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Author: Dalmia, Sonia
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Dalmia, Sonia
Kelly, Claudia Smith
Sicilian, Paul
Marriage and Men's Earnings: Specialization and Cross-Productivity Effects
Eastern Economic Journal 42,3 (June 2016): 335-348.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1057/eej.2014.63
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan Journals
Keyword(s): Earnings, Husbands; Marriage; Wage Determination; Wives

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We use the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1979 to study the relationships between married men's earnings and marriage and spouse characteristics. We test three theories posited in the literature to explain these relationships--selection, specialization, and cross-productivity. While previous research finds evidence in support of all three explanations, we argue that the empirical models used are underspecified resulting in biased tests of the theories. We estimate a more complete model, encompassing all three theories. We find evidence in support for the selection and specialization hypotheses, but little support for the cross-productivity hypothesis.
Bibliography Citation
Dalmia, Sonia, Claudia Smith Kelly and Paul Sicilian. "Marriage and Men's Earnings: Specialization and Cross-Productivity Effects." Eastern Economic Journal 42,3 (June 2016): 335-348.
2. Dalmia, Sonia
Sicilian, Paul
Kids Cause Specialization: Evidence for Becker's Household Division of Labor Hypothesis
International Advances in Economic Research 14,4 (November 2008): 448-459.
Also: http://web.ebscohost.com.proxy.lib.ohio-state.edu/ehost/pdf?vid=3&hid=106&sid=2338df91-7fbf-4d7c-b8fa-239f91d9cfff%40sessionmgr112
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Child Care; Children; Current Population Survey (CPS) / CPS-Fertility Supplement; Domestic Violence; Family Planning; Family Structure; Fertility; Marital Dissolution; Marriage; Sex Ratios

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We examine the division of labor within households and marital matching patterns in the USA using both the Current Population Survey (CPS) and the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY). We use Becker's theory of marriage markets by estimating household production functions and using the estimates to test for positive or negative assortive matching. We also construct match matrices, which are used to judge how well our model fits Becker's theory. We find positive assortative matching on all traits in young marriages and couples without children, and negative assortment along some traits in marriages with children. This suggests that children induce specialization whereas couples without children exploit household public goods.
Bibliography Citation
Dalmia, Sonia and Paul Sicilian. "Kids Cause Specialization: Evidence for Becker's Household Division of Labor Hypothesis." International Advances in Economic Research 14,4 (November 2008): 448-459.