 939-956.
11. Baydar, Nazli
Greek, April A.
Gritz, R. Mark
Young Mothers' Time Spent at Work and Time Spent Caring for Children
Journal of Family and Economic Issues 20,1 (March 1999): 61-84.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/h367846g48770465/
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Plenum Publishing Corporation
Keyword(s): Child Care; Time Use; Work Hours

Investigated the association between the time a mother spends at work and in different child care activities, using data from 1,248 female participants in the 1981 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) who had children younger than 6 yrs old at the time of the study. The mothers who worked on the index day spent almost one hour less time in physical care, one-half hour less time in interactive care, and over two hours less time in passive supervision of their children. The effects of a set of predictors on time use at work, time use in physical care, interactive care, and passive supervision of children were estimated using a covariance structure model. When the effects of these predictors were controlled, the number of hours at work predicted: (1) a small reduction in time spent in interactive care, and (2) larger reductions in time spent in physical care and passive supervision. ((c) 1999 APA/PsycINFO, all rights reserved)
Bibliography Citation
Baydar, Nazli, April A. Greek and R. Mark Gritz. "Young Mothers' Time Spent at Work and Time Spent Caring for Children." Journal of Family and Economic Issues 20,1 (March 1999): 61-84.
12. Baydar, Nazli
Hyle , Patricia
Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne
A Longitudinal Study of the Effects of the Birth of a Sibling During Preschool and Early Grade School Years
Journal of Marriage and Family 59,4 (November 1997): 957-965.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/353795
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: National Council on Family Relations
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Behavioral Problems; Birth Order; Family Environment; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Mothers, Education; Preschool Children; Self-Esteem; Self-Perception; Self-Perception Profile for Children (SPPC); Siblings

This study investigates the changes in socio-emotional development, achievement, and self-concept after the birth of a sibling in a cohort of preschool-aged children over a 2-year period and a 4-year period. We test whether the birth of a sibling is associated with changes in the family environment and in children's developmental trajectories. We use data from nonminority children of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. The birth of a sibling is associated with a significant increase in the behavior problems of the children, but these increases are temporary. The birth of a sibling also is associated with lower reading recognition scores among economically disadvantaged children. The impact of the birth of a sibling on self-perception is large and negative, and this effect is stronger among the children of economically disadvantaged families.
Bibliography Citation
Baydar, Nazli, Patricia Hyle and Jeanne Brooks-Gunn. "A Longitudinal Study of the Effects of the Birth of a Sibling During Preschool and Early Grade School Years." Journal of Marriage and Family 59,4 (November 1997): 957-965.
13. Baydar, Nazli
Paikoff, Roberta L.
Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne
Effects of Childcare Arrangements on Cognitive and Behavioral Outcomes: Evidence from a National Sample of 3-4 Year Olds
Unpublished Manuscript, Seattle WA: Battelle Human Affairs Research Center, 1990
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Battelle Human Affairs Research Center
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Child Care; General Assessment; Maternal Employment; Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT)

Bibliography Citation
Baydar, Nazli, Roberta L. Paikoff and Jeanne Brooks-Gunn. "Effects of Childcare Arrangements on Cognitive and Behavioral Outcomes: Evidence from a National Sample of 3-4 Year Olds." Unpublished Manuscript, Seattle WA: Battelle Human Affairs Research Center, 1990.
14. Baydar, Nazli
Slusher, Chuck
Charng, Hong-Wen
Gritz, R. Mark
Mom's Money or Dad's Money: Resources Provided to Children
Presented: New York, NY, Population Association of America, March 1999
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Children; Income; Maternal Employment; Variables, Instrumental

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The association between income and the resources provided to children was investigated. In particular, the income from different sources was hypothesized to have different effects on the stimulation resources that mothers provided to their children. An important problem in estimating the effects of income from different sources on investments in children is that the decisions regarding investments in children and sources of income in the household may have some common unobserved determinants. In order to address this issue a two-stage estimation method was used, where a set of instrumental variables helped identify the effects of maternal employment, maternal earning, paternal earnings, unearned income, and income from public assistance programs on stimulation resources. Data from 6- to 9-year-old Children of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) were used. The results indicate differences in the effects of income from different sources on stimulation resources. Paternal earnings had a positive and significant effect on stimulation resources in families of all race/ethnicity groups. Maternal earnings did not have a significant effect on stimulation resources. Welfare income had a negative effect on stimulation resources in white families only. The results indicate that contribution to family income may not be strongly associated with control over resources allocation practices and underscore importance of studying household money management practices directly.
Bibliography Citation
Baydar, Nazli, Chuck Slusher, Hong-Wen Charng and R. Mark Gritz. "Mom's Money or Dad's Money: Resources Provided to Children." Presented: New York, NY, Population Association of America, March 1999.
15. Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne
Baydar, Nazli
Effects of Child-Care Arrangements on Cognitive and Behavioral Outcomes in 3- and 4-Year-Olds: Evidence from the Children of the NLSY
Presented: Seattle, WA, Biennial Meetings of the Society for Research in Child Development, April 1991
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD)
Keyword(s): Child Care; Child Development; Children, Academic Development; Children, Behavioral Development; General Assessment; Maternal Employment; Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT); Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Effects of early childhood care experience using data from the Children of the NLSY are examined, focusing on patterns of child care over the first three years of life and their effects on black and white and poor and non-poor 3- and 4-year olds. Child verbal ability (PPVT-R) was associated with early child-care arrangements for white children living in poverty, such that: (1) grandmother care was the optimal form of early care; (2) care by relatives other than mothers and grandmothers exerts a negative effect; (3) the transition to center-based care in the second year of life was negative, compared to grandmother or mother care; and (4) the transition to center-based care in the third year was not negative. Small but significant maternal employment effects are seen for employment in the first but not the second or third years of the child's life. For employed mothers, type of child care used in the first, but not the second and third years of life, is associated with PPVT-R scores.
Bibliography Citation
Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne and Nazli Baydar. "Effects of Child-Care Arrangements on Cognitive and Behavioral Outcomes in 3- and 4-Year-Olds: Evidence from the Children of the NLSY." Presented: Seattle, WA, Biennial Meetings of the Society for Research in Child Development, April 1991.
16. Herting, Jerald R.
Baydar, Nazli
Role of Early Childhood Behavior Problems and Initiating Gateway Substance Use
Presented: San Francisco, CA, American Society of Criminology Conference, November 2000
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: American Society of Criminology
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Children, Behavioral Development; Modeling, Growth Curve/Latent Trajectory Analysis; Peers/Peer influence/Peer relations; Substance Use

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The paper will use data from the Children of the National Longitudinal Study of Young Women to examine longitudinal patterns in initiating substance use and the role early childhood problems (e.g., ADHD, conduct disorder) pay in this process. Patterns of initiating can be observed from approximately age 10 to 18 with assessments of early childhood behaviors prior to age 10. problems can be juxtaposed against maternal behavior, school behaviors, peer association and other social indicators for individual and family. Latent growth models are used to model the patterns and associations among variables.
Bibliography Citation
Herting, Jerald R. and Nazli Baydar. "Role of Early Childhood Behavior Problems and Initiating Gateway Substance Use." Presented: San Francisco, CA, American Society of Criminology Conference, November 2000.
17. Kim, Hyoshin
Baydar, Nazli
Greek, April A.
Testing Conditions Influence the Race Gap in Cognition and Achievement Estimated by Household Survey Data
Presented: Washington, DC, Population Association of America Meetings, March 2001
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Interviewer Characteristics; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT); Racial Differences; Testing Conditions

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The present study investigates the hypothesis that the estimated race gap in achievement test scores from household survey data may partly be accounted for by measurable testing conditions' interviewer characteristics, interviewer-child interactions, and the testing environment'in the home. Using the child assessments of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) in 1992, the findings clearly indicate that there are significant effects of the factors related to testing conditions in the home on the test score gap between African American and white children of 6-9 years of age. Especially, the agreement between the race of the interviewer and the race of the child showed the beneficial effects on child test scores.
Bibliography Citation
Kim, Hyoshin, Nazli Baydar and April A. Greek. "Testing Conditions Influence the Race Gap in Cognition and Achievement Estimated by Household Survey Data." Presented: Washington, DC, Population Association of America Meetings, March 2001.
18. Kim, Hyoshin
Baydar, Nazli
Greek, April A.
Testing Conditions Influence the Race Gap in Cognition and Achievement Estimated by Household Survey Data
Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology 23,5 (January 2003): 567-582.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0193397302001429
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Gender Differences; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT); Racial Differences; Racial Studies; Test Scores/Test theory/IRT; Testing Conditions

The present study investigates the hypothesis that the race gap estimated using achievement test scores administered during household surveys may partly be accounted for by measurable testing conditions such as interviewer characteristics, interviewer-child interactions, and the testing environment in the home. Using the child assessments of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) in 1992, the findings clearly indicate that the factors related to testing conditions in the home have significant effects on the test score gap between African American and White children of 6-9 years of age. The agreement between the race of the interviewer and the race of the child especially showed the positive effects on child test scores. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Kim, Hyoshin, Nazli Baydar and April A. Greek. "Testing Conditions Influence the Race Gap in Cognition and Achievement Estimated by Household Survey Data." Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology 23,5 (January 2003): 567-582.