Search Results

Author: Mott, Joshua Adam
Resulting in 12 citations.
1. Colder, Craig R.
Lengua, Liliana J.
Fite, Paula J.
Mott, Joshua Adam
Bush, Nicole R.
Temperament in Context: Infant Temperament Moderates the Relationship Between Perceived Neighborhood Quality and Behavior Problems
Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology 27,5 (September 2006): 456-467.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0193397306000803
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Behavior, Antisocial; Behavioral Problems; CESD (Depression Scale); Depression (see also CESD); Neighborhood Effects; Temperament

Hypotheses that positive affect and fear in infancy moderate later relationships between neighborhood quality and behavior problems were examined in a sample of children from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. Results suggested that poor neighborhood quality was associated with antisocial behavior at age 6 for children who in infancy were characterized by either high positive affect and low fear or by low positive affect and high fear. Depression/anxiety increased from age 6 to age 12 for children in poor quality neighborhoods who were characterized in infancy by low positive affect. A combination of low fear and high positive affect in infancy appeared to be protective, as it was associated with decreases in depression/anxiety during childhood. These findings suggest the utility of examining multiple dimensions of temperament and of integrating multiple levels of influence into moderational models to understand and prevent the development of childhood symptomatology.
Bibliography Citation
Colder, Craig R., Liliana J. Lengua, Paula J. Fite, Joshua Adam Mott and Nicole R. Bush. "Temperament in Context: Infant Temperament Moderates the Relationship Between Perceived Neighborhood Quality and Behavior Problems." Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology 27,5 (September 2006): 456-467.
2. Colder, Craig R.
Mott, Joshua Adam
Berman, Arielle S.
Interactive Effects of Infant Activity Level and Fear on Growth Trajectories of Early Childhood Symptomatology
Presented: New Orleans, LA, Seventh Annual Meeting of the Society for Prevention Research, June 1999
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Society for Prevention Research
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Child Health; Temperament

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Bibliography Citation
Colder, Craig R., Joshua Adam Mott and Arielle S. Berman. "Interactive Effects of Infant Activity Level and Fear on Growth Trajectories of Early Childhood Symptomatology." Presented: New Orleans, LA, Seventh Annual Meeting of the Society for Prevention Research, June 1999.
3. Colder, Craig R.
Mott, Joshua Adam
Berman, Arielle S.
The Interactive Effects of Infant Activity Level and Fear on Growth Trajectories of Early Childhood Behavior Problems
Development and Psychopathology 14,1 (Winter 2002): 1-23.
Also: http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=100919&fulltextType=RA&fileId=S0954579402001013
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Child Health; Depression (see also CESD); Gender Differences; Growth Curves; Temperament

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The current study examined the interactive effects of infant activity level and fear on growth trajectories of behavior problems in early childhood (age 4 to 8 years) using maternal ratings. The sample was drawn from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) and included children who were between 1 and 11 months in 1986. Findings suggested that boys characterized by high activity level and low levels of fear in infancy escalated in both externalizing and internalizing symptoms. Also, boys characterized by high fear and low activity level increased in internalizing symptoms and these effects seemed to be specific to depression rather than anxiety. Temperament did not predict escalation in externalizing symptomatology for girls, but low levels of fear predicted increases in internalizing symptoms. There was also evidence for a decline in depression specific symptoms for girls characterized by high fear and low activity in infancy. These findings suggest the importance of examining interactive models of temperament risk and considering gender specific pathways to behavior problems. Copyright ? 2002 Cambridge University Press.
Bibliography Citation
Colder, Craig R., Joshua Adam Mott and Arielle S. Berman. "The Interactive Effects of Infant Activity Level and Fear on Growth Trajectories of Early Childhood Behavior Problems." Development and Psychopathology 14,1 (Winter 2002): 1-23.
4. Johnson, Timothy P.
Mott, Joshua Adam
The Reliability of Self-Reported Age of Onset of Tobacco, Alcohol and Illicit Drug Use
Addiction 96,8 (August 2001): 1187-1198.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1046/j.1360-0443.2001.968118711.x/abstract
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Addiction; Alcohol Use; Cigarette Use (see Smoking); Drug Use; Educational Status; Epidemiology; Gender Differences; Health Factors; Longitudinal Data Sets; Racial Differences; Substance Use

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

AIMS: To examine the reliability of self-reported age of first substance use experiences among national samples of adult and child respondents. DESIGN: Survey responses from seven waves of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) were examined. PARTICIPANTS: Adult and child NLSY respondents reporting age of first tobacco, alcohol, marijuana, cocaine and/or crack use during two or more survey interviews. MEASUREMENTS: Four indicators of reliability: intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC), mean and absolute mean differences in reported age and reports consistent within 1 year. FINDINGS: The adjusted mean ICC for all comparisons was 0.69. The adjusted mean difference in self-reported age of first substance use was -0.52 years and the adjusted absolute mean difference was 2.00 years. The adjusted percentage of all comparisons reporting ages consistent within 1 year was 55.28%. More consistent reports were provided by adults, and in response to questions posed over 2 years as opposed to longer time intervals. Respondent answers to questions concerned with first use of marijuana were generally found to be most reliable; questions concerned with first use of crack were least reliable and reports of tobacco, alcohol and cocaine were intermediate. Logistic regression analyses also identified age, race, gender, education and poverty status as predictors of consistent reporting. CONCLUSIONS: Self-reports of age of first substance use experiences, as currently collected via survey questionnaires, are of sufficient reliability for most current epidemiological applications. For inquiries where age of substance use onset is itself a research focus, however, researchers should invest additional effort in improving the reliability of measurement.
Bibliography Citation
Johnson, Timothy P. and Joshua Adam Mott. "The Reliability of Self-Reported Age of Onset of Tobacco, Alcohol and Illicit Drug Use." Addiction 96,8 (August 2001): 1187-1198.
5. Johnson, Timothy P.
Mott, Joshua Adam
The Reliability of Self-Reported Age of Onset of Tobacco, Alcohol, and Illicit Drug Use
Working Paper, Survey Research Laboratory and Health Research and Policy Center, November 2000
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Survey Research Laboratory, University of Illinois Chicago
Keyword(s): Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS); Data Quality/Consistency; Methods/Methodology; Substance Use

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

AIMS: To examine the reliability of self-reported age of first substance use experiences among national samples of adult and child respondents. DESIGN: Survey responses from seven waves of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) were examined. PARTICIPANTS: Adult and child NLSY respondents reporting age of first tobacco, alcohol, marijuana, cocaine and/or crack use during two or more survey interviews. MEASURMENTS: Four indicators of reliability: intraclass correlation coeffcients (ICC), mean and absolute mean differences in reported age, and reports consistent within one year. FINDINGS: The adjusted mean ICC for all comparison was 0.69. The adjusted mean difference in self-reported age of first substance use was -0.52 years and the adjusted absolute mean difference was 2.00 years. The adjusted percent of all comparisons reporting ages consistent within one year was 55.28%. More consistent reports were provided by adults, and in response to questions posed over 2 year as opposed to longer intervals. Respondent answers to questions concerned with first use of marijuana were generally found to be most reliabel; questions concerned with first use of crack were least reliable and reports of tobacco, alcohol and cocaine were intermediate. Logistic regression analyses also identified age, race, gender, edication, and poverty status as predictors of consistent reporting. CONCLUSIONS: Self-reports age of first substance use experiences, as currently collected via survey questionnaires, are of sufficient reliability for most current epidemiologic applications. For inquiries where age of substance use onset is itself a research focus, however, researchers should invest additional effort in improving the reliability of measurement.
Bibliography Citation
Johnson, Timothy P. and Joshua Adam Mott. "The Reliability of Self-Reported Age of Onset of Tobacco, Alcohol, and Illicit Drug Use." Working Paper, Survey Research Laboratory and Health Research and Policy Center, November 2000.
6. Mannino, David M.
Mott, Joshua Adam
Ferdinands, Jill M.
Camargo, Carlos A.
Friedman, Michael S.
Greves, H.M.
Redd, Stephen C.
Boys with High Body Masses Have an Increased Risk of Developing Asthma: Findings from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY)
International Journal of Obesity 30,1 (January 2006): 6-13.
Also: http://www.nature.com/ijo/journal/v30/n1/abs/0803145a.html
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Stockton Press
Keyword(s): Asthma; Body Mass Index (BMI); Cigarette Use (see Smoking); Ethnic Differences; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Obesity; Poverty; Racial Differences; Smoking (see Cigarette Use); Weight

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objective: To determine the relation between body mass index and the development of asthma in children.

Design: Prospective study of 4393 asthma-free children followed for up to 14 years.

Setting: Children of participants in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth.

Methods: Analysis was limited to children who were followed from birth and were asthma-free during the first 24 months of life. The outcome was the development of asthma during follow-up (incident asthma). Body mass index (BMI) was our main predictor of interest. Survival analyses, using time to development of asthma as the main endpoint, were stratified by sex and controlled for race/ethnicity, poverty status, and prenatal maternal smoking.

Results: Asthma developed in 218 (5.0 %) children during the follow-up period. The relation between BMI and incident asthma varied by sex. A BMI >=85th percentile at age 2-3 years was a risk factor for subsequent asthma development in boys (hazard ratio (HR) 1.6 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1, 2.4) but not girls (HR 0.8, 95% CI 0.5, 1.4). Similarly, boys with BMIs always >=85th percentile were at increased risk for subsequent asthma development (HR 2.4, 95% CI 1.4, 4.4) but not girls (HR 1.5, 95% CI 0.7, 2.9).

Conclusion: Boys with high body masses may be at an increased risk for developing asthma. International Journal of Obesity (2006) 30, 6-13. doi:10.1038/sj.ijo.0803145 [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

Bibliography Citation
Mannino, David M., Joshua Adam Mott, Jill M. Ferdinands, Carlos A. Camargo, Michael S. Friedman, H.M. Greves and Stephen C. Redd. "Boys with High Body Masses Have an Increased Risk of Developing Asthma: Findings from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY)." International Journal of Obesity 30,1 (January 2006): 6-13.
7. Mott, Joshua Adam
Familial and Behavioral Antecedents of Children's Injuries
Ph.D. Dissertation, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1996
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: UMI - University Microfilms, Bell and Howell Information and Learning
Keyword(s): Accidents; Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Child Health; Children, Health Care; Children, Home Environment; Children, Well-Being; Event History; Family Environment; Family Influences; Gender Differences; Home Environment; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Injuries; Job Satisfaction; Modeling; Mothers, Behavior; Mothers, Health; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

This research uses a national longitudinal sample of children (the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth) to make two new contributions to our understanding of the antecedents of children's injuries. First, it employs path analysis to examine both family and behavioral influences on injuries, factors which have previously been analyzed separately, within the context of each other. Second, it employs event-history techniques to identify risk factors that may operate only at specific ages in childhood. Measures of the dependent variable are based on retrospective maternal reports. Injuries requiring any medical attention (including hospitalization) and those requiring hospitalization were analyzed separately. Family environmental variables tap issues of family structure, socio-economic status and maternal job satisfaction, the quality of parent-child interaction, the home physical environment, maternal health and maternal behaviors prior to the birth of the child. Children's externalizing, injury-related, behaviors are measured using the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL). This study finds that, especially in middle childhood, externalizing behaviors were predictive of children's injuries. Externalizing behavior played a stronger role in the etiologyof boys' injuries than girls' injuries, confirming prior work. This may, in part, explain gender differences in risk. As expected, but not previously documented, strongest relationships between the family environment and children's injuries that existed independent of externalizing behavior appeared at younger ages. Consistent with child developmental theory, cognitive and emotional family support contributed to "safe" behavioral development in children. This was found to be the case at all ages. As found in prior work, having one or more injuries in a given year was predictive of injuries in subsequent years. However, the pattern of repeating injuries disappeared with the addition of multivariate cont rols. This new finding suggests that persisting familial and behavioral factors may largely account for injury repetition in children. This research points to useful avenues for future research by concluding that: (1) viewing childhood in broad age groupings masks meaningful variation in the timing and patterning of risk, and, (2) models designed to explain externalizing behavior in children also provide a useful framework for examining children's injuries.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Joshua Adam. Familial and Behavioral Antecedents of Children's Injuries. Ph.D. Dissertation, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1996.
8. Mott, Joshua Adam
Family and Household Predictors of Injury Repetition Among Children in the United States
Working Paper, Health Policy and Research Center, The University of Illinois at Chicago, March 1998
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Institute for Health Research and Policy, University of Illinois at Chicago
Keyword(s): Accidents; Behavioral Problems; Child Health; Children, Home Environment; Children, Well-Being; Family Structure; Family Studies; Health Factors; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Household Structure; Injuries

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

OBJECTIVES. This study examined whether the repetition of reported medically attended injuries among children in the United States is related to the children's access to formal medical care. This study also examined the degree to which socioeconomic indicators and physical household risk factors of children defined as "injury repeaters" are different from those of other children. SETTING. A sample of children was taken from a national longitudinal survey in the United States for whom detailed child injury data were available in 1988 and 1990. Two-thousand and thirty-six children aged 4 to 12 in 1988 were drawn from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY). Since initiated in 1979, the NLSY has retained 91% of its respondents and is representative of a broader national sample of children. METHODS. Using multiple logistic regression techniques, fully controlled, stratified analyses examined whether injury repetition (defined as having reported injuries at both the 1988 and 1990 survey points) was related to the children's level of insurance coverage, family socioeconomic indicators, and household risk characteristics. RESULTS. The odds ratio reflecting the likelihood of injury in 1990 that was associated with having been injured in 1988 was significantly larger among the non-privately insured (OR = 4.55, 95% confidence interval = 2.22, 9.36) than among the privately insured (OR= 1.33, 95% CI =.83, 2.12). Injury repeaters were also more likely than other children to live in cluttered (p = .009) or dark (p = .017) home environments. CONCLUSIONS. Injury repetition cannot be "explained away" by the increased financial access to health care of some children. On the contrary, children with less financial access to care remained at greatest risk of injury repetition after multivariate control for differences in family background. These results also suggest that injury repeaters may share high risk home physical environments which set them apart from other children, and which potentially can be targeted among children who present to medical facilities with injuries.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Joshua Adam. "Family and Household Predictors of Injury Repetition Among Children in the United States." Working Paper, Health Policy and Research Center, The University of Illinois at Chicago, March 1998.
9. Mott, Joshua Adam
Family Environment, Child Behavior, and Child Injury Propensity
Presented: Indianapolis, IN, Health and Families Conference, November 1994
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Author
Keyword(s): Accidents; Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Birthweight; Child Care; Child Health; Children, Behavioral Development; Children, Well-Being; Family Background; Family Environment; Fathers, Absence; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Injuries; Mothers, Health; Pre-natal Care/Exposure; Pre/post Natal Behavior; Pre/post Natal Health Care

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Bibliography Citation
Mott, Joshua Adam. "Family Environment, Child Behavior, and Child Injury Propensity." Presented: Indianapolis, IN, Health and Families Conference, November 1994.
10. Mott, Joshua Adam
Personal and Family Predictors of Children's Medically Attended Injuries that Occurred in the Home
Injury Prevention 5,3 (September 1999): 189-193.
Also: http://injuryprevention.bmj.com/content/5/3/189.abstract
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: BMJ Publishing Group, Ltd. - British Medical Journal Publishing Group
Keyword(s): Child Health; Children, Behavioral Development; Children, Home Environment; Home Environment; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Injuries

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objective: This study examined the independent contributions of demographic, behavioral, and environmental antecedents of pediatric medically attended injuries that occurred in the home. Setting: Two thousand and thirty six American children aged 4-12 in 1988 were drawn from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. Method: Multiple logistic regression was used to examine whether having a medically attended injury that occurred in the home in 1990 was related to environmental, behavioral, and demographic indicators measured in 1988. To account for individual differences in access to care, results were stratified within samples of children that had, and had not, demonstrated a prior ability to access the medical care system for injury treatment. Results: Among children who did not access the medical care system for injury treatment in 1988, measures of home environmental risk factors did not distinguish those injured at home from those not injured at home in 1990. However, among children who did access the medical care system for injury treatment in 1988, indicators of "dark" (relative risk 4.68, p=0.019) and "cluttered" (relative risk 4.31, p=0.038) home environments became significantly and independently associated with home injuries in 1990. Conclusion: If not accounted for in data collection or analyses, individual differences in non-financial barriers to medical care may lead to an underestimation of the influences of important home environmental risk factors for medically attended injuries.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Joshua Adam. "Personal and Family Predictors of Children's Medically Attended Injuries that Occurred in the Home." Injury Prevention 5,3 (September 1999): 189-193.
11. Mott, Joshua Adam
Personal and Family Predictors of Children's Medically Attended Injuries that Occurred in the Home
Working Paper, Health Policy Center, University of Illinois at Chicago, April 1999
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Institute for Health Research and Policy, University of Illinois at Chicago
Keyword(s): Child Health; Children, Behavioral Development; Children, Home Environment; Home Environment; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Injuries

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objective: This study examined the independent contributions of demographic, behavioral, and environmental antecedents of pediatric medically attended injuries that occurred in the home. Setting: Two thousand and thirty six American children aged 4-12 in 1988 were drawn from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. Method: Multiple logistic regression was used to examine whether having a medically attended injury that occurred in the home in 1990 was related to environmental, behavioral, and demographic indicators measured in 1988. To account for individual differences in access to care, results were stratified within samples of children that had, and had not, demonstrated a prior ability to access the medical care system for injury treatment. Results: Among children who did not access the medical care system for injury treatment in 1988, measures of home environmental risk factors did not distinguish those injured at home from those not injured at home in 1990. However, among children who did access the medical care system for injury treatment in 1988, indicators of "dark" (relative risk 4.68, p=0.019) and "cluttered" (relative risk 4.31, p=0.038) home environments became significantly and independently associated with home injuries in 1990. Conclusion: If not accounted for in data collection or analyses, individual differences in non-financial barriers to medical care may lead to an underestimation of the influences of important home environmental risk factors for medically attended injuries.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Joshua Adam. "Personal and Family Predictors of Children's Medically Attended Injuries that Occurred in the Home." Working Paper, Health Policy Center, University of Illinois at Chicago, April 1999.
12. Mott, Joshua Adam
Repetition of Medically Attended Injuries Among Children in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth: An Issue of Access or Risk?
Presented: Washington, DC, Population Association of America Meetings, March 1997
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Accidents; Child Health; Children, Health Care; Children, Well-Being; Injuries

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Bibliography Citation
Mott, Joshua Adam. "Repetition of Medically Attended Injuries Among Children in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth: An Issue of Access or Risk?" Presented: Washington, DC, Population Association of America Meetings, March 1997.