Search Results

Source: Obesity
Resulting in 9 citations.
1. Abrams, Barbara
Heggeseth, Brianna
Rehkopf, David
Davis, Esa M.
Parity and Body Mass Index in U.S. Women: A Prospective 25-year Study
Obesity, V.21, No. 8 (August 2013): 1514–1518.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/oby.20503/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Births, Repeat / Spacing; Body Mass Index (BMI); Childbearing; Life Course; Obesity; Racial Differences; Weight

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objective: To investigate long-term body mass index (BMI) changes with childbearing.

Design and Methods: Adjusted mean BMI changes were estimated by race-ethnicity, baseline BMI and parity using longitudinal regression models in 3943 young females over 10 and 25 year follow-up from the ongoing 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth cohort.

Results: Estimated BMI increases varied by group, ranging from a low of 2.1 BMI units for white, non-overweight nulliparas over the first 10 years to a high of 10.1 BMI units for black, overweight multiparas over the full 25-year follow-up. Impacts of parity were strongest among overweight multiparas and primaparas at ten years, ranges 1.4-1.7 and 0.8-1.3 BMI units, respectively. Among non-overweight women at 10 years, parity-related gain varied by number of births among black and whites but was unassociated in Hispanic women. After 25 years, childbearing significantly increased BMI only among overweight multiparous black women.

Conclusion: Childbearing is associated with permanent weight gain in some women, but the relationship differs by maternal BMI in young adulthood, number of births, race-ethnicity and length of follow-up. Given that overweight black women may be at special risk for accumulation of permanent, long-term weight after childbearing, effective interventions for this group are particularly needed.

Bibliography Citation
Abrams, Barbara, Brianna Heggeseth, David Rehkopf and Esa M. Davis. "Parity and Body Mass Index in U.S. Women: A Prospective 25-year Study." Obesity, V.21, No. 8 (August 2013): 1514–1518. A.
2. Arkes, Jeremy
Longitudinal Association Between Marital Disruption and Child BMI and Obesity
Obesity 20,8 (August 2012): 1696-1702.
Also: http://www.nature.com/oby/journal/v20/n8/abs/oby201284a.html
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Nature Publishing Group
Keyword(s): Body Mass Index (BMI); Child Growth; Child Health; Divorce; Marital Disruption; Obesity; Weight

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This research examines whether family disruptions (i.e., divorces and separation) contribute to children's weight problems. The sample consists of 7,299 observations for 2,333 children, aged 5–14, over the 1986–2006 period, from a US representative sample from the Child and Young Adult Survey accompanying the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY). The study uses individual-fixed-effects models in a longitudinal framework to compare children's BMI and weight problems before and after a disruption. Furthermore, besides doing a before–after comparison for children, the study also estimates the effects at various periods relative to the disruption in order to examine whether children are affected before the disruption and whether any effects change as time passes from the disruption, as some effects may be temporary or slow to develop. Despite having a larger sample than the previous studies, the results provide no evidence that, on average, children's BMI and BMI percentile scores (measured with continuous outcomes) are affected before the disruption, after the disruption, and as time passes from the disruption, relative to a baseline period a few years before the disruption. However, children experiencing a family disruption do have an increased risk of obesity (having a BMI percentile score of 95 or higher) in the two years leading up to the disruption as well as after the disruption, and as time passes from the disruption.
Bibliography Citation
Arkes, Jeremy. "Longitudinal Association Between Marital Disruption and Child BMI and Obesity." Obesity 20,8 (August 2012): 1696-1702.
3. Barnes, Michael G.
Smith, Trenton G.
Yoder, Jonathan K.
Effects of Household Composition and Income Security on Body Weight in Working-age Men
Obesity 21,9 (September 2013): E483-E489.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/oby.20302/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Body Mass Index (BMI); Cohabitation; Household Composition; Income; Labor Force Participation; Obesity; Weight

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using a sample of 2,541 working-age men from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (1979), the effect of cohabitation on weight gain over a 6-year period was estimated. The potential confound caused by the joint determination of economic insecurity and cohabitation status with instrumental variables that exploit variation in local and state-level macroeconomic conditions and the presence of children in the home was addressed.
Bibliography Citation
Barnes, Michael G., Trenton G. Smith and Jonathan K. Yoder. "Effects of Household Composition and Income Security on Body Weight in Working-age Men." Obesity 21,9 (September 2013): E483-E489.
4. Li, Chaoyang
Goran, Michael I.
Kaur, Harsohena
Nollen, Nicole
Ahluwalia, Jasjit S.
Developmental Trajectories of Overweight During Childhood: Role of Early Life Factors
Obesity 15,3 (March 2007): 760-771.
Also: http://www.nature.com/oby/journal/v15/n3/full/oby200790a.html
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Nature Publishing Group
Keyword(s): Birthweight; Body Mass Index (BMI); Breastfeeding; Fertility; Growth Curves; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Modeling, Growth Curve/Latent Trajectory Analysis; Obesity; Pre/post Natal Behavior; Weight

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objective: Our goal was to identify developmental trajectories of overweight in children and to assess early life influences on these trajectories.

Research Methods and Procedures: Participants consisted of 1739 white, black, and Hispanic children who were younger than 2 years at the first survey and were followed up to 12 years of age. Repeated measures of overweight, defined as BMI ≥95th percentile, were used to identify overweight trajectories with a latent growth mixture modeling approach.

Results: Three distinct overweight trajectories were identified: 1) early onset overweight (10.9%), 2) late onset overweight (5.2%), and 3) never overweight (83.9%). After adjustment for multiple potential risk factors, male gender [odds ratio (OR), 1.5; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.0 to 2.2], black ethnicity (OR, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.1 to 2.6), maternal 25 ≤ BMI <30 kg/m2 (OR, 2.2; 95% CI, 1.3 to 3.7) or ≥30 kg/m2 (OR, 5.1; 95% CI, 2.9 to 9.1), maternal weight gain during pregnancy ≥20.43 kg (OR, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.0 to 2.9), and birth weight ≥4000 g (OR, 2.0; 95% CI, 1.2 to 3.4) were associated with an increased risk of early onset overweight. These risk factors, except maternal weight gain, exerted similar effects on late onset overweight. In addition, maternal smoking (OR, 1.6; 95% CI, 0.8 to 3.1) and birth order ≥3 (OR, 2.3; 95% CI, 1.0 to 5.2) were associated with an increased risk of late onset overweight only. Breastfeeding ≥4 months was associated with a decreased risk of both early (OR, 0.7; 95% CI, 0.3 to 1.3) and late onset overweight (OR, 0.7; 95% CI, 0.3 to 1.7).

Discussion: Two trajectories of overweight and one never overweight group were identified. Early life predictors may have a significant influence on the developmental trajectories of overweight in children.

Bibliography Citation
Li, Chaoyang, Michael I. Goran, Harsohena Kaur, Nicole Nollen and Jasjit S. Ahluwalia. "Developmental Trajectories of Overweight During Childhood: Role of Early Life Factors." Obesity 15,3 (March 2007): 760-771.
5. Malhotra, Rahul
Ostbye, Truls
Riley, Crystal M.
Finkelstein, Eric A.
Young Adult Weight Trajectories Through Midlife by Body Mass Category
Obesity 21,9 (September 2013): 1923-1934.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/oby.20318/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Body Mass Index (BMI); Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Life Course; Obesity; Weight

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objective: To estimate the expected weight gain through midlife for those in a given BMI category in young adulthood.

Design and Methods: Group-based trajectory modeling and National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 data from 1990 to 2008 were used to quantify weight trajectories through midlife for 10,038 young adult men and women stratified by BMI category. Logistic regression was used to assess the association of trajectory membership with obesity-related conditions (hypertension, diabetes, arthritis) in middle age.

Results: Annual weight gain averaged 0.53 kg (1.17 lb) across the entire sample. However, there was considerable variation by and within BMI categories. More than 98% of men and 92% of women were on upward-sloping trajectories, generally moving into a higher BMI category by middle age. Those who experienced early and rapid weight gain during young adulthood were most likely to be on a steeper trajectory and had greater risks for obesity-related conditions.

Conclusion: This study points to the health and weight benefits of entering young adulthood with a normal BMI, but further reveals that this is no guarantee of maintaining a healthy weight through midlife. For those who are young adults today, weight maintenance is unlikely to occur without significant environmental or technical innovation.

Bibliography Citation
Malhotra, Rahul, Truls Ostbye, Crystal M. Riley and Eric A. Finkelstein. "Young Adult Weight Trajectories Through Midlife by Body Mass Category." Obesity 21,9 (September 2013): 1923-1934.
6. Margerison-Zilko, Claire E.
Cubbin, Catherine
Dynamic Poverty Experiences and Development of Overweight in a Prospective Cohort of US Children Aged 4-14 Years
Obesity 21,7 (July 2013): 1438-1445.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/oby.20333/abstract
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Body Mass Index (BMI); Children, Poverty; Height; Maternal Employment; Modeling, Hazard/Event History/Survival/Duration; Obesity; Weight

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Design and Methods: Our data are a representative sample of US children from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 Child and Young Adult Survey (1986-2008). We used survival analysis to compare risk of developing overweight or obesity among 5,613 children aged 4-14 years from never poor households, transient poor households (those that became poor only once), recurrent poor households (those that became poor more than once), and persistent poor households (those that became poor and remained poor for at least 4 consecutive years) and examined interactions by race/ethnicity, gender, and age. RESULTS: Compared with children from never poor households, children from transient poor households (HR 0.79, 95% CI: 0.68-0.92), recurrent poor households (HR: 0.73, 95% CI: 0.62-0.87), and persistently poor households (HR: 0.62, 95% CI: 0.51-0.74) had significantly reduced risks of becoming overweight or obese. These associations did not vary by race/ethnicity, gender, or age. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that poverty experiences are associated with reduced risk of becoming overweight or obese among children of 4-14 years
Bibliography Citation
Margerison-Zilko, Claire E. and Catherine Cubbin. "Dynamic Poverty Experiences and Development of Overweight in a Prospective Cohort of US Children Aged 4-14 Years." Obesity 21,7 (July 2013): 1438-1445.
7. Nonnemaker, James M.
Morgan-Lopez, Antonio A.
Pais, Joanne M.
Finkelstein, Eric A.
Youth BMI Trajectories: Evidence from the NLSY97
Obesity 17,6 (June 2009):1274-1280.
Also: http://www.nature.com/oby/journal/v17/n6/full/oby20095a.html
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Nature Publishing Group
Keyword(s): Body Mass Index (BMI); Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Heterogeneity; Weight

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We examined heterogeneity in BMI trajectory classes among youth and variables that may be associated with trajectory class membership. We used data from seven rounds (1997–2003) of the 1997 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY97), a nationally representative, longitudinal survey of people born between 1980 and 1984 who were living in the United States in 1997. The analyses were based on an accelerated longitudinal design. General growth mixture modeling implemented in Mplus (version 4.1) was used to identify subtypes of youth BMI growth trajectories over time. Four distinct youth BMI trajectories were identified. Class 1 includes youth at high risk for becoming obese by young adulthood (at age 12 and 23, ~67 and 90%, respectively, are classified as obese, and almost 72% will have had a BMI 40 at some time during this developmental period). Class 2 includes youth at moderate-to-high risk (at age 12 and 23, ~55 and 68%, respectively, are classified as obese). Class 3 includes youth at low-to-moderate risk (i.e., at age 12 and 23, ~8 and 27%, respectively, are classified as obese). Class 4 includes youth at low risk (few of these youth are obese at any age during this developmental period). These results highlight the importance of considering heterogeneity in BMI growth among youth and early interventions among those most at risk of the adverse health consequences of excess weight.
Bibliography Citation
Nonnemaker, James M., Antonio A. Morgan-Lopez, Joanne M. Pais and Eric A. Finkelstein. "Youth BMI Trajectories: Evidence from the NLSY97." Obesity 17,6 (June 2009):1274-1280.
8. Wein, Lawrence M.
Yang, Yan
Goldhaber-Fiebert, Jeremy D.
Assessing Screening Policies for Childhood Obesity
Obesity 20,7 (July 2012): 1437-1443.
Also: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22240724
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Nature Publishing Group
Keyword(s): Body Mass Index (BMI); Child Health; Children, Health Care; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Obesity; Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

To address growing concerns over childhood obesity, the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recently recommended that children undergo obesity screening beginning at age 6. An Expert Committee recommends starting at age 2. Analysis is needed to assess these recommendations and investigate whether there are better alternatives. We model the age- and sex-specific population-wide distribution of BMI through age 18 using National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) data. The impact of treatment on BMI is estimated using the targeted systematic review performed to aid the USPSTF. The prevalence of hypertension and diabetes at age 40 are estimated from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID). We fix the screening interval at 2 years, and derive the age- and sex-dependent BMI thresholds that minimize adult disease prevalence, subject to referring a specified percentage of children for treatment yearly. We compare this optimal biennial policy to biennial versions of the USPSTF and Expert Committee recommendations. Compared to the USPSTF recommendation, the optimal policy reduces adult disease prevalence by 3% in relative terms (the absolute reductions are <1%) at the same treatment referral rate, or achieves the same disease prevalence at a 28% reduction in treatment referral rate. If compared to the Expert Committee recommendation, the reductions change to 6 and 40%, respectively. The optimal policy treats mostly 16-year olds and few children under age 14. Our results suggest that adult disease is minimized by focusing childhood obesity screening and treatment on older adolescents.
Bibliography Citation
Wein, Lawrence M., Yan Yang and Jeremy D. Goldhaber-Fiebert. "Assessing Screening Policies for Childhood Obesity." Obesity 20,7 (July 2012): 1437-1443.
9. Wolfe, Joseph D.
Baker, Elizabeth H.
Scarinci, Isabel C.
Wealth and Obesity Among US Adults Entering Midlife
Obesity published online (22 October 2019): DOI: 10.1002/oby.22625.
Also: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/oby.22625
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Gender Differences; Home Ownership; Net Worth; Obesity; Racial Differences; Wealth

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objective: This study examines the relationship between wealth and obesity among adults entering midlife and whether this relationship varies by sex, race, and measure of wealth.

Methods: The data were obtained from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY‐79). Population‐averaged models were used to examine the associations between multiple measures of wealth and obesity among 6,979 respondents while controlling for education, occupation, income, and relevant sociodemographic variables.

Results: The analysis found a robust association between wealth and midlife obesity as well as heterogeneity in the wealth‐obesity association across sex, race, and measure of wealth. With the exception of black men, net worth generally had a significant and inverse relationship with obesity. The net worth-obesity association was largest among women and was driven primarily by home value, in addition to savings and debt for black women. Although home value was significant for white men, the components of wealth were generally unrelated to obesity among men.

Bibliography Citation
Wolfe, Joseph D., Elizabeth H. Baker and Isabel C. Scarinci. "Wealth and Obesity Among US Adults Entering Midlife." Obesity published online (22 October 2019): DOI: 10.1002/oby.22625.