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Source: Eastern Economic Journal
Resulting in 20 citations.
1. Cawley, John
Markowitz, Sara
Tauras, John
Obesity, Cigarette Prices, Youth Access Laws and Adolescent Smoking Initiation
Eastern Economic Journal 32,1 (Winter 2006): 149-170.
Also: http://econpapers.repec.org/article/eejeeconj/v_3a32_3ay_3a2006_3ai_3a1_3ap_3a149-170.htm
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan Journals
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Body Mass Index (BMI); Cigarette Use (see Smoking); Gender Differences; Modeling, Hazard/Event History/Survival/Duration; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Smoking (see Cigarette Use); Socioeconomic Factors; State-Level Data/Policy; Variables, Instrumental; Weight

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper examines the role of body weight in smoking initiation by adolescents. We estimate discrete-time hazard models of the decision to initiate smoking using data from the Children of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1979 Cohort. We control for cigarette prices, tobacco control policies and socioeconomic factors. To avoid problems stemming from the endogeneity of body weight, we also estimate models using the method of instrumental variables. We find clear gender differences. Lighter girls are less likely to initiate smoking, while current weight is uncorrelated with initiation among boys. Among girls, smoking initiation is insensitive to cigarette prices, but among boys smoking initiation is negatively correlated with cigarette prices. These gender-specific differences may help explain the mixed evidence of the impact of price on smoking initiation found in previous literature.
Bibliography Citation
Cawley, John, Sara Markowitz and John Tauras. "Obesity, Cigarette Prices, Youth Access Laws and Adolescent Smoking Initiation." Eastern Economic Journal 32,1 (Winter 2006): 149-170.
2. Cebi, Merve
Wang, Chunbei
Employer-provided Health Insurance and Labor Supply of Married Women
Eastern Economic Journal 39,4 (Fall 2013): 493-510.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23524347
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan Journals
Keyword(s): Husbands; Insurance, Health; Labor Supply; Wives, Work

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This work presents new evidence on the relationship between husbands' health insurance and wives' labor supply. Several studies using cross-sectional data have suggested that spousal coverage reduces wives' labor supply; however, these estimates potentially suffer from bias due to simultaneity of wives' labor supply and husbands' health insurance. This paper attempts to obtain consistent estimates by applying several panel data estimators to data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. The estimates suggest that the negative relationship found in cross-sections results mainly from spousal sorting and selection; controlling for unobserved heterogeneity leads to a smaller estimated effect of spousal coverage on wives' labor supply.
Bibliography Citation
Cebi, Merve and Chunbei Wang. "Employer-provided Health Insurance and Labor Supply of Married Women." Eastern Economic Journal 39,4 (Fall 2013): 493-510.
3. Classen, Timothy J.
Changes Over Time in the Relationship of Obesity to Education Accumulation
Eastern Economic Journal 43,3 (June 2017): 496-519.
Also: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1057/s41302-016-0079-5
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Body Mass Index (BMI); College Education; Educational Attainment; High School Completion/Graduates; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Obesity

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This research examines whether the influence of obesity in late adolescence on education accumulation has changed over time as the rate of obesity has increased substantially over the previous three decades. Previous studies have indicated that obesity has asymmetric consequences between genders on socioeconomic outcomes such as income, wealth, and education. The results in this project allow for consideration of the influence of obesity on education accumulation as the proportion of adolescent peers with weight problems varies substantially. I utilize data from the NLSY79 and the children of women in the NLSY79 to estimate the relationships of interest. I find that obese and overweight females in both generations are less likely to attend college than their peers with BMI levels in the recommended range. As well, obese females are less likely to graduate high school, with a larger effect in the earlier generation when obesity was relatively rare. I do not find any significant relationship between weight status and college attendance or high school graduation for males. Such asymmetric results for human capital investments across genders are consistent with previous evidence that obese women face a wage penalty relative to their non-obese peers, while obese males do not.
Bibliography Citation
Classen, Timothy J. "Changes Over Time in the Relationship of Obesity to Education Accumulation." Eastern Economic Journal 43,3 (June 2017): 496-519.
4. Cordes, Joseph J.
Goldfarb, Robert S.
Decreasing the 'Bad' for Mixed Public Goods and Bads: The Case of Public Sculpture
Eastern Economic Journal 33,2 (Spring 2007): 159-176.
Also: http://www.palgrave-journals.com/eej/journal/v33/n2/abs/eej200715a.html
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan Journals
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Family Background; Private Schools; Public Schools; School Characteristics/Rating/Safety; School Quality; Test Scores/Test theory/IRT; Tests and Testing

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Labor Market Experience for Youth are used to estimate the private school test score advantage. Regression results indicate that those who attend private schools score higher on the Armed Forces Qualifications Test. However, this advantage loses statistical significance with controls for family and school background. Decomposition of the private-public test score difference indicates that 78 percent of the gap can be explained by differences in average characteristics. Broken down further, 45 percent of the gap is due to differences in family background and 26 percent is due to differences in school quality.
Bibliography Citation
Cordes, Joseph J. and Robert S. Goldfarb. "Decreasing the 'Bad' for Mixed Public Goods and Bads: The Case of Public Sculpture ." Eastern Economic Journal 33,2 (Spring 2007): 159-176.
5. Dalmia, Sonia
Kelly, Claudia Smith
Sicilian, Paul
Marriage and Men's Earnings: Specialization and Cross-Productivity Effects
Eastern Economic Journal 42,3 (June 2016): 335-348.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1057/eej.2014.63
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan Journals
Keyword(s): Earnings, Husbands; Marriage; Wage Determination; Wives

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We use the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1979 to study the relationships between married men's earnings and marriage and spouse characteristics. We test three theories posited in the literature to explain these relationships--selection, specialization, and cross-productivity. While previous research finds evidence in support of all three explanations, we argue that the empirical models used are underspecified resulting in biased tests of the theories. We estimate a more complete model, encompassing all three theories. We find evidence in support for the selection and specialization hypotheses, but little support for the cross-productivity hypothesis.
Bibliography Citation
Dalmia, Sonia, Claudia Smith Kelly and Paul Sicilian. "Marriage and Men's Earnings: Specialization and Cross-Productivity Effects." Eastern Economic Journal 42,3 (June 2016): 335-348.
6. Desimone, Jeffrey Scott
Is Marijuana a Gateway Drug?
Eastern Economic Journal 24,2 (Spring 1998): 149-163.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/pss/40325834
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan Journals
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Child Health; Children, Home Environment; Drug Use; Illegal Activities; Poverty; Pre/post Natal Health Care; Substance Use

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Marijuana is by far the most widely-used illicit drug. Though marijuana is a powerful intoxicant with subjective psychedelic-like effects that are more complicated than those of alcohol or cocaine, research has yet to show that marijuana consumption has harmful consequences. In truth, the primary cause for concern about marijuana use may be that it potentially leads to the use of more hazardous illegal drugs such as cocaine. This premise arises from evidence that the overwhelming majority of adolescent and young adult cocaine users have previously used marijuana [O'Donnell and Clayton, 1982; Mills and Noyes, 1984; Yamaguchi and Kandel, 1984; Newcomb and gentler, 1986; Kandel and Yamaguchi, 1993] and is known as the gateway hypotheses. Since the use of cocaine is associated with problems such as crime, child poverty, poor neonatal health, and the spread of HIV, a gateway effect of marijuana on cocaine could signify a sizable social cost of marijuana use.
Bibliography Citation
Desimone, Jeffrey Scott. "Is Marijuana a Gateway Drug?" Eastern Economic Journal 24,2 (Spring 1998): 149-163.
7. Duncan, Kevin Craig
Sandy, Jonathan
Explaining the Performance Gap between Public and Private School Students
Eastern Economic Journal 33,2 (Spring 2007): 177-191.
Also: http://www.palgrave-journals.com/eej/journal/v33/n2/abs/eej200716a.html
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan Journals
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Education, Secondary; Private Schools; Public Schools; School Quality; Schooling; Test Scores/Test theory/IRT

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Labor Market Experience for Youth are used to estimate the private school test score advantage. Regression results indicate that those who attend private schools score higher on the Armed Forces Qualifications Test. However, this advantage loses statistical significance with controls for family and school background. Decomposition of the private-public test score difference indicates that 78 percent of the gap can be explained by differences in average characteristics. Broken down further, 45 percent of the gap is due to differences in family background and 26 percent is due to differences in school quality.
Bibliography Citation
Duncan, Kevin Craig and Jonathan Sandy. "Explaining the Performance Gap between Public and Private School Students." Eastern Economic Journal 33,2 (Spring 2007): 177-191.
8. Kane, John
Spizman, Lawrence M.
Rodgers, James
Gaskins, Rick
The Effect of the Loss of a Parent on the Future Earnings of a Minor Child.
Eastern Economic Journal 36,3 (Summer 2010): 370-390.
Also: http://www.palgrave-journals.com/eej/journal/v36/n3/abs/eej201025a.html
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan Journals
Keyword(s): Earnings; Educational Attainment; Fathers and Sons; Fathers, Absence; Mothers and Daughters; Parents, Single

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We quantify the effect of a parent's absence on a child's future earnings. A parent's absence because of separation or divorce reduces a child's lifetime earnings between 3 and 12 percent. Lifetime educational attainment is adversely affected by between 2 and 4 percent if a parent of the same gender as the child dies (a smaller impact than if absence is because of separation or divorce). No such adverse effect is found if a girl's father or a boy's mother dies. We conclude that it is sensible that lifetime earnings loss to children not be estimated in a parent's wrongful death case.
Bibliography Citation
Kane, John, Lawrence M. Spizman, James Rodgers and Rick Gaskins. "The Effect of the Loss of a Parent on the Future Earnings of a Minor Child. ." Eastern Economic Journal 36,3 (Summer 2010): 370-390.
9. Kane, Thomas J.
College Cost, Borrowing Constraints and the Timing of College Entry
Eastern Economic Journal 22,2 (Spring 1996): 181-194.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/pss/40325703
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan Journals
Keyword(s): College Education; Cost-Benefit Studies; Human Capital; Racial Differences; Savings; Tuition

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Many youth, for whom college may be a worthwhile investment, have insufficient collateral with which to secure a loan. Indeed, this is the purpose of the Guaranteed Student Loan program. However, borrowing under the GSL program (now called Stafford Loans) is subject to a maximum, which can be binding, particularly during the first 2 years at college. Unfortunately, the size and importance of these borrowing constraints, which fell in real value throughout much of the 1980s, remain untested. A simple model of human capital investment predicts that youth would enter college immediately after high school in the absence of borrowing constraints. In the presence of borrowing constraints, students may choose to work first and save for college. Therefore, as a test of the presence of borrowing constraints, the relationships between public tuition levels and age of college entry is evaluated using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth and the October Current Population Survey. The evidence suggests that borrowing constraints may bind, since delayed college entry is more common in high tuition states, particularly among blacks and low-income whites. Copyright Eastern Economic Association 1996. Fulltext online. Photocopy available from ABI/INFORM.
Bibliography Citation
Kane, Thomas J. "College Cost, Borrowing Constraints and the Timing of College Entry." Eastern Economic Journal 22,2 (Spring 1996): 181-194.
10. Meredith, Neil R.
Religion and Labor: An Examination of Religious Service Attendance and Unemployment Using Count Data Methods
Eastern Economic Journal 43,3 (June 2017): 451-471.
Also: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1057/eej.2015.54
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Health and Retirement Study (HRS); Religion; Unemployment

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

I use count data estimation with data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY79) cohort and the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) to evaluate the relationship between unemployment and the frequency of religious service attendance for individuals of working age. Empirical results for unemployed men and unemployed women in the NLSY79 show that religious service attendance is 22 percent lower and 72 percent higher, respectively, relative to employed men and employed women, respectively. Results for individuals in the HRS indicate that unemployed men and unemployed women attend religious services 18 percent less and 16 percent more frequently, respectively, relative to employed counterparts. There are no additional significant correlations for time spent unemployed.
Bibliography Citation
Meredith, Neil R. "Religion and Labor: An Examination of Religious Service Attendance and Unemployment Using Count Data Methods." Eastern Economic Journal 43,3 (June 2017): 451-471.
11. Meyer, Christine Siegwarth
Mukerjee, Swati
Investigating Dual Labor Market Theory for Women
Eastern Economic Journal 33,3 (Summer 2007): 301-316.
Also: http://www.palgrave-journals.com/eej/journal/v33/n3/abs/eej200727a.html
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan Journals
Keyword(s): Educational Returns; Human Capital Theory; Labor Market, Secondary; Skills; Training, On-the-Job; Wage Theory; Women

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using a switching model with unknown regimes, this paper demonstrates that the women's labor market is significantly better described by two wage setting mechanisms than by one. Though the evidence is consistent with the hypothesis that women may be rationed into the sector with low wages, the sectors do not entirely conform to traditional notions of dual labor markets and to results from the men's labor market. Both sectors have different patterns of rewards to human capital formation which explains the different patterns of labor force attachment in the two sectors,
Bibliography Citation
Meyer, Christine Siegwarth and Swati Mukerjee. "Investigating Dual Labor Market Theory for Women." Eastern Economic Journal 33,3 (Summer 2007): 301-316.
12. Mohanty, Madhu Sudan
Relationship between Positive Attitude and Job Satisfaction: Evidence from the US Data
Eastern Economic Journal 42,3 (June 2016): 349-372.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1057/eej.2014.76
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan Journals
Keyword(s): Attitudes; Job Satisfaction; Positive Affect (see Happiness/Optimism)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using data from the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79), a longitudinal data set from the United States, and following different cross-sectional and panel data estimation procedures, the study demonstrates that the worker's job satisfaction is related positively to his/her positive attitude. This conclusion remains valid regardless of whether the worker's wage income is treated as an exogenous variable or as an endogenous variable. The study thus claims that the worker’s satisfaction at workplace is related to not only the external job-related factors, but also his/her inner psychological attitude.
Bibliography Citation
Mohanty, Madhu Sudan. "Relationship between Positive Attitude and Job Satisfaction: Evidence from the US Data." Eastern Economic Journal 42,3 (June 2016): 349-372.
13. Munasinghe, Lalith Roshan
Sicherman, Nachum
Why Do Dancers Smoke? Smoking, Time Preference, and Wage Dynamics
Eastern Economic Journal 32,4 (Fall 2006): 595-616.
Also: http://web.holycross.edu/RePEc/eej/Archive/Volume32/V32N4P595_616.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan Journals
Keyword(s): Occupations; Smoking (see Cigarette Use); Time Preference; Wage Dynamics; Wage Growth

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The focus of the paper is on smoking and wage dynamics. Our main objective is to first empirically assess the correlation between smoking and wage growth over the life cycle, and second, to ask whether the estimated correlation between smoking and wage dynamics is consistent with the above time preference argument. Admittedly, our analysis of smoking and wage growth does not focus on dancers per se, and the intention of the opening paragraph is simply to motivate the hypothesis that individual discount rates may be a potentially important source of the observed differences in wage growth prospects among careers. Hence we need to address two key questions. First, what are the correlations between smoking and wage dynamics? Second, is smoking a reasonable proxy for an individual's discount rate?
Bibliography Citation
Munasinghe, Lalith Roshan and Nachum Sicherman. "Why Do Dancers Smoke? Smoking, Time Preference, and Wage Dynamics." Eastern Economic Journal 32,4 (Fall 2006): 595-616.
14. Polachek, Solomon W.
Heterogeneity in the Labor Market: Ability and Information Acquisition
Eastern Economic Journal 43,3 (June 2017): 377-390.
Also: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1057/s41302-017-0096-z
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Bargaining Model; Heterogeneity; Human Capital; Life Cycle Research; Skill Depreciation; Skills; Wage Theory

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper relates five previously unobserved individual attributes (namely, three measures of ability based on the lifecycle human capital model, a rate of time preference, and a skill depreciation rate) to estimates of worker and firm incomplete labor market information for 1539 NLS-Y respondents. First, it finds more able employees obtain more information (or bargain better) about wages than their less able counterparts, whereas firms obtain relatively more information (or bargain better) when dealing with low ability workers. Second, it finds that workers whose skills depreciate more quickly possess less wage information (or bargain more poorly) than workers whose skills depreciate less quickly. Similarly, it finds employees with a greater time discount rates have less wage information (or bargain more poorly) than those employees with lower discount rates.
Bibliography Citation
Polachek, Solomon W. "Heterogeneity in the Labor Market: Ability and Information Acquisition." Eastern Economic Journal 43,3 (June 2017): 377-390.
15. Robst, John Michael
Weinberg, Charlie
Childhood Behavioral Problems and Dropping Out of School
Eastern Economic Journal 36,4 (Fall 2010): 523-538.
Also: http://www.palgrave-journals.com/eej/journal/v36/n4/pdf/eej200940a.pdf
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan Journals
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Alcohol Use; Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Children, Behavioral Development; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Drug Use; Educational Attainment; Gender Differences; High School Dropouts; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Self-Esteem; Substance Use

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper examines the relationship between early childhood behaviors and dropping out of high school. The results indicate that boys exhibiting externalizing behaviors are more likely to drop out of school. No relationship between externalizing behaviors and high school graduation is found for girls. In addition, we examine the relationship between externalizing behavior and adolescent behaviors and outcomes often associated with an increased risk of dropping out. A relationship exists for boys between externalizing behaviors and outcomes such as alcohol and drug use, but the association is weaker for girls.
Bibliography Citation
Robst, John Michael and Charlie Weinberg. "Childhood Behavioral Problems and Dropping Out of School." Eastern Economic Journal 36,4 (Fall 2010): 523-538.
16. Sandy, Jonathan
Duncan, Kevin Craig
Does Private Education Increase Earnings?
Eastern Economic Journal 22,3 (Summer 1996): 303-312.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/pss/40325720
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan Journals
Keyword(s): Benefits, Fringe; Educational Status; Family Background; Human Capital; Job Tenure; Labor Economics; Private Schools; School Characteristics/Rating/Safety; Schooling; Training, Occupational; Training, On-the-Job; Unemployment Rate, Regional; Wage Differentials; Wage Levels

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper investigates the relative effectiveness of public and private schools by examining the differential effects of education on earnings. The paper estimates wage equations, controlling for private education, using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. Holding family background, ability, and other school characteristics constant, the results indicate that respondents attending private schools earn significantly higher wages than those attending public schools. (Adapted from EconLit)
Bibliography Citation
Sandy, Jonathan and Kevin Craig Duncan. "Does Private Education Increase Earnings?" Eastern Economic Journal 22,3 (Summer 1996): 303-312.
17. Sen, Bisakha
Frequency of Sexual Activity Among Unmarried Adolescent Girls: Do State Policies Pertaining To Abortion Access Matter?
Eastern Economic Journal 32,2 (Spring 2006): 313-330.
Also: http://econpapers.repec.org/article/eejeeconj/v_3a32_3ay_3a2006_3ai_3a2_3ap_3a313-330.htm
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan Journals
Keyword(s): Abortion; Contraception; Sexual Activity; Sexual Behavior; Teenagers

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The article focuses on a study about the frequency of sexual activity, as well as non-contracepted sexual activity, among unmarried adolescent women in the U.S. It reviews existing literature related to the impact of existing restrictions on abortion, as well as existing literature on adolescent sexual activity. The 1997 data from the first round of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth was employed in the study. It presents explanations for the non-effects of abortion policies on adolescent sexual behavior.
Bibliography Citation
Sen, Bisakha. "Frequency of Sexual Activity Among Unmarried Adolescent Girls: Do State Policies Pertaining To Abortion Access Matter?" Eastern Economic Journal 32,2 (Spring 2006): 313-330.
18. Yankow, Jeffrey Jon
The Wage Dynamics of Internal Migration within the United States
Eastern Economic Journal 25,3 (Summer 1999): 265-278.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/pss/40325930
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan Journals
Keyword(s): Migration; Mobility; Mobility, Labor Market; Regions; Wages

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The internal migration of workers between labor markets has important implications for the US economy. Assuming that workers are attracted to markets in which their labor services earn a higher real wage, aggregate migration flows are expected to be positive in the direction of low to high-income regions. Through a more efficient spatial allocation of labor resources, internal migration would then help to decrease regional earnings and employment disparities. However, the efficacy of migration as a regional equilibrium mechanism is dependent upon efficient migratory choices at the individual level. Using a sample of young men drawn from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979, an attempt is made to document and measure the extent of the long-term wage effects associated with the interstate migration. It is found that pecuniary returns generally accumulate over a five-year period following interstate migration. [Copyright Eastern Economic Association 1999]
Bibliography Citation
Yankow, Jeffrey Jon. "The Wage Dynamics of Internal Migration within the United States." Eastern Economic Journal 25,3 (Summer 1999): 265-278.
19. Zagorsky, Jay L.
Health and the Working Poor
Eastern Economic Journal 25,2 (Spring 1999): 169-189.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/pss/40325919
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan Journals
Keyword(s): Addiction; Disability; Disabled Workers; Employment; Health Factors; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Poverty; Welfare

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Recent welfare reforms that emphasize shifting people on public assistance into employment, no matter what they earn, has given new public policy importance to understanding the working poor. Central to these reforms are time limits that cap the number of years individuals can recieve benefits. Time limits implicitly assume that working provides enough income to lift one out of poverty and that the poor have no long-term health problems and other personal disabilities that can prevent them from escaping poverty and that working does not always boost individuals out of poverty. This research examines the working poor who are limited by health, drug and alcohol addiction or serious personal disabilities such as blindness. Approximately one-third of working-poor baby boomers suffers from at least one of these problems. This includes over half a million young baby boomers and approximately one percent of the U.S. population. Besides comprising a large proportion of the working poor, those with health and other limitations are important to examine because they have twice the chance of becoming working poor, spend more years in poverty, and have lower incomes after leaving poverty. In addition, almost half of the working poor who suffer from health or other serious limitations remain in poverty for five or more years. Thus, in order to reduce working poverty, policymakers must consider the needs and limitations of those who have significant health problems and other personal disabilities.
Bibliography Citation
Zagorsky, Jay L. "Health and the Working Poor." Eastern Economic Journal 25,2 (Spring 1999): 169-189.
20. Zimmer, David J.
Child Health and Maternal Work Activity: The Role of Unobserved Heterogeneity
Eastern Economic Journal 33,1 (Winter 2007): 43-64.
Also: http://www.palgrave-journals.com/eej/journal/v33/n1/abs/eej20073a.html
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan Journals
Keyword(s): Child Health; Heterogeneity; Maternal Employment; National Health Interview Survey (NHIS)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The article examines whether a mother's labor market behavior is affected by the presence of an unhealthy child. It addresses the issue of unmeasured factors that influence both child health and maternal employment by using variables that describe family access to care. Results suggest that married mothers and nonmarried mothers do not substantially differ in their responses to unhealthy children.

DATA
Data are from the 1996, 2000, and 2001 waves of the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS) conducted by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, a unit of the Department of Health and Human Services. MEPS is a large household survey of respondents drawn from the National Health Interview Survey and is designed to be nationally representative of the U.S. noninstitutionalized population. The survey consists of a series of five interviews over a two-and-a-half year period and records socioeconomic and health related information for each individual. While the multiple interview format of MEPS permits some limited longitudinal applications, child health variables relevant to this study are recorded only once a year. Therefore, the years are stacked and treated as a cross section sample. However, in light of modeling flexibilities offered by longitudinal analysis, comparison of MEPS to a separate longitudinal study is presented in the section on Results of Estimation. This longitudinal sample consists of 2,237 mothers drawn from the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) and is discussed in greater detail in the subsection NLSY Comparison.

Bibliography Citation
Zimmer, David J. "Child Health and Maternal Work Activity: The Role of Unobserved Heterogeneity." Eastern Economic Journal 33,1 (Winter 2007): 43-64.