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Author: Goldfarb, Robert S.
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Cordes, Joseph J.
Goldfarb, Robert S.
Decreasing the 'Bad' for Mixed Public Goods and Bads: The Case of Public Sculpture
Eastern Economic Journal 33,2 (Spring 2007): 159-176.
Also: http://www.palgrave-journals.com/eej/journal/v33/n2/abs/eej200715a.html
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan Journals
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Family Background and Culture; Private Schools; Public Schools; School Characteristics/Rating/Safety; School Quality; Test Scores/Test theory/IRT; Tests and Testing

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Labor Market Experience for Youth are used to estimate the private school test score advantage. Regression results indicate that those who attend private schools score higher on the Armed Forces Qualifications Test. However, this advantage loses statistical significance with controls for family and school background. Decomposition of the private-public test score difference indicates that 78 percent of the gap can be explained by differences in average characteristics. Broken down further, 45 percent of the gap is due to differences in family background and 26 percent is due to differences in school quality.
Bibliography Citation
Cordes, Joseph J. and Robert S. Goldfarb. "Decreasing the 'Bad' for Mixed Public Goods and Bads: The Case of Public Sculpture ." Eastern Economic Journal 33,2 (Spring 2007): 159-176.
2. Goldfarb, Robert S.
Leonard, Thomas C.
Markowitz, Sara
Suranovic, Steven
Can a Rational Choice Framework Make Sense of Anorexia Nervosa?
NBER Working Paper 14838, National Bureau of Economic Research, April 2009.
Also: http://www.nber.org/papers/w14838.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)
Keyword(s): Behavioral Problems; Body Mass Index (BMI); Cigarette Use (see Smoking); Health Factors; Health, Mental; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Height; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Parental Influences; Parenting Skills/Styles; Risk-Taking; Weight

Can a rational choice modeling framework help broaden our understanding of anorexia nervosa? This question is interesting because anorexia nervosa is a serious health concern, and because of the following issue: could a rational choice approach shed useful light on a condition which appears to involve "choosing" to be ill? We present a model of weight choice and dieting applicable to anorexia nervosa, and the sometimes-associated purging behavior. We also present empirical evidence about factors possibly contributing to anorexia nervosa. We offer this analysis as a consciousness-raising way of thinking about the condition.
Bibliography Citation
Goldfarb, Robert S., Thomas C. Leonard, Sara Markowitz and Steven Suranovic. "Can a Rational Choice Framework Make Sense of Anorexia Nervosa?." NBER Working Paper 14838, National Bureau of Economic Research, April 2009.