Search Results

Author: Sandy, Jonathan
Resulting in 5 citations.
1. Duncan, Kevin Craig
Prus, Mark J.
Sandy, Jonathan
Marital Status, Children and Women's Labor Market Choices
Journal of Socio-Economics 22,3 (Fall 1993): 277-288.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/105353579390013B
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Human Capital Theory; Labor Force Participation; Marital Status; Modeling, Probit; Occupational Choice

This article provides a test of the human capital prediction that women with more labor force intermittence hold occupations characterized by lower earnings penalties for intermittence. By using marital and family status as proxies of labor market commitment the authors find that, on average, married women with and without children spend more time out of the labor force than never-married, childless women. Results from earnings regressions fail to indicate that the occupations they hold are characterized by significantly lower penalties for time not working. However, results from a probit model indicate that a woman's marital status, the presence of children, and the level of the husband's education significantly affect the probability of working. The results reported here suggest that human capital theory explains a woman's decision to work, but does not necessarily explain her occupational choice.
Bibliography Citation
Duncan, Kevin Craig, Mark J. Prus and Jonathan Sandy. "Marital Status, Children and Women's Labor Market Choices." Journal of Socio-Economics 22,3 (Fall 1993): 277-288.
2. Duncan, Kevin Craig
Sandy, Jonathan
Explaining the Performance Gap between Public and Private School Students
Eastern Economic Journal 33,2 (Spring 2007): 177-191.
Also: http://www.palgrave-journals.com/eej/journal/v33/n2/abs/eej200716a.html
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan Journals
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Education, Secondary; Private Schools; Public Schools; School Quality; Schooling; Test Scores/Test theory/IRT

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Labor Market Experience for Youth are used to estimate the private school test score advantage. Regression results indicate that those who attend private schools score higher on the Armed Forces Qualifications Test. However, this advantage loses statistical significance with controls for family and school background. Decomposition of the private-public test score difference indicates that 78 percent of the gap can be explained by differences in average characteristics. Broken down further, 45 percent of the gap is due to differences in family background and 26 percent is due to differences in school quality.
Bibliography Citation
Duncan, Kevin Craig and Jonathan Sandy. "Explaining the Performance Gap between Public and Private School Students." Eastern Economic Journal 33,2 (Spring 2007): 177-191.
3. Duncan, Kevin
Sandy, Jonathan
Using the Blinder-Oaxaca Decomposition Method to Measure Racial Bias in Achievement Tests
Review of Black Political Economy 40,2 (June 2013): 185-206.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12114-012-9146-2/fulltext.html
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB); Modeling; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Racial Differences; Racial Equality/Inequality; Test Scores/Test theory/IRT

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The Blinder-Oaxaca decomposition technique is typically applied to gender or racial earnings gaps with the goal of determining the percent of the gap that can be attributed to differences in attributes between groups and to labor market discrimination. We apply this technique to the racial gap in achievement tests with the goal of measuring the relative racial bias of these tests. The Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB) and the Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT) were administered to respondents from the 1997 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. Decomposition results indicate that up to 49.5% of the white-black gap in the PIAT is explained by racial differences in average attributes. The corresponding figure for the ASVAB is 44.7 %. Since the same sample and specification are used in estimating ASVAB and PIAT scores, the difference in the percent of the gaps due to attributes can be ascribed to test score bias and not omitted variable bias. Therefore, the results suggest that the "discrimination" or bias of the ASVAB is greater than the PIAT.
Bibliography Citation
Duncan, Kevin and Jonathan Sandy. "Using the Blinder-Oaxaca Decomposition Method to Measure Racial Bias in Achievement Tests." Review of Black Political Economy 40,2 (June 2013): 185-206.
4. Sandy, Jonathan
Duncan, Kevin Craig
Does Private Education Increase Earnings?
Eastern Economic Journal 22,3 (Summer 1996): 303-312.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/pss/40325720
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan Journals
Keyword(s): Benefits, Fringe; Educational Status; Family Background; Human Capital; Job Tenure; Labor Economics; Private Schools; School Characteristics/Rating/Safety; Schooling; Training, Occupational; Training, On-the-Job; Unemployment Rate, Regional; Wage Differentials; Wage Levels

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper investigates the relative effectiveness of public and private schools by examining the differential effects of education on earnings. The paper estimates wage equations, controlling for private education, using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. Holding family background, ability, and other school characteristics constant, the results indicate that respondents attending private schools earn significantly higher wages than those attending public schools. (Adapted from EconLit)
Bibliography Citation
Sandy, Jonathan and Kevin Craig Duncan. "Does Private Education Increase Earnings?" Eastern Economic Journal 22,3 (Summer 1996): 303-312.
5. Sandy, Jonathan
Duncan, Kevin Craig
Examining the Achievement Test Score Gap Between Urban and Suburban Students
Education Economics 18,3 (September 2010): 297-315.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/09645290903465713
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Carfax Publishing Company ==> Taylor & Francis
Keyword(s): Achievement; Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB); Disadvantaged, Economically; Neighborhood Effects; Private Schools; School Quality; Socioeconomic Factors; Urbanization/Urban Living

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Labor Market Experience for Youth (1997 cohort) are used to examine the urban school achievement gap. Specifically, we use the Blinder-Oaxaca technique to decompose differences in Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery scores for students who attended urban and suburban schools. We find that approximately 75% of the gap in this achievement measure is explained by the high concentration of disadvantaged students in urban schools. Broken down further, 36% of the gap can be attributed to differences in family background. The lower income of urban families alone explains 25% of the gap. Differences in measures of school quality, such as small classes, large schools, and private school attendance, explain very little of the gap. While current policy focuses on schools and school reform, our results are a reminder that meaningful efforts to improve performance in urban schools must address socioeconomic conditions in urban areas. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Sandy, Jonathan and Kevin Craig Duncan. "Examining the Achievement Test Score Gap Between Urban and Suburban Students." Education Economics 18,3 (September 2010): 297-315.