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Author: Yankow, Jeffrey Jon
Resulting in 8 citations.
1. Weinberg, Bruce A.
Reagan, Patricia Benton
Yankow, Jeffrey Jon
Do Neighborhoods Affect Hours Worked? Evidence from Longitudinal Data
Journal of Labor Economics 22,4 (October 2004): 891-825.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/423158
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Education; Educational Attainment; Ethnic Differences; Labor Force Participation; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Mothers, Education; Neighborhood Effects; Racial Differences; Record Linkage (also see Data Linkage); Social Environment; Social Influences; Work Attachment; Work Experience

Using a confidential version of the NLSY79, we estimate large effects of neighborhood social characteristics and job proximity on labor market activity. A variety of neighborhood social characteristics are associated with less market work. Social characteristics have nonlinear effects, with the greatest impact in the worst neighborhoods. Social characteristics are also more important for less-educated workers. Exploiting the panel aspects of our data, we find that estimates that do not account for neighborhood selection on the basis of time-invariant and time-varying unobserved individual characteristics substantially overstate the social effects of neighborhoods but understate the effects of job access. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Weinberg, Bruce A., Patricia Benton Reagan and Jeffrey Jon Yankow. "Do Neighborhoods Affect Hours Worked? Evidence from Longitudinal Data." Journal of Labor Economics 22,4 (October 2004): 891-825.
2. Yankow, Jeffrey Jon
A Longitudinal Analysis of the Impact of State Economic Freedom on Individual Wages
Journal of Regional Analysis and Policy 44,1 (2014): 58-70.
Also: http://www.jrap-journal.org/pastvolumes/2010/v44/v44_n1_a5_yankow.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Mid-Continent Regional Science Association
Keyword(s): Geocoded Data; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Modeling, OLS; State-Level Data/Policy; Wage Growth; Wages

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Matching panel data drawn from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 to the state-level index of economic freedom published in Economic Freedom of North America 2010, this study establishes an empirical relationship between wages at the individual level and the degree of state economic freedom. In OLS models, a one standard deviation improvement in the state economic freedom score is found to increase wages by 2.5 percent. Models that control for both person-specific and state-level fixed effects reveal a wage increase of more than 8 percent. Significant variation in wage gains is found across the different areas used to construct the economic freedom measure as well as across broad worker characteristics like race and schooling level.
Bibliography Citation
Yankow, Jeffrey Jon. "A Longitudinal Analysis of the Impact of State Economic Freedom on Individual Wages." Journal of Regional Analysis and Policy 44,1 (2014): 58-70.
3. Yankow, Jeffrey Jon
Employed Job Search among Young Workers: Do Women Still Search Differently than Men in the Internet Age?
International Advances in Economic Research 23,2 (May 2017): 245-259.
Also: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs12103-016-9365-3
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Computer Use; Gender; Job Search

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using data from the 2008–2011 waves of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997, this study explores the job search methods and strategies utilized by young workers. Although women are found to be marginally less likely to engage in on-the-job search than men, when they do they are equally likely to use the internet. The most important gender difference identified is that marriage serves as a strong inhibiting factor to search, both online and offline, for women but not so for men. In terms of search methods, men and women show almost identical patterns of usage. While there is substitution between online and offline search within particular method categories, employed searchers are generally using the internet as a complement to rather than as a replacement for more traditional offline search methods.
Bibliography Citation
Yankow, Jeffrey Jon. "Employed Job Search among Young Workers: Do Women Still Search Differently than Men in the Internet Age?" International Advances in Economic Research 23,2 (May 2017): 245-259.
4. Yankow, Jeffrey Jon
Migration, Job Change and Wage Growth Among Young Men
Ph.D. Dissertation, The Ohio State University, 1999
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: UMI - University Microfilms, Bell and Howell Information and Learning
Keyword(s): Human Capital; Job Turnover; Labor Economics; Migration; Mobility, Job; Modeling, Probit; Wage Dynamics; Wage Growth

Using data drawn from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979, this dissertation explores the relationship between migration, job mobility and wage development during the early stages of the working career. Attention is focused on the between-job wage growth accompanying job transitions, comparing the returns from changing jobs across labor markets relative to local job changes. Between-job wage growth regression analysis reveals that, holding other factors constant, workers receive a positive return to migration above the return to job changing as predicted by the human capital model of migration. Workers migrating between jobs collect an additional 3.2 percent wage boost above the average return to within-location job change. Recognizing that economic rewards to migration need not be forthcoming immediately upon a change of locations, the next portion of this research complements much of the preceding work by allowing for the full pecuniary gain to be realized over an extended time horizon. Time-varying returns are measured using an extended panel of data to estimate a more flexible earnings specification than used in previous studies of migration. In particular, this research demonstrates that young migrants receive significant positive returns to geographic mobility. These pecuniary returns generally accumulate over a five-year period following migration, during which time migrants experience superior wage growth vis-a-vis non-migrants. Starting at levels nearly identical to non-migrants in the years just prior to migration, migrant wages increase steadily over the first five years post-migration relative to the non-migrant benchmark. After five years, migrant wages peak nearly 5 percent higher than the non-migrant wage level. The final section estimates a Probit model of migration accounting for the selectivity associated with the decision to change jobs. Because migration is only observed conditional on a change of employers, full model specification necessitates both a migration and job change equation. The model is shown to be particularly useful for disentangling the impact of variables on the decision to migrate from their separate effect on the decision to change jobs.
Bibliography Citation
Yankow, Jeffrey Jon. Migration, Job Change and Wage Growth Among Young Men. Ph.D. Dissertation, The Ohio State University, 1999.
5. Yankow, Jeffrey Jon
Migration, Job Change, and Wage Growth: A New Perspective on the Pecuniary Return to Geographic Mobility
Journal of Regional Science 43,3 (August 2003): 483-517.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1467-9787.00308/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Educational Attainment; Educational Returns; Male Sample; Migration; Mobility, Job; School Completion; Wage Dynamics

Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979, this study examines the pattern of early career job mobility and migration in a sample of young male workers. Primary interest lies in the between-job wage change accompanying job transitions as well as the extended time-profile of migrant earnings. When the sample of job transitions is partitioned by education level, contemporaneous returns are found only for workers with twelve or less years of completed schooling. In contrast, highly educated workers demonstrate significant extended returns to migration with the bulk of pecuniary rewards accruing with a lag of nearly two years. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Yankow, Jeffrey Jon. "Migration, Job Change, and Wage Growth: A New Perspective on the Pecuniary Return to Geographic Mobility." Journal of Regional Science 43,3 (August 2003): 483-517.
6. Yankow, Jeffrey Jon
Some Empirical Evidence of the Efficacy of Job Matching in Urban Labor Markets
International Advances in Economic Research 15,2 (May 2009): 233-244
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Job Search; Rural/Urban Differences; Urbanization/Urban Living

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Theory predicts that workers in cities are more likely to engage in job search, ceteris paribus, due to market efficiencies associated with greater job density. However, if job search is more efficient in urban markets, then the quality of a given job match should also tend to be higher in cities, ceteris paribus. Employed workers living in cities might then be expected to search less than their nonurban counterparts. In this latter instance, it is not city residency itself that makes search less likely, but rather the positive correlation between city residency and job match quality. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979, this prediction is confirmed: The estimated coefficient on an indicator of urban residency is found to be near zero and statistically insignificant in models of employed search that omit proxies for job match quality. When job match proxies are included in the models, the estimated coefficient on urban residency becomes positive and highly significant. This result suggests that workers are not only more likely to engage in employed search in urban labor markets, but also tend to find more productive job matches in cities over time. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

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Bibliography Citation
Yankow, Jeffrey Jon. "Some Empirical Evidence of the Efficacy of Job Matching in Urban Labor Markets." International Advances in Economic Research 15,2 (May 2009): 233-244.
7. Yankow, Jeffrey Jon
The Wage Dynamics of Internal Migration within the United States
Eastern Economic Journal 25,3 (Summer 1999): 265-278.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/pss/40325930
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan Journals
Keyword(s): Migration; Mobility; Mobility, Labor Market; Regions; Wages

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The internal migration of workers between labor markets has important implications for the US economy. Assuming that workers are attracted to markets in which their labor services earn a higher real wage, aggregate migration flows are expected to be positive in the direction of low to high-income regions. Through a more efficient spatial allocation of labor resources, internal migration would then help to decrease regional earnings and employment disparities. However, the efficacy of migration as a regional equilibrium mechanism is dependent upon efficient migratory choices at the individual level. Using a sample of young men drawn from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979, an attempt is made to document and measure the extent of the long-term wage effects associated with the interstate migration. It is found that pecuniary returns generally accumulate over a five-year period following interstate migration. [Copyright Eastern Economic Association 1999]
Bibliography Citation
Yankow, Jeffrey Jon. "The Wage Dynamics of Internal Migration within the United States." Eastern Economic Journal 25,3 (Summer 1999): 265-278.
8. Yankow, Jeffrey Jon
Horney, Mary Jean
Employed Job Search Among Young Women: The Role of Marriage and Children
Working Paper, Department of Economics and Business Administration, Furman University, February 2004.
Also: http://irving.vassar.edu/MIEC/Yankow_Horney_GenderSearch.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Author
Keyword(s): Behavior; Job Search; Marital Status; Modeling, Multilevel; Modeling, Probit; Modeling, Random Effects

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The purpose of this study is to explore the employed search behavior of young women....The data for this analysis come from the 1980, 1984, and 1996 waves of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY79). Using information on employed job search from all three years, we estimate a series of models: i) a binary probit model of employed search for each year; ii) a random-effects probit model that accounts for unobservable preferences for employed search; and, iii) an ordered probit model measuring the intensity of search by young women.
Bibliography Citation
Yankow, Jeffrey Jon and Mary Jean Horney. "Employed Job Search Among Young Women: The Role of Marriage and Children." Working Paper, Department of Economics and Business Administration, Furman University, February 2004.