Search Results

Author: Sicilian, Paul
Resulting in 6 citations.
1. Dalmia, Sonia
Kelly, Claudia Smith
Sicilian, Paul
Marriage and Men's Earnings: Specialization and Cross-Productivity Effects
Eastern Economic Journal 42,3 (June 2016): 335-348.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1057/eej.2014.63
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan Journals
Keyword(s): Earnings, Husbands; Marriage; Wage Determination; Wives

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We use the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1979 to study the relationships between married men's earnings and marriage and spouse characteristics. We test three theories posited in the literature to explain these relationships--selection, specialization, and cross-productivity. While previous research finds evidence in support of all three explanations, we argue that the empirical models used are underspecified resulting in biased tests of the theories. We estimate a more complete model, encompassing all three theories. We find evidence in support for the selection and specialization hypotheses, but little support for the cross-productivity hypothesis.
Bibliography Citation
Dalmia, Sonia, Claudia Smith Kelly and Paul Sicilian. "Marriage and Men's Earnings: Specialization and Cross-Productivity Effects." Eastern Economic Journal 42,3 (June 2016): 335-348.
2. Dalmia, Sonia
Sicilian, Paul
Kids Cause Specialization: Evidence for Becker's Household Division of Labor Hypothesis
International Advances in Economic Research 14,4 (November 2008): 448-459.
Also: http://web.ebscohost.com.proxy.lib.ohio-state.edu/ehost/pdf?vid=3&hid=106&sid=2338df91-7fbf-4d7c-b8fa-239f91d9cfff%40sessionmgr112
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Child Care; Children; Current Population Survey (CPS) / CPS-Fertility Supplement; Domestic Violence; Family Planning; Family Structure; Fertility; Marital Dissolution; Marriage; Sex Ratios

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We examine the division of labor within households and marital matching patterns in the USA using both the Current Population Survey (CPS) and the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY). We use Becker's theory of marriage markets by estimating household production functions and using the estimates to test for positive or negative assortive matching. We also construct match matrices, which are used to judge how well our model fits Becker's theory. We find positive assortative matching on all traits in young marriages and couples without children, and negative assortment along some traits in marriages with children. This suggests that children induce specialization whereas couples without children exploit household public goods.
Bibliography Citation
Dalmia, Sonia and Paul Sicilian. "Kids Cause Specialization: Evidence for Becker's Household Division of Labor Hypothesis." International Advances in Economic Research 14,4 (November 2008): 448-459.
3. Grossberg, Adam J.
Sicilian, Paul
Legal Minimum Wages and Employment Duration
Southern Economic Journal 70,3 (January 2004): 631-646.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4135335
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Southern Economic Association
Keyword(s): Benefits, Fringe; Current Population Survey (CPS) / CPS-Fertility Supplement; Gender Differences; Heterogeneity; Human Capital; Job Tenure; Job Turnover; Labor Economics; Minimum Wage; Modeling, Hazard/Event History/Survival/Duration; Wage Rates

Estimates the effect of minimum wage on employment duration in the U.S., using event history data from the 1988-1994 rounds of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. Turnover due to rents created by minimum wages; Dependence of the net effect of minimum wage on its magnitude relative to the typical wage in the labor market.
Bibliography Citation
Grossberg, Adam J. and Paul Sicilian. "Legal Minimum Wages and Employment Duration." Southern Economic Journal 70,3 (January 2004): 631-646.
4. Lowen, Aaron
Sicilian, Paul
"Family-Friendly" Fringe Benefits and the Gender Wage Gap
Journal of Labor Research 30,2 (June 2009): 101-119.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/kx48421695121rk2/
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: John M. Olin Institute at George Mason University
Keyword(s): Benefits, Fringe; Family Studies; Gender Differences; Occupational Segregation; Wage Gap

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Evidence suggests a large portion of the gender wage gap is explained by gender occupational segregation. A common hypothesis is that gender differences in preferences or abilities explain this segregation; women may prefer jobs that provide more "family-friendly" fringe benefits. Much of the research provides no direct evidence on gender differences in access to fringe benefits, nor how provision affects wages. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979, we find that women are more likely to receive family-friendly benefits, but not other types of fringe benefits. We find no evidence that the differences in fringe benefits explain the gender wage gap. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Lowen, Aaron and Paul Sicilian. ""Family-Friendly" Fringe Benefits and the Gender Wage Gap." Journal of Labor Research 30,2 (June 2009): 101-119.
5. Sicilian, Paul
Grossberg, Adam J.
Does Supervisor Gender Affect Wages?
Empirical Economics 46,2 (March 2014): 479-499.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00181-013-0695-4?no-access=true
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Current Population Survey (CPS) / CPS-Fertility Supplement; Gender; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Supervisor Characteristics; Wage Effects; Wage Penalty/Career Penalty

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper uses data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1979 (NLSY79) and the Current Population Survey to estimate the wage effects of having a female supervisor. Existing studies, using OLS to estimate the supervisor gender effect, find wage penalties for both men and women associated with working for a female supervisor. We extend this research in two important ways. First, we control for gender segregation at job level as opposed to the broader occupation level. This is important because of the concern that supervisor gender is simply a proxy for the gender-type of the job. Second, we apply fixed effects estimation to control for selection effects of supervisor gender. When using OLS we find estimates of the supervisor gender effect similar to those in the existing literature. However, when using fixed effects we find no evidence of a supervisor gender effect for women and only a small, marginally significant effect for men. We conclude that existing OLS estimates overstate the importance of the impact of supervisor gender on wages.
Bibliography Citation
Sicilian, Paul and Adam J. Grossberg. "Does Supervisor Gender Affect Wages?" Empirical Economics 46,2 (March 2014): 479-499.
6. Sicilian, Paul
Grossberg, Adam J.
Investment in Human Capital and Gender Wage Differences: Evidence from the NLSY
Applied Economics 33,4 (2001): 463-471.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00036840123000
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Keyword(s): Gender; Gender Differences; Human Capital; Modeling; Time Use; Training, Off-the-Job; Training, On-the-Job; Wage Differentials; Wage Gap

This paper uses data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth to investigate gender differences in returns to various forms of human capital. Since the NLSY includes relatively detailed information regarding on- and off-the-job training, special emphasis is placed on measuring gender differences in the incidence of and returns to formal post-school training. Also considered is the role of non-human capital factors such as industry and occupation in explaining the wage gap. It is found that about 60% of the gender wage gap in the sample is explained by mean differences in individual characteristics and market circumstances. This suggests a smaller role for discrimination in explaining the wage gap than previous research has found. The research indicates that training does not affect the gender wage gap.
Bibliography Citation
Sicilian, Paul and Adam J. Grossberg. "Investment in Human Capital and Gender Wage Differences: Evidence from the NLSY." Applied Economics 33,4 (2001): 463-471.