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Author: Munasib, Abdul
Resulting in 6 citations.
1. Andrew, Mark
Haurin, Donald R.
Munasib, Abdul
Explaining the Route to Owner-Occupation: A Transatlantic Comparison
Journal of Housing Economics 15,3 (September 2006): 189-216.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1051137706000180#
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): British Household Panel Survey (BHPS); Cross-national Analysis; Home Ownership; Income; Modeling, Hazard/Event History/Survival/Duration; Wealth

This paper compares the transition of young adults from renting to first-time homeownership in Britain and the U.S. By adopting a common theoretical and methodological framework, we identify behavioural similarities and differences in transitions in the two countries. We find that the higher ownership rates among British young adults are caused by quicker transitions and our study sheds light on which factors contribute to this difference. We use British and U.S. longitudinal data sets for the analysis and a relative risk Cox hazard model in the empirical work. Although there are behavioural similarities in attaining first-time homeownership with regard to the demographic and housing market variables, there are substantial differences in the two populations’ responses to income and wealth, where we find that young adults’ transitions to homeownership in Britain are more responsive.
Bibliography Citation
Andrew, Mark, Donald R. Haurin and Abdul Munasib. "Explaining the Route to Owner-Occupation: A Transatlantic Comparison." Journal of Housing Economics 15,3 (September 2006): 189-216.
2. Bhattacharya, Samrat
Munasib, Abdul
Can Too Much TV Ground You for Life? Television and Child Outcomes
Working Paper, Department of Economics and Legal Studies in Business, Oklahoma State University - Stillwater, April 2007
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Department of Economics and Legal Studies in Business, Oklahoma State University - Stillwater
Keyword(s): Academic Development; Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Body Mass Index (BMI); Child Health; Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS); Computer Use; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Siblings; Television Viewing; Weight

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The number of hours a typical child watches the television is almost double the suggested guideline by American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). A very large number of studies have claimed an adverse effect of television on children and teenagers. In this paper, we use The National Longitudinal Survey (NLS), a rich, nationally representative data set that allows us to observe the inter-temporal variations in television viewing behavior and the child outcome measures. Unlike the previous studies, we account for unobservables at the family and the child level, and find that hours of television viewing does not have any effect on Body Mass Index, or reading and mathematics test scores. Only in case of behavioral problems television does have an adverse effect, but the magnitude is small. Despite the conventional wisdom and the ongoing populist movement towards proactive policies, these findings suggest that an emphasis on policies based on existing studies may be premature.
Bibliography Citation
Bhattacharya, Samrat and Abdul Munasib. "Can Too Much TV Ground You for Life? Television and Child Outcomes." Working Paper, Department of Economics and Legal Studies in Business, Oklahoma State University - Stillwater, April 2007.
3. Guettabi, Mouhcine
Munasib, Abdul
The Impact of Obesity on Consumer Bankruptcy
Economics and Human Biology 17 (April 2015): 208-224.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1570677X14000884
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Bankruptcy; Body Mass Index (BMI); Obesity

Over the last two decades, both bankruptcy and obesity rates in the U.S. have seen a steady rise. As obesity is one of the leading causes of medical and morbidity related economic costs, its influence on personal bankruptcy is analyzed in this study. Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979, we employ a duration model to investigate the relative importance of obesity on the timing of bankruptcy. Even after accounting for possible endogeneity of BMI and controlling for a wide variety of individual and aggregate-level confounding factors, being obese puts one at a greater risk of filing for bankruptcy.
Bibliography Citation
Guettabi, Mouhcine and Abdul Munasib. "The Impact of Obesity on Consumer Bankruptcy." Economics and Human Biology 17 (April 2015): 208-224.
4. Guettabi, Mouhcine
Munasib, Abdul
Urban Sprawl, Obesogenic Environment, and Child Weight
Journal of Regional Science 54,3 (June 2014): 378-401.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jors.12123/abstract
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Body Mass Index (BMI); Child Health; Environment, Pollution/Urban Density; Exercise; Gender Differences; Geocoded Data; Maternal Employment; Mobility, Residential; Obesity; Physical Activity (see also Exercise); Residence; Weight

Using the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth along with the child survey, we examine the relationship between urban sprawl of U.S. metro counties and the body mass index (BMI) of children who reside in these counties. We make a distinction between urban sprawl in a county and its geographical placement in the urban hierarchy. Even after accounting for unobserved individual heterogeneity and resulting selection bias, we find that urban sprawl is positively related to child BMI and distance to large metros is negatively related to child BMI. These effects are somewhat pronounced among girls and middle/high school children.
Bibliography Citation
Guettabi, Mouhcine and Abdul Munasib. "Urban Sprawl, Obesogenic Environment, and Child Weight." Journal of Regional Science 54,3 (June 2014): 378-401.
5. Haurin, Donald R.
Munasib, Abdul
Rosenthal, Stuart S.
Terminations of First-Time Homeownership
Economics Working Paper Series OKSWP0702, Department of Economics, Oklahoma State University, 2007.
Also: http://spears.okstate.edu/ecls-working-papers/files/0702_Munasib_SustianFHO.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Department of Economics, Oklahoma State University
Keyword(s): Home Ownership; Racial Differences; Wealth

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The cliché “once a homeowner, always a homeowner” is not true. We study the causes of terminations of spells of first-time homeownership. Using a national panel data set, we find that the likelihood of a household terminating a spell of homeownership is predictable at the time of purchase. Specifically, the lower the probability score that a household becomes an owner at the time of purchase, the greater the likelihood of termination of the subsequent ownership spell. This finding suggests that post-purchase counseling programs can be targeted toward those most at risk at the time of home purchase. We also find that postpurchase events affect the likelihood of termination. Important factors include changes in household earnings and wealth, house value, unemployment rates, family size, and marital status. There are substantial racial differences in termination rates. Some of these differences are explained by differences in household characteristics at the time of home purchase, and some by differences in post-purchase events or households’ reactions to them.
Bibliography Citation
Haurin, Donald R., Abdul Munasib and Stuart S. Rosenthal. "Terminations of First-Time Homeownership." Economics Working Paper Series OKSWP0702, Department of Economics, Oklahoma State University, 2007.
6. Munasib, Abdul
Bhattacharya, Samrat
Is the 'Idiot's Box' Raising Idiocy? Early and Middle Childhood Television Watching and Child Cognitive Outcome
Economics of Education Review 29,5 (October 2010): 873-883.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0272775710000300
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Body Mass Index (BMI); Geographical Variation; Mothers, Behavior; Obesity; Parent Supervision/Monitoring; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Regions; Television Viewing; Variables, Instrumental; Weight

There is widespread belief that exposure to television has harmful effects on children's cognitive development. Most studies that point to a negative correlation between hours of television watching and cognitive outcomes, fail to establish causality. Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) we study young children between 5 and 10 years of age during late 1990s and early 2000s. We find strong evidence of negative correlations between hours of television watched and cognitive test scores. However, once parent's characteristics and unobserved child characteristics are taken into account these correlations go away. We find that hours of television viewed per se do not have any measurable impact on children's test scores. Our results are robust to different model specifications and instrumental variable estimates. We conclude that despite the conventional wisdom and the ongoing populist movement, proactive policies to reduce children's television exposure are not likely to improve children's cognitive development and academic performance.

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Bibliography Citation
Munasib, Abdul and Samrat Bhattacharya. "Is the 'Idiot's Box' Raising Idiocy? Early and Middle Childhood Television Watching and Child Cognitive Outcome." Economics of Education Review 29,5 (October 2010): 873-883.